Commit 0e95c853 authored by Mauro Carvalho Chehab's avatar Mauro Carvalho Chehab Committed by Jonathan Corbet

io_ordering.txt: standardize document format

Each text file under Documentation follows a different
format. Some doesn't even have titles!

Change its representation to follow the adopted standard,
using ReST markups for it to be parseable by Sphinx:

- Add a title;
- mark literal-blocks as such.
Signed-off-by: default avatarMauro Carvalho Chehab <mchehab@s-opensource.com>
Signed-off-by: default avatarJonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
parent 9cf5116d
==============================================
Ordering I/O writes to memory-mapped addresses
==============================================
On some platforms, so-called memory-mapped I/O is weakly ordered. On such
platforms, driver writers are responsible for ensuring that I/O writes to
memory-mapped addresses on their device arrive in the order intended. This is
......@@ -8,39 +12,39 @@ critical section of code protected by spinlocks. This would ensure that
subsequent writes to I/O space arrived only after all prior writes (much like a
memory barrier op, mb(), only with respect to I/O).
A more concrete example from a hypothetical device driver:
A more concrete example from a hypothetical device driver::
...
CPU A: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU A: val = readl(my_status);
CPU A: ...
CPU A: writel(newval, ring_ptr);
CPU A: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
CPU B: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU B: val = readl(my_status);
CPU B: ...
CPU B: writel(newval2, ring_ptr);
CPU B: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
...
CPU A: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU A: val = readl(my_status);
CPU A: ...
CPU A: writel(newval, ring_ptr);
CPU A: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
CPU B: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU B: val = readl(my_status);
CPU B: ...
CPU B: writel(newval2, ring_ptr);
CPU B: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
In the case above, the device may receive newval2 before it receives newval,
which could cause problems. Fixing it is easy enough though:
which could cause problems. Fixing it is easy enough though::
...
CPU A: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU A: val = readl(my_status);
CPU A: ...
CPU A: writel(newval, ring_ptr);
CPU A: (void)readl(safe_register); /* maybe a config register? */
CPU A: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
CPU B: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU B: val = readl(my_status);
CPU B: ...
CPU B: writel(newval2, ring_ptr);
CPU B: (void)readl(safe_register); /* maybe a config register? */
CPU B: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
CPU A: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU A: val = readl(my_status);
CPU A: ...
CPU A: writel(newval, ring_ptr);
CPU A: (void)readl(safe_register); /* maybe a config register? */
CPU A: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
...
CPU B: spin_lock_irqsave(&dev_lock, flags)
CPU B: val = readl(my_status);
CPU B: ...
CPU B: writel(newval2, ring_ptr);
CPU B: (void)readl(safe_register); /* maybe a config register? */
CPU B: spin_unlock_irqrestore(&dev_lock, flags)
Here, the reads from safe_register will cause the I/O chipset to flush any
pending writes before actually posting the read to the chipset, preventing
......
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