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    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      llseek: automatically add .llseek fop · 6038f373
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All file_operations should get a .llseek operation so we can make
      nonseekable_open the default for future file operations without a
      .llseek pointer.
      
      The three cases that we can automatically detect are no_llseek, seq_lseek
      and default_llseek. For cases where we can we can automatically prove that
      the file offset is always ignored, we use noop_llseek, which maintains
      the current behavior of not returning an error from a seek.
      
      New drivers should normally not use noop_llseek but instead use no_llseek
      and call nonseekable_open at open time.  Existing drivers can be converted
      to do the same when the maintainer knows for certain that no user code
      relies on calling seek on the device file.
      
      The generated code is often incorrectly indented and right now contains
      comments that clarify for each added line why a specific variant was
      chosen. In the version that gets submitted upstream, the comments will
      be gone and I will manually fix the indentation, because there does not
      seem to be a way to do that using coccinelle.
      
      Some amount of new code is currently sitting in linux-next that should get
      the same modifications, which I will do at the end of the merge window.
      
      Many thanks to Julia Lawall for helping me learn to write a semantic
      patch that does all this.
      
      ===== begin semantic patch =====
      // This adds an llseek= method to all file operations,
      // as a preparation for making no_llseek the default.
      //
      // The rules are
      // - use no_llseek explicitly if we do nonseekable_open
      // - use seq_lseek for sequential files
      // - use default_llseek if we know we access f_pos
      // - use noop_llseek if we know we don't access f_pos,
      //   but we still want to allow users to call lseek
      //
      @ open1 exists @
      identifier nested_open;
      @@
      nested_open(...)
      {
      <+...
      nonseekable_open(...)
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ open exists@
      identifier open_f;
      identifier i, f;
      identifier open1.nested_open;
      @@
      int open_f(struct inode *i, struct file *f)
      {
      <+...
      (
      nonseekable_open(...)
      |
      nested_open(...)
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
         *off = E
      |
         *off += E
      |
         func(..., off, ...)
      |
         E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read_no_fpos disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ write @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
        *off = E
      |
        *off += E
      |
        func(..., off, ...)
      |
        E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ write_no_fpos @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ fops0 @
      identifier fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
       ...
      };
      
      @ has_llseek depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier llseek_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .llseek = llseek_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_read depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_write depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_open depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .open = open_f,
      ...
      };
      
      // use no_llseek if we call nonseekable_open
      ////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ nonseekable1 depends on !has_llseek && has_open @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier nso ~= "nonseekable_open";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = nso, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* nonseekable */
      };
      
      @ nonseekable2 depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open.open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = open_f, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* open uses nonseekable */
      };
      
      // use seq_lseek for sequential files
      /////////////////////////////////////
      @ seq depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier sr ~= "seq_read";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .read = sr, ...
      +.llseek = seq_lseek, /* we have seq_read */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if there is a readdir
      ///////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops1 depends on !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier readdir_e;
      @@
      // any other fop is used that changes pos
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .readdir = readdir_e, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* readdir is present */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if at least one of read/write touches f_pos
      /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops2 depends on !fops1 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read.read_f;
      @@
      // read fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* read accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      @ fops3 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +	.llseek = default_llseek, /* write accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      // Use noop_llseek if neither read nor write accesses f_pos
      ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      
      @ fops4 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !fops3 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read and write both use no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_write && !has_read && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* write uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on !has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* no read or write fn */
      };
      ===== End semantic patch =====
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      Cc: Julia Lawall <julia@diku.dk>
      Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
      6038f373
  10. 22 Sep, 2010 1 commit
  11. 06 Aug, 2010 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      Fix init ordering of /dev/console vs callers of modprobe · 31d1d48e
      David Howells authored
      Make /dev/console get initialised before any initialisation routine that
      invokes modprobe because if modprobe fails, it's going to want to open
      /dev/console, presumably to write an error message to.
      
      The problem with that is that if the /dev/console driver is not yet
      initialised, the chardev handler will call request_module() to invoke
      modprobe, which will fail, because we never compile /dev/console as a
      module.
      
      This will lead to a modprobe loop, showing the following in the kernel
      log:
      
      	request_module: runaway loop modprobe char-major-5-1
      	request_module: runaway loop modprobe char-major-5-1
      	request_module: runaway loop modprobe char-major-5-1
      	request_module: runaway loop modprobe char-major-5-1
      	request_module: runaway loop modprobe char-major-5-1
      
      This can happen, for example, when the built in md5 module can't find
      the built in cryptomgr module (because the latter fails to initialise).
      The md5 module comes before the call to tty_init(), presumably because
      'crypto' comes before 'drivers' alphabetically.
      
      Fix this by calling tty_init() from chrdev_init().
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
      31d1d48e
  12. 24 Sep, 2009 1 commit
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  15. 12 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  16. 12 Jun, 2009 1 commit
    • Theodore Ts'o's avatar
      fs: Remove i_cindex from struct inode · 9fd5746f
      Theodore Ts'o authored
      The only user of the i_cindex element in the inode structure is used
      is by the firewire drivers.  As part of an attempt to slim down the
      inode structure to save memory --- since a typical Linux system will
      have hundreds of thousands if not millions of inodes cached, a
      reduction in the size inode has high leverage.
      
      The firewire driver does not need i_cindex in any fast path, so it's
      simple enough to calculate when it is needed, instead of wasting space
      in the inode structure.
      Signed-off-by: Theodore Ts'o's avatar"Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu>
      Cc: krh@redhat.com
      Cc: stefanr@s5r6.in-berlin.de
      Cc: linux-fsdevel@vger.kernel.org
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAl Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
      9fd5746f
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