1. 24 Dec, 2016 1 commit
  2. 14 Dec, 2016 1 commit
  3. 08 Jan, 2016 1 commit
  4. 27 Apr, 2015 1 commit
  5. 24 Nov, 2014 2 commits
  6. 12 Nov, 2014 1 commit
    • Christoph Hellwig's avatar
      scsi: don't set tagging state from scsi_adjust_queue_depth · c8b09f6f
      Christoph Hellwig authored
      Remove the tagged argument from scsi_adjust_queue_depth, and just let it
      handle the queue depth.  For most drivers those two are fairly separate,
      given that most modern drivers don't care about the SCSI "tagged" status
      of a command at all, and many old drivers allow queuing of multiple
      untagged commands in the driver.
      
      Instead we start out with the ->simple_tags flag set before calling
      ->slave_configure, which is how all drivers actually looking at
      ->simple_tags except for one worke anyway.  The one other case looks
      broken, but I've kept the behavior as-is for now.
      
      Except for that we only change ->simple_tags from the ->change_queue_type,
      and when rejecting a tag message in a single driver, so keeping this
      churn out of scsi_adjust_queue_depth is a clear win.
      
      Now that the usage of scsi_adjust_queue_depth is more obvious we can
      also remove all the trivial instances in ->slave_alloc or ->slave_configure
      that just set it to the cmd_per_lun default.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChristoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarMike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu>
      Reviewed-by: Hannes Reinecke's avatarHannes Reinecke <hare@suse.de>
      Reviewed-by: Martin K. Petersen's avatarMartin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
      c8b09f6f
  7. 29 Nov, 2013 1 commit
    • Martin K. Petersen's avatar
      [SCSI] Disable WRITE SAME for RAID and virtual host adapter drivers · 54b2b50c
      Martin K. Petersen authored
      Some host adapters do not pass commands through to the target disk
      directly. Instead they provide an emulated target which may or may not
      accurately report its capabilities. In some cases the physical device
      characteristics are reported even when the host adapter is processing
      commands on the device's behalf. This can lead to adapter firmware hangs
      or excessive I/O errors.
      
      This patch disables WRITE SAME for devices connected to host adapters
      that provide an emulated target. Driver writers can disable WRITE SAME
      by setting the no_write_same flag in the host adapter template.
      
      [jejb: fix up rejections due to eh_deadline patch]
      Signed-off-by: Martin K. Petersen's avatarMartin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
      Cc: stable@kernel.org
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJames Bottomley <JBottomley@Parallels.com>
      54b2b50c
  8. 24 Jun, 2013 1 commit
  9. 23 Feb, 2013 1 commit
  10. 03 Jan, 2013 1 commit
    • Greg Kroah-Hartman's avatar
      Drivers: scsi: remove __dev* attributes. · 6f039790
      Greg Kroah-Hartman authored
      CONFIG_HOTPLUG is going away as an option.  As a result, the __dev*
      markings need to be removed.
      
      This change removes the use of __devinit, __devexit_p, __devinitdata,
      __devinitconst, and __devexit from these drivers.
      
      Based on patches originally written by Bill Pemberton, but redone by me
      in order to handle some of the coding style issues better, by hand.
      
      Cc: Bill Pemberton <wfp5p@virginia.edu>
      Cc: Adam Radford <linuxraid@lsi.com>
      Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <JBottomley@parallels.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      6f039790
  11. 16 Nov, 2010 1 commit
    • Jeff Garzik's avatar
      SCSI host lock push-down · f281233d
      Jeff Garzik authored
      Move the mid-layer's ->queuecommand() invocation from being locked
      with the host lock to being unlocked to facilitate speeding up the
      critical path for drivers who don't need this lock taken anyway.
      
      The patch below presents a simple SCSI host lock push-down as an
      equivalent transformation.  No locking or other behavior should change
      with this patch.  All existing bugs and locking orders are preserved.
      
      Additionally, add one parameter to queuecommand,
      	struct Scsi_Host *
      and remove one parameter from queuecommand,
      	void (*done)(struct scsi_cmnd *)
      
      Scsi_Host* is a convenient pointer that most host drivers need anyway,
      and 'done' is redundant to struct scsi_cmnd->scsi_done.
      
      Minimal code disturbance was attempted with this change.  Most drivers
      needed only two one-line modifications for their host lock push-down.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJeff Garzik <jgarzik@redhat.com>
      Acked-by: default avatarJames Bottomley <James.Bottomley@suse.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
      f281233d
  12. 15 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      llseek: automatically add .llseek fop · 6038f373
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All file_operations should get a .llseek operation so we can make
      nonseekable_open the default for future file operations without a
      .llseek pointer.
      
      The three cases that we can automatically detect are no_llseek, seq_lseek
      and default_llseek. For cases where we can we can automatically prove that
      the file offset is always ignored, we use noop_llseek, which maintains
      the current behavior of not returning an error from a seek.
      
      New drivers should normally not use noop_llseek but instead use no_llseek
      and call nonseekable_open at open time.  Existing drivers can be converted
      to do the same when the maintainer knows for certain that no user code
      relies on calling seek on the device file.
      
      The generated code is often incorrectly indented and right now contains
      comments that clarify for each added line why a specific variant was
      chosen. In the version that gets submitted upstream, the comments will
      be gone and I will manually fix the indentation, because there does not
      seem to be a way to do that using coccinelle.
      
      Some amount of new code is currently sitting in linux-next that should get
      the same modifications, which I will do at the end of the merge window.
      
      Many thanks to Julia Lawall for helping me learn to write a semantic
      patch that does all this.
      
      ===== begin semantic patch =====
      // This adds an llseek= method to all file operations,
      // as a preparation for making no_llseek the default.
      //
      // The rules are
      // - use no_llseek explicitly if we do nonseekable_open
      // - use seq_lseek for sequential files
      // - use default_llseek if we know we access f_pos
      // - use noop_llseek if we know we don't access f_pos,
      //   but we still want to allow users to call lseek
      //
      @ open1 exists @
      identifier nested_open;
      @@
      nested_open(...)
      {
      <+...
      nonseekable_open(...)
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ open exists@
      identifier open_f;
      identifier i, f;
      identifier open1.nested_open;
      @@
      int open_f(struct inode *i, struct file *f)
      {
      <+...
      (
      nonseekable_open(...)
      |
      nested_open(...)
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
         *off = E
      |
         *off += E
      |
         func(..., off, ...)
      |
         E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read_no_fpos disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ write @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
        *off = E
      |
        *off += E
      |
        func(..., off, ...)
      |
        E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ write_no_fpos @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ fops0 @
      identifier fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
       ...
      };
      
      @ has_llseek depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier llseek_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .llseek = llseek_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_read depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_write depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_open depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .open = open_f,
      ...
      };
      
      // use no_llseek if we call nonseekable_open
      ////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ nonseekable1 depends on !has_llseek && has_open @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier nso ~= "nonseekable_open";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = nso, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* nonseekable */
      };
      
      @ nonseekable2 depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open.open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = open_f, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* open uses nonseekable */
      };
      
      // use seq_lseek for sequential files
      /////////////////////////////////////
      @ seq depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier sr ~= "seq_read";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .read = sr, ...
      +.llseek = seq_lseek, /* we have seq_read */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if there is a readdir
      ///////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops1 depends on !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier readdir_e;
      @@
      // any other fop is used that changes pos
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .readdir = readdir_e, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* readdir is present */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if at least one of read/write touches f_pos
      /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops2 depends on !fops1 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read.read_f;
      @@
      // read fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* read accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      @ fops3 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +	.llseek = default_llseek, /* write accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      // Use noop_llseek if neither read nor write accesses f_pos
      ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      
      @ fops4 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !fops3 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read and write both use no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_write && !has_read && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* write uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on !has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* no read or write fn */
      };
      ===== End semantic patch =====
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      Cc: Julia Lawall <julia@diku.dk>
      Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
      6038f373
  13. 15 Sep, 2010 1 commit
    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      scsi: autoconvert trivial BKL users to private mutex · c45d15d2
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All these files use the big kernel lock in a trivial
      way to serialize their private file operations,
      typically resulting from an earlier semi-automatic
      pushdown from VFS.
      
      None of these drivers appears to want to lock against
      other code, and they all use the BKL as the top-level
      lock in their file operations, meaning that there
      is no lock-order inversion problem.
      
      Consequently, we can remove the BKL completely,
      replacing it with a per-file mutex in every case.
      Using a scripted approach means we can avoid
      typos.
      
      file=$1
      name=$2
      if grep -q lock_kernel ${file} ; then
          if grep -q 'include.*linux.mutex.h' ${file} ; then
                  sed -i '/include.*<linux\/smp_lock.h>/d' ${file}
          else
                  sed -i 's/include.*<linux\/smp_lock.h>.*$/include <linux\/mutex.h>/g' ${file}
          fi
          sed -i ${file} \
              -e "/^#include.*linux.mutex.h/,$ {
                      1,/^\(static\|int\|long\)/ {
                           /^\(static\|int\|long\)/istatic DEFINE_MUTEX(${name}_mutex);
      
      } }"  \
          -e "s/\(un\)*lock_kernel\>[ ]*()/mutex_\1lock(\&${name}_mutex)/g" \
          -e '/[      ]*cycle_kernel_lock();/d'
      else
          sed -i -e '/include.*\<smp_lock.h\>/d' ${file}  \
                      -e '/cycle_kernel_lock()/d'
      fi
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      Cc: linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
      Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@suse.de>
      c45d15d2
  14. 17 May, 2010 1 commit
  15. 11 Apr, 2010 1 commit
  16. 30 Mar, 2010 1 commit
    • Tejun Heo's avatar
      include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking... · 5a0e3ad6
      Tejun Heo authored
      include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking implicit slab.h inclusion from percpu.h
      
      percpu.h is included by sched.h and module.h and thus ends up being
      included when building most .c files.  percpu.h includes slab.h which
      in turn includes gfp.h making everything defined by the two files
      universally available and complicating inclusion dependencies.
      
      percpu.h -> slab.h dependency is about to be removed.  Prepare for
      this change by updating users of gfp and slab facilities include those
      headers directly instead of assuming availability.  As this conversion
      needs to touch large number of source files, the following script is
      used as the basis of conversion.
      
        http://userweb.kernel.org/~tj/misc/slabh-sweep.py
      
      The script does the followings.
      
      * Scan files for gfp and slab usages and update includes such that
        only the necessary includes are there.  ie. if only gfp is used,
        gfp.h, if slab is used, slab.h.
      
      * When the script inserts a new include, it looks at the include
        blocks and try to put the new include such that its order conforms
        to its surrounding.  It's put in the include block which contains
        core kernel includes, in the same order that the rest are ordered -
        alphabetical, Christmas tree, rev-Xmas-tree or at the end if there
        doesn't seem to be any matching order.
      
      * If the script can't find a place to put a new include (mostly
        because the file doesn't have fitting include block), it prints out
        an error message indicating which .h file needs to be added to the
        file.
      
      The conversion was done in the following steps.
      
      1. The initial automatic conversion of all .c files updated slightly
         over 4000 files, deleting around 700 includes and adding ~480 gfp.h
         and ~3000 slab.h inclusions.  The script emitted errors for ~400
         files.
      
      2. Each error was manually checked.  Some didn't need the inclusion,
         some needed manual addition while adding it to implementation .h or
         embedding .c file was more appropriate for others.  This step added
         inclusions to around 150 files.
      
      3. The script was run again and the output was compared to the edits
         from #2 to make sure no file was left behind.
      
      4. Several build tests were done and a couple of problems were fixed.
         e.g. lib/decompress_*.c used malloc/free() wrappers around slab
         APIs requiring slab.h to be added manually.
      
      5. The script was run on all .h files but without automatically
         editing them as sprinkling gfp.h and slab.h inclusions around .h
         files could easily lead to inclusion dependency hell.  Most gfp.h
         inclusion directives were ignored as stuff from gfp.h was usually
         wildly available and often used in preprocessor macros.  Each
         slab.h inclusion directive was examined and added manually as
         necessary.
      
      6. percpu.h was updated not to include slab.h.
      
      7. Build test were done on the following configurations and failures
         were fixed.  CONFIG_GCOV_KERNEL was turned off for all tests (as my
         distributed build env didn't work with gcov compiles) and a few
         more options had to be turned off depending on archs to make things
         build (like ipr on powerpc/64 which failed due to missing writeq).
      
         * x86 and x86_64 UP and SMP allmodconfig and a custom test config.
         * powerpc and powerpc64 SMP allmodconfig
         * sparc and sparc64 SMP allmodconfig
         * ia64 SMP allmodconfig
         * s390 SMP allmodconfig
         * alpha SMP allmodconfig
         * um on x86_64 SMP allmodconfig
      
      8. percpu.h modifications were reverted so that it could be applied as
         a separate patch and serve as bisection point.
      
      Given the fact that I had only a couple of failures from tests on step
      6, I'm fairly confident about the coverage of this conversion patch.
      If there is a breakage, it's likely to be something in one of the arch
      headers which should be easily discoverable easily on most builds of
      the specific arch.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarTejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
      Guess-its-ok-by: default avatarChristoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
      Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
      Cc: Lee Schermerhorn <Lee.Schermerhorn@hp.com>
      5a0e3ad6
  17. 04 Dec, 2009 1 commit
    • Mike Christie's avatar
      [SCSI] modify change_queue_depth to take in reason why it is being called · e881a172
      Mike Christie authored
      This patch modifies scsi_host_template->change_queue_depth so that
      it takes an argument indicating why it is being called. This will be
      used so that if a LLD needs to do some extra processing when
      handling queue fulls or later ramp ups, it can do so.
      
      This is a simple port of the drivers setting a change_queue_depth
      callback. In the patch I just have these LLDs adjust the queue depth
      if the user was requesting it.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu>
      
      [Vasu.Dev: v2
      	Also converted pmcraid_change_queue_depth and then verified
      all modules compile  using "make allmodconfig" for any new build
      warnings on X86_64.
      
      	Updated original description after combing two original
      patches from Mike to make this patch git bisectable.]
      Signed-off-by: Vasu Dev's avatarVasu Dev <vasu.dev@intel.com>
      [jejb: fixed up 53c700]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJames Bottomley <James.Bottomley@suse.de>
      e881a172
  18. 09 Nov, 2009 1 commit
  19. 15 May, 2009 1 commit
  20. 23 Oct, 2008 1 commit
  21. 20 Jun, 2008 2 commits
  22. 20 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  23. 07 Apr, 2008 2 commits
  24. 30 Jan, 2008 1 commit
    • James Bottomley's avatar
      [SCSI] remove use_sg_chaining · d3f46f39
      James Bottomley authored
      With the sg table code, every SCSI driver is now either chain capable
      or broken (or has sg_tablesize set so chaining is never activated), so
      there's no need to have a check in the host template.
      
      Also tidy up the code by moving the scatterlist size defines into the
      SCSI includes and permit the last entry of the scatterlist pools not
      to be a power of two.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJames Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
      d3f46f39
  25. 22 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  26. 16 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  27. 31 May, 2007 1 commit
  28. 14 Apr, 2007 1 commit
  29. 12 Feb, 2007 1 commit
  30. 06 Jan, 2007 1 commit
  31. 05 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      IRQ: Maintain regs pointer globally rather than passing to IRQ handlers · 7d12e780
      David Howells authored
      Maintain a per-CPU global "struct pt_regs *" variable which can be used instead
      of passing regs around manually through all ~1800 interrupt handlers in the
      Linux kernel.
      
      The regs pointer is used in few places, but it potentially costs both stack
      space and code to pass it around.  On the FRV arch, removing the regs parameter
      from all the genirq function results in a 20% speed up of the IRQ exit path
      (ie: from leaving timer_interrupt() to leaving do_IRQ()).
      
      Where appropriate, an arch may override the generic storage facility and do
      something different with the variable.  On FRV, for instance, the address is
      maintained in GR28 at all times inside the kernel as part of general exception
      handling.
      
      Having looked over the code, it appears that the parameter may be handed down
      through up to twenty or so layers of functions.  Consider a USB character
      device attached to a USB hub, attached to a USB controller that posts its
      interrupts through a cascaded auxiliary interrupt controller.  A character
      device driver may want to pass regs to the sysrq handler through the input
      layer which adds another few layers of parameter passing.
      
      I've build this code with allyesconfig for x86_64 and i386.  I've runtested the
      main part of the code on FRV and i386, though I can't test most of the drivers.
      I've also done partial conversion for powerpc and MIPS - these at least compile
      with minimal configurations.
      
      This will affect all archs.  Mostly the changes should be relatively easy.
      Take do_IRQ(), store the regs pointer at the beginning, saving the old one:
      
      	struct pt_regs *old_regs = set_irq_regs(regs);
      
      And put the old one back at the end:
      
      	set_irq_regs(old_regs);
      
      Don't pass regs through to generic_handle_irq() or __do_IRQ().
      
      In timer_interrupt(), this sort of change will be necessary:
      
      	-	update_process_times(user_mode(regs));
      	-	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING, regs);
      	+	update_process_times(user_mode(get_irq_regs()));
      	+	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING);
      
      I'd like to move update_process_times()'s use of get_irq_regs() into itself,
      except that i386, alone of the archs, uses something other than user_mode().
      
      Some notes on the interrupt handling in the drivers:
      
       (*) input_dev() is now gone entirely.  The regs pointer is no longer stored in
           the input_dev struct.
      
       (*) finish_unlinks() in drivers/usb/host/ohci-q.c needs checking.  It does
           something different depending on whether it's been supplied with a regs
           pointer or not.
      
       (*) Various IRQ handler function pointers have been moved to type
           irq_handler_t.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      (cherry picked from 1b16e7ac850969f38b375e511e3fa2f474a33867 commit)
      7d12e780
  32. 26 Sep, 2006 1 commit
  33. 02 Jul, 2006 1 commit
  34. 10 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  35. 06 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  36. 11 Apr, 2006 1 commit
  37. 14 Jan, 2006 1 commit