Commit 8d357f02 authored by Scott Nesbitt's avatar Scott Nesbitt

Update 2017-02-07-m10.md

parent 9fc1da4c
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ layout: post
published: true
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<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/grass-lawn-technology-tablet.jpg" alt="A tablet, lying in the grass" /></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/grass-lawn-technology-tablet.jpg" alt="A tablet, lying in the grass" /></p>
This post has been a long time in coming. Let me explain.
......@@ -41,13 +41,13 @@ With that out of the way, let's continue.
When you log into the M10, you're presented with a set of Scopes (what Canonical, the folks behind Ubuntu Touch, describes as *[individual home screens for different kinds of content](https://www.ubuntu.com/phone/features)*). Those Scopes include local news and photos, a list of installed applications, music, and more. You can change what Scopes appear in the tablet's settings. Here's the Scope that I see when I start my tablet:
<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/ut-main-screen.png" alt="The Ubuntu Touch tablet's main screen" /></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/ut-main-screen.png" alt="The Ubuntu Touch tablet's main screen" /></p>
Using a tablet powered by Ubuntu Touch is a bit different from using an Android or iOS device. Sure, firing up apps and tapping and swiping generally work the same way. But the way in which you switch between active apps is quite different.
You swipe right or left to switch between Scopes. To switch between apps, you need to swipe inward from the right edge of the screen. Doing that stacks the running apps as a set of tiles.
<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/ut-tiled-apps.png" alt="Apps in Ubuntu Touch tiled after swiping" /></a></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/ut-tiled-apps.png" alt="Apps in Ubuntu Touch tiled after swiping" /></a></p>
Tap a tile to switch to it, or swipe the app upwards to close it.
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ The update I mentioned a few paragraphs ago removed some apps, like Phone (for m
The apps and Scopes on an Ubuntu Touch device are a little different from what you'd be used to on Android and iOS devices. While you can install apps from the Ubuntu Store, a number of those apps are similar, in many ways, to certain apps available for the Chromebook. They're more like links to web applications and services rather than true apps that live on the device.
<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/ut-ubuntu-store.png" alt="Apps in the Ubuntu Store" /></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/ut-ubuntu-store.png" alt="Apps in the Ubuntu Store" /></p>
The selection of apps in the Ubuntu Store, in terms of breadth and depth, isn't comparable to what's available for Android or iOS. Not even close, to be honest. There are few, if any, *official* apps for popular web applications and services. Instead, get either unofficial ones (like the ones for Instagram and Dropbox) or ones that are web links.
......@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ If you're curious, the apps I use most are:
There are a few other apps that I use as well, but the ones I've listed above are the ones that I use the most.
<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/ut-working.png" alt="An app in action" /></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/ut-working.png" alt="An app in action" /></p>
When I first worked with the tablet last winter, the apps and Scopes could be slow. Now, they're a lot faster and more responsive. I did, however, run into few apps that didn't work (like the app for online radio station Soma.fm) or which were just disappointing. The latter wasn't a surprise. Not every Android or iOS app I've used has thrilled me, either.
......@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ When I first worked with the tablet last winter, the apps and Scopes could be sl
I mentioned the tablet's *Desktop Mode* at the beginning of this post. Desktop Mode, as the name implies, turns the tablet's interface into one that's reminiscent of a desktop or laptop compter complete with traditional windows.
<p align="center"><img src="{{ site.baseurl }}img/ut-desktop-mode.png" alt="An example of desktop mode" /></p>
<p align="center"><img src="../img/ut-desktop-mode.png" alt="An example of desktop mode" /></p>
You can manually enter Desktop Mode by swiping down the **Settings** icon, going to **System Settings**, and tapping **Desktop Mode**. If you connect the tablet to a monitor, or pair it with a Bluetooth mouse, it automatically goes into Desktop Mode. I couldn´t fully test it because I don't have a monitor. I did connect the tablet to a large TV, but the screen was a bit too large. And I had to manually turn off Desktop Mode after unplugging the tablet.
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