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  1. 20 Jan, 2021 1 commit
  2. 19 Jan, 2021 2 commits
  3. 15 Dec, 2020 1 commit
  4. 02 Dec, 2020 4 commits
  5. 01 Dec, 2020 1 commit
    • Amartey Pearson's avatar
      Buffer serial console reads to reduce CPU consumption · eeda6155
      Amartey Pearson authored
      
      
      Serial consoles - especially in TLS mode - tend to result in
      lots of small (single digit) byte reads even when pushing large
      amounts of data (cat'ing a large file for example).  The overhead
      of proxying each packet (especially with TLS) can become very CPU
      intensive.
      
      This will buffer reads with a progressively incrementing timeout
      before writing while ensuring the buffer does flush once the timeout
      is hit.  After reading nothing, the timeout will reset thereby
      providing a good interactive user experience.  That is, only when
      sending large volumes of data will the user start to experience
      the choppy buffering.
      Signed-off-by: Amartey Pearson's avatarAmartey Pearson <apearson@us.ibm.com>
      eeda6155
  6. 28 Sep, 2020 1 commit
  7. 23 Sep, 2020 1 commit
    • Amartey Pearson's avatar
      Add healthz and statusz api endpoints · f7b905b1
      Amartey Pearson authored
      
      
      The healthz endpoint provides a confirmation that the application
      is up and running - useful in a kubernetes liveness/readiness
      probe scenario.  It simply returns HTTP 200.
      
      The statusz endpoint provides some debug info on the active
      connections in json.
      
      /statusz
      {
        "number_active": 1,
        "active_sessions": [
          {
            "type": "vnc",
            "address": "localhost:5900",
            "insecure": true,
            "tlsTunnel": false,
            "password": "****"
          }
        ]
      }
      Signed-off-by: Amartey Pearson's avatarAmartey Pearson <apearson@us.ibm.com>
      f7b905b1
  8. 26 Aug, 2020 1 commit
  9. 20 Aug, 2020 3 commits
  10. 18 Aug, 2020 1 commit
  11. 17 Aug, 2020 1 commit
  12. 05 Aug, 2020 2 commits
  13. 29 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  14. 30 Apr, 2020 1 commit
  15. 07 Apr, 2020 1 commit
    • Daniel P. Berrangé's avatar
      github: enable lockdown of issues and merge requests · b53e7b12
      Daniel P. Berrangé authored
      Libvirt uses GitHub as an automated read-only mirror. The goals were to
      have a disaster recovery backup for libvirt.org, a way to make it easy
      for people to clone their own private copy of libvirt Git, and finally
      as a way to interact with apps like Travis.
      
      The project description was set to a message telling people that we
      don't respond to pull requests. This was quite a negative message to
      potential contributors, and also did not give them any guidance about
      the right way to submit to libvirt. Many also missed the description and
      submitted issues or pull requests regardless.
      
      It is possible to disable the issue tracker in GitHub, but there is no
      way to disable merge requests. Disabling the issue tracker would also
      leave the problem of users not being given any positive information
      about where they should be reporting instead.
      
      There is a fairly new 3rd party application built for GitHub that
      provides a bot which auto-responds to both issues and merge requests,
      closing and locking them, with a arbitrary comment:
      
         https://github.com/apps/repo-lockdown
      
      
      
      This commit adds a suitable configuration file for libvirt, which
      tries to give a positive response to user's issue/pullreq and guide
      them to the desired contribution path on GitLab.
      Reviewed-by: Andrea Bolognani's avatarAndrea Bolognani <abologna@redhat.com>
      Reviewed-by: Pavel Hrdina's avatarPavel Hrdina <phrdina@redhat.com>
      Reviewed-by: Eric Blake's avatarEric Blake <eblake@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: Daniel P. Berrangé's avatarDaniel P. Berrangé <berrange@redhat.com>
      b53e7b12
  16. 11 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  17. 16 Jan, 2020 1 commit
  18. 21 Nov, 2019 7 commits
  19. 24 Apr, 2018 1 commit
    • Daniel P. Berrangé's avatar
      git: add config file telling git-publish how to send patches · aea09f92
      Daniel P. Berrangé authored
      
      
      The "git-publish" tool is a useful git extension for sending patch
      series for code review. It automatically creates versioned tags
      each time code on a branch is sent, so that there is a record of
      each version. It also remembers the cover letter so it does not
      need re-entering each time the series is reposted.
      
      With this config file present it is now sufficient[1] to run
      
        $ git publish
      
      to send all patches in a branch to the list for review, with the
      correct subject prefix added for this non-core libvirt module.
      
      [1] Assuming your $HOME/.gitconfig has an SMTP server listed
      at least e.g.
      
         [sendemail]
              smtpserver = smtp.example.com
      Signed-off-by: Daniel P. Berrangé's avatarDaniel P. Berrangé <berrange@redhat.com>
      aea09f92
  20. 26 Jan, 2017 4 commits
  21. 25 Jan, 2017 4 commits