Commit e34c7e2b authored by Junio C Hamano's avatar Junio C Hamano

Merge branch 'ta/doc-no-small-caps'

Update documentation to change "GIT" which was a poor-man's small
caps to "Git".  The latter was the intended spelling.

Also change "git" spelled in all-lowercase to "Git" when it refers
to the system as the whole or the concept it embodies, as opposed to
the command the end users would type.

* ta/doc-no-small-caps:
  Documentation: StGit is the right spelling, not StGIT
  Documentation: describe the "repository" in repository-layout
  Documentation: add a description for 'gitfile' to glossary
  Documentation: do not use undefined terms git-dir and git-file
  Documentation: the name of the system is 'Git', not 'git'
  Documentation: avoid poor-man's small caps GIT
parents 6d81ce05 afeef30c
Like other projects, we also have some guidelines to keep to the
code. For git in general, three rough rules are:
code. For Git in general, three rough rules are:
- Most importantly, we never say "It's in POSIX; we'll happily
ignore your needs should your system not conform to it."
......@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ code. For git in general, three rough rules are:
As for more concrete guidelines, just imitate the existing code
(this is a good guideline, no matter which project you are
contributing to). It is always preferable to match the _local_
convention. New code added to git suite is expected to match
convention. New code added to Git suite is expected to match
the overall style of existing code. Modifications to existing
code is expected to match the style the surrounding code already
uses (even if it doesn't match the overall style of existing code).
......@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ For C programs:
- We try to keep to at most 80 characters per line.
- We try to support a wide range of C compilers to compile git with,
- We try to support a wide range of C compilers to compile Git with,
including old ones. That means that you should not use C99
initializers, even if a lot of compilers grok it.
......@@ -164,14 +164,14 @@ For C programs:
- If you are planning a new command, consider writing it in shell
or perl first, so that changes in semantics can be easily
changed and discussed. Many git commands started out like
changed and discussed. Many Git commands started out like
that, and a few are still scripts.
- Avoid introducing a new dependency into git. This means you
- Avoid introducing a new dependency into Git. This means you
usually should stay away from scripting languages not already
used in the git core command set (unless your command is clearly
used in the Git core command set (unless your command is clearly
separate from it, such as an importer to convert random-scm-X
repositories to git).
repositories to Git).
- When we pass <string, length> pair to functions, we should try to
pass them in that order.
......@@ -230,3 +230,8 @@ Writing Documentation:
valid usage. "*" has its own pair of brackets, because it can
(optionally) be specified only when one or more of the letters is
also provided.
A note on notation:
Use 'git' (all lowercase) when talking about commands i.e. something
the user would type into a shell and use 'Git' (uppercase first letter)
when talking about the version control system and its properties.
......@@ -346,8 +346,8 @@ $(patsubst %.txt,%.html,$(wildcard howto/*.txt)): %.html : %.txt
install-webdoc : html
'$(SHELL_PATH_SQ)' ./install-webdoc.sh $(WEBDOC_DEST)
# You must have a clone of git-htmldocs and git-manpages repositories
# next to the git repository itself for the following to work.
# You must have a clone of 'git-htmldocs' and 'git-manpages' repositories
# next to the 'git' repository itself for the following to work.
quick-install: quick-install-man
......
......@@ -103,9 +103,9 @@ without external resources. Instead of giving a URL to a mailing list
archive, summarize the relevant points of the discussion.
(3) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
(3) Generate your patch using Git tools out of your commits.
git based diff tools generate unidiff which is the preferred format.
Git based diff tools generate unidiff which is the preferred format.
You do not have to be afraid to use -M option to "git diff" or
"git format-patch", if your patch involves file renames. The
......@@ -122,7 +122,7 @@ that is fine, but please mark it as such.
(4) Sending your patches.
People on the git mailing list need to be able to read and
People on the Git mailing list need to be able to read and
comment on the changes you are submitting. It is important for
a developer to be able to "quote" your changes, using standard
e-mail tools, so that they may comment on specific portions of
......@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@ patch.
To improve tracking of who did what, we've borrowed the
"sign-off" procedure from the Linux kernel project on patches
that are being emailed around. Although core GIT is a lot
that are being emailed around. Although core Git is a lot
smaller project it is a good discipline to follow it.
The sign-off is a simple line at the end of the explanation for
......@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ then you just add a line saying
Signed-off-by: Random J Developer <random@developer.example.org>
This line can be automatically added by git if you run the git-commit
This line can be automatically added by Git if you run the git-commit
command with the -s option.
Notice that you can place your own Signed-off-by: line when
......@@ -337,7 +337,7 @@ Know the status of your patch after submission
tell you if your patch is merged in pu if you rebase on top of
master).
* Read the git mailing list, the maintainer regularly posts messages
* Read the Git mailing list, the maintainer regularly posts messages
entitled "What's cooking in git.git" and "What's in git.git" giving
the status of various proposed changes.
......
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
#
# Note, {0} is the manpage section, while {target} is the command.
#
# Show GIT link as: <command>(<section>); if section is defined, else just show
# Show Git link as: <command>(<section>); if section is defined, else just show
# the command.
[macros]
......
......@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ of lines before or after the line given by <start>.
running extra passes of inspection.
+
<num> is optional but it is the lower bound on the number of
alphanumeric characters that git must detect as moving/copying
alphanumeric characters that Git must detect as moving/copying
within a file for it to associate those lines with the parent
commit. The default value is 20.
......@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ commit. The default value is 20.
looks for copies from other files in any commit.
+
<num> is optional but it is the lower bound on the number of
alphanumeric characters that git must detect as moving/copying
alphanumeric characters that Git must detect as moving/copying
between files for it to associate those lines with the parent
commit. And the default value is 40. If there are more than one
`-C` options given, the <num> argument of the last `-C` will
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ diff.renameLimit::
detection; equivalent to the 'git diff' option '-l'.
diff.renames::
Tells git to detect renames. If set to any boolean value, it
Tells Git to detect renames. If set to any boolean value, it
will enable basic rename detection. If set to "copies" or
"copy", it will detect copies, as well.
......
......@@ -283,7 +283,7 @@ few lines that happen to match textually as the context, but as a
single deletion of everything old followed by a single insertion of
everything new, and the number `m` controls this aspect of the -B
option (defaults to 60%). `-B/70%` specifies that less than 30% of the
original should remain in the result for git to consider it a total
original should remain in the result for Git to consider it a total
rewrite (i.e. otherwise the resulting patch will be a series of
deletion and insertion mixed together with context lines).
+
......@@ -307,7 +307,7 @@ ifdef::git-log[]
endif::git-log[]
If `n` is specified, it is a threshold on the similarity
index (i.e. amount of addition/deletions compared to the
file's size). For example, `-M90%` means git should consider a
file's size). For example, `-M90%` means Git should consider a
delete/add pair to be a rename if more than 90% of the file
hasn't changed. Without a `%` sign, the number is to be read as
a fraction, with a decimal point before it. I.e., `-M5` becomes
......
Everyday GIT With 20 Commands Or So
Everyday Git With 20 Commands Or So
===================================
<<Individual Developer (Standalone)>> commands are essential for
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ commands in addition to the above.
<<Repository Administration>> commands are for system
administrators who are responsible for the care and feeding
of git repositories.
of Git repositories.
Individual Developer (Standalone)[[Individual Developer (Standalone)]]
......@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ $ git log v2.43.. curses/ <12>
+
<1> create a new topic branch.
<2> revert your botched changes in `curses/ux_audio_oss.c`.
<3> you need to tell git if you added a new file; removal and
<3> you need to tell Git if you added a new file; removal and
modification will be caught if you do `git commit -a` later.
<4> to see what changes you are committing.
<5> commit everything as you have tested, with your sign-off.
......@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ commands in addition to the ones needed by participants.
Examples
~~~~~~~~
My typical GIT day.::
My typical Git day.::
+
------------
$ git status <1>
......@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ Run git-daemon to serve /pub/scm from xinetd.::
------------
$ cat /etc/xinetd.d/git-daemon
# default: off
# description: The git server offers access to git repositories
# description: The Git server offers access to Git repositories
service git
{
disable = no
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Reads the supplied diff output (i.e. "a patch") and applies it to files.
With the `--index` option the patch is also applied to the index, and
with the `--cached` option the patch is only applied to the index.
Without these options, the command applies the patch only to files,
and does not require them to be in a git repository.
and does not require them to be in a Git repository.
This command applies the patch but does not create a commit. Use
linkgit:git-am[1] to create commits from patches generated by
......@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ behavior:
* `fix` outputs warnings for a few such errors, and applies the
patch after fixing them (`strip` is a synonym --- the tool
used to consider only trailing whitespace characters as errors, and the
fix involved 'stripping' them, but modern gits do more).
fix involved 'stripping' them, but modern Gits do more).
* `error` outputs warnings for a few such errors, and refuses
to apply the patch.
* `error-all` is similar to `error` but shows all errors.
......
......@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-archimport(1)
NAME
----
git-archimport - Import an Arch repository into git
git-archimport - Import an Arch repository into Git
SYNOPSIS
......@@ -40,13 +40,13 @@ directory. To follow the development of a project that uses Arch, rerun
incremental imports.
While 'git archimport' will try to create sensible branch names for the
archives that it imports, it is also possible to specify git branch names
manually. To do so, write a git branch name after each <archive/branch>
archives that it imports, it is also possible to specify Git branch names
manually. To do so, write a Git branch name after each <archive/branch>
parameter, separated by a colon. This way, you can shorten the Arch
branch names and convert Arch jargon to git jargon, for example mapping a
branch names and convert Arch jargon to Git jargon, for example mapping a
"PROJECT{litdd}devo{litdd}VERSION" branch to "master".
Associating multiple Arch branches to one git branch is possible; the
Associating multiple Arch branches to one Git branch is possible; the
result will make the most sense only if no commits are made to the first
branch, after the second branch is created. Still, this is useful to
convert Arch repositories that had been rotated periodically.
......@@ -54,14 +54,14 @@ convert Arch repositories that had been rotated periodically.
MERGES
------
Patch merge data from Arch is used to mark merges in git as well. git
Patch merge data from Arch is used to mark merges in Git as well. Git
does not care much about tracking patches, and only considers a merge when a
branch incorporates all the commits since the point they forked. The end result
is that git will have a good idea of how far branches have diverged. So the
is that Git will have a good idea of how far branches have diverged. So the
import process does lose some patch-trading metadata.
Fortunately, when you try and merge branches imported from Arch,
git will find a good merge base, and it has a good chance of identifying
Git will find a good merge base, and it has a good chance of identifying
patches that have been traded out-of-sequence between the branches.
OPTIONS
......
......@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ export-ignore::
added to archive files. See linkgit:gitattributes[5] for details.
export-subst::
If the attribute export-subst is set for a file then git will
If the attribute export-subst is set for a file then Git will
expand several placeholders when adding this file to an archive.
See linkgit:gitattributes[5] for details.
......
......@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ Note that the example that we will use is really a toy example, we
will be looking for the first commit that has a version like
"2.6.26-something", that is the commit that has a "SUBLEVEL = 26" line
in the top level Makefile. This is a toy example because there are
better ways to find this commit with git than using "git bisect" (for
better ways to find this commit with Git than using "git bisect" (for
example "git blame" or "git log -S<string>").
Driving a bisection manually
......@@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ So only the W and B commits will be kept. Because commits X and Y will
have been removed by rules a) and b) respectively, and because commits
G are removed by rule b) too.
Note for git users, that it is equivalent as keeping only the commit
Note for Git users, that it is equivalent as keeping only the commit
given by:
-------------
......@@ -710,8 +710,8 @@ Skip algorithm discussed
After step 7) (in the skip algorithm), we could check if the second
commit has been skipped and return it if it is not the case. And in
fact that was the algorithm we used from when "git bisect skip" was
developed in git version 1.5.4 (released on February 1st 2008) until
git version 1.6.4 (released July 29th 2009).
developed in Git version 1.5.4 (released on February 1st 2008) until
Git version 1.6.4 (released July 29th 2009).
But Ingo Molnar and H. Peter Anvin (another well known linux kernel
developer) both complained that sometimes the best bisection points
......@@ -1025,10 +1025,10 @@ And here is what Andreas said about this work-flow <<5>>:
_____________
To give some hard figures, we used to have an average report-to-fix
cycle of 142.6 hours (according to our somewhat weird bug-tracker
which just measures wall-clock time). Since we moved to git, we've
which just measures wall-clock time). Since we moved to Git, we've
lowered that to 16.2 hours. Primarily because we can stay on top of
the bug fixing now, and because everyone's jockeying to get to fix
bugs (we're quite proud of how lazy we are to let git find the bugs
bugs (we're quite proud of how lazy we are to let Git find the bugs
for us). Each new release results in ~40% fewer bugs (almost certainly
due to how we now feel about writing tests).
_____________
......@@ -1228,9 +1228,9 @@ commits in already released history, for example to change the commit
message or the author. And it can also be used instead of git "grafts"
to link a repository with another old repository.
In fact it's this last feature that "sold" it to the git community, so
it is now in the "master" branch of git's git repository and it should
be released in git 1.6.5 in October or November 2009.
In fact it's this last feature that "sold" it to the Git community, so
it is now in the "master" branch of Git's Git repository and it should
be released in Git 1.6.5 in October or November 2009.
One problem with "git replace" is that currently it stores all the
replacements refs in "refs/replace/", but it would be perhaps better
......@@ -1324,7 +1324,7 @@ Acknowledgements
----------------
Many thanks to Junio Hamano for his help in reviewing this paper, for
reviewing the patches I sent to the git mailing list, for discussing
reviewing the patches I sent to the Git mailing list, for discussing
some ideas and helping me improve them, for improving "git bisect" a
lot and for his awesome work in maintaining and developing Git.
......@@ -1337,7 +1337,7 @@ Many thanks to Linus Torvalds for inventing, developing and
evangelizing "git bisect", Git and Linux.
Many thanks to the many other great people who helped one way or
another when I worked on git, especially to Andreas Ericsson, Johannes
another when I worked on Git, especially to Andreas Ericsson, Johannes
Schindelin, H. Peter Anvin, Daniel Barkalow, Bill Lear, John Hawley,
Shawn O. Pierce, Jeff King, Sam Vilain, Jon Seymour.
......
......@@ -169,14 +169,14 @@ the revision as good or bad in the usual manner.
Bisect skip
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you can ask git
Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you can ask Git
to do it for you by issuing the command:
------------
$ git bisect skip # Current version cannot be tested
------------
But git may eventually be unable to tell the first bad commit among
But Git may eventually be unable to tell the first bad commit among
a bad commit and one or more skipped commits.
You can even skip a range of commits, instead of just one commit,
......
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ The report does not tell you anything about lines which have been deleted or
replaced; you need to use a tool such as 'git diff' or the "pickaxe"
interface briefly mentioned in the following paragraph.
Apart from supporting file annotation, git also supports searching the
Apart from supporting file annotation, Git also supports searching the
development history for when a code snippet occurred in a change. This makes it
possible to track when a code snippet was added to a file, moved or copied
between files, and eventually deleted or replaced. It works by searching for
......
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ Note that this will create the new branch, but it will not switch the
working tree to it; use "git checkout <newbranch>" to switch to the
new branch.
When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, git sets up the
When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, Git sets up the
branch so that 'git pull' will appropriately merge from
the remote-tracking branch. This behavior may be changed via the global
`branch.autosetupmerge` configuration flag. That setting can be
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Some workflows require that one or more branches of development on one
machine be replicated on another machine, but the two machines cannot
be directly connected, and therefore the interactive git protocols (git,
be directly connected, and therefore the interactive Git protocols (git,
ssh, rsync, http) cannot be used. This command provides support for
'git fetch' and 'git pull' to operate by packaging objects and references
in an archive at the originating machine, then importing those into
......
......@@ -18,14 +18,14 @@ DESCRIPTION
Checks if a given 'refname' is acceptable, and exits with a non-zero
status if it is not.
A reference is used in git to specify branches and tags. A
A reference is used in Git to specify branches and tags. A
branch head is stored in the `refs/heads` hierarchy, while
a tag is stored in the `refs/tags` hierarchy of the ref namespace
(typically in `$GIT_DIR/refs/heads` and `$GIT_DIR/refs/tags`
directories or, as entries in file `$GIT_DIR/packed-refs`
if refs are packed by `git gc`).
git imposes the following rules on how references are named:
Git imposes the following rules on how references are named:
. They can include slash `/` for hierarchical (directory)
grouping, but no slash-separated component can begin with a
......
......@@ -333,7 +333,7 @@ a---b---c---d branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
tag 'v2.0' (refers to commit 'b')
------------
In fact, we can perform all the normal git operations. But, let's look
In fact, we can perform all the normal Git operations. But, let's look
at what happens when we then checkout master:
------------
......@@ -350,7 +350,7 @@ a---b---c---d branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
It is important to realize that at this point nothing refers to commit
'f'. Eventually commit 'f' (and by extension commit 'e') will be deleted
by the routine git garbage collection process, unless we create a reference
by the routine Git garbage collection process, unless we create a reference
before that happens. If we have not yet moved away from commit 'f',
any of these will create a reference to it:
......
......@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Cleans the working tree by recursively removing files that are not
under version control, starting from the current directory.
Normally, only files unknown to git are removed, but if the '-x'
Normally, only files unknown to Git are removed, but if the '-x'
option is specified, ignored files are also removed. This can, for
example, be useful to remove all build products.
......@@ -27,13 +27,13 @@ OPTIONS
-------
-d::
Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files.
If an untracked directory is managed by a different git
If an untracked directory is managed by a different Git
repository, it is not removed by default. Use -f option twice
if you really want to remove such a directory.
-f::
--force::
If the git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set
If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set
to false, 'git clean' will refuse to run unless given -f or -n.
-n::
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ OPTIONS
working directory to test a clean build.
-X::
Remove only files ignored by git. This may be useful to rebuild
Remove only files ignored by Git. This may be useful to rebuild
everything from scratch, but keep manually created files.
SEE ALSO
......
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ OPTIONS
--local::
-l::
When the repository to clone from is on a local machine,
this flag bypasses the normal "git aware" transport
this flag bypasses the normal "Git aware" transport
mechanism and clones the repository by making a copy of
HEAD and everything under objects and refs directories.
The files under `.git/objects/` directory are hardlinked
......@@ -54,11 +54,11 @@ this is the default, and --local is essentially a no-op. If the
repository is specified as a URL, then this flag is ignored (and we
never use the local optimizations). Specifying `--no-local` will
override the default when `/path/to/repo` is given, using the regular
git transport instead.
Git transport instead.
+
To force copying instead of hardlinking (which may be desirable if you
are trying to make a back-up of your repository), but still avoid the
usual "git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
usual "Git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
--no-hardlinks::
Optimize the cloning process from a repository on a
......@@ -76,9 +76,9 @@ usual "git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
*NOTE*: this is a possibly dangerous operation; do *not* use
it unless you understand what it does. If you clone your
repository using this option and then delete branches (or use any
other git command that makes any existing commit unreferenced) in the
other Git command that makes any existing commit unreferenced) in the
source repository, some objects may become unreferenced (or dangling).
These objects may be removed by normal git operations (such as `git commit`)
These objects may be removed by normal Git operations (such as `git commit`)
which automatically call `git gc --auto`. (See linkgit:git-gc[1].)
If these objects are removed and were referenced by the cloned repository,
then the cloned repository will become corrupt.
......@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ objects from the source repository into a pack in the cloned repository.
No checkout of HEAD is performed after the clone is complete.
--bare::
Make a 'bare' GIT repository. That is, instead of
Make a 'bare' Git repository. That is, instead of
creating `<directory>` and placing the administrative
files in `<directory>/.git`, make the `<directory>`
itself the `$GIT_DIR`. This obviously implies the `-n`
......@@ -213,8 +213,8 @@ objects from the source repository into a pack in the cloned repository.
--separate-git-dir=<git dir>::
Instead of placing the cloned repository where it is supposed
to be, place the cloned repository at the specified directory,
then make a filesytem-agnostic git symbolic link to there.
The result is git repository can be separated from working
then make a filesytem-agnostic Git symbolic link to there.
The result is Git repository can be separated from working
tree.
......
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ While a tree represents a particular directory state of a working
directory, a commit represents that state in "time", and explains how
to get there.
Normally a commit would identify a new "HEAD" state, and while git
Normally a commit would identify a new "HEAD" state, and while Git
doesn't care where you save the note about that state, in practice we
tend to just write the result to the file that is pointed at by
`.git/HEAD`, so that we can always see what the last committed
......
......@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ The content to be added can be specified in several ways:
3. by listing files as arguments to the 'commit' command, in which
case the commit will ignore changes staged in the index, and instead
record the current content of the listed files (which must already
be known to git);
be known to Git);
4. by using the -a switch with the 'commit' command to automatically
"add" changes from all known files (i.e. all files that are already
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ OPTIONS
--all::
Tell the command to automatically stage files that have
been modified and deleted, but new files you have not
told git about are not affected.
told Git about are not affected.
-p::
--patch::
......@@ -404,7 +404,7 @@ Though not required, it's a good idea to begin the commit message
with a single short (less than 50 character) line summarizing the
change, followed by a blank line and then a more thorough description.
The text up to the first blank line in a commit message is treated
as the commit title, and that title is used throughout git.
as the commit title, and that title is used throughout Git.
For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a commit into email, and it uses
the title on the Subject line and the rest of the commit in the body.
......
......@@ -14,13 +14,13 @@ git config credential.helper 'cache [options]'
DESCRIPTION
-----------
This command caches credentials in memory for use by future git
This command caches credentials in memory for use by future Git
programs. The stored credentials never touch the disk, and are forgotten
after a configurable timeout. The cache is accessible over a Unix
domain socket, restricted to the current user by filesystem permissions.
You probably don't want to invoke this command directly; it is meant to
be used as a credential helper by other parts of git. See
be used as a credential helper by other parts of Git. See
linkgit:gitcredentials[7] or `EXAMPLES` below.
OPTIONS
......
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ security tradeoff, try linkgit:git-credential-cache[1], or find a helper
that integrates with secure storage provided by your operating system.
This command stores credentials indefinitely on disk for use by future
git programs.
Git programs.
You probably don't want to invoke this command directly; it is meant to
be used as a credential helper by other parts of git. See
......@@ -63,11 +63,11 @@ stored on its own line as a URL like:
https://user:pass@example.com
------------------------------
When git needs authentication for a particular URL context,
When Git needs authentication for a particular URL context,
credential-store will consider that context a pattern to match against
each entry in the credentials file. If the protocol, hostname, and
username (if we already have one) match, then the password is returned
to git. See the discussion of configuration in linkgit:gitcredentials[7]
to Git. See the discussion of configuration in linkgit:gitcredentials[7]
for more information.
GIT
......
......@@ -18,9 +18,9 @@ Git has an internal interface for storing and retrieving credentials
from system-specific helpers, as well as prompting the user for
usernames and passwords. The git-credential command exposes this
interface to scripts which may want to retrieve, store, or prompt for
credentials in the same manner as git. The design of this scriptable
credentials in the same manner as Git. The design of this scriptable
interface models the internal C API; see
link:technical/api-credentials.txt[the git credential API] for more
link:technical/api-credentials.txt[the Git credential API] for more
background on the concepts.
git-credential takes an "action" option on the command-line (one of
......@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ infomation it has):
password=secr3t
+
In most cases, this means the attributes given in the input will be
repeated in the output, but git may also modify the credential
repeated in the output, but Git may also modify the credential
description, for example by removing the `path` attribute when the
protocol is HTTP(s) and `credential.useHttpPath` is false.
+
......
......@@ -15,8 +15,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
Exports a commit from GIT to a CVS checkout, making it easier
to merge patches from a git repository into a CVS repository.
Exports a commit from Git to a CVS checkout, making it easier
to merge patches from a Git repository into a CVS repository.
Specify the name of a CVS checkout using the -w switch or execute it
from the root of the CVS working copy. In the latter case GIT_DIR must
......@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ OPTIONS
-w::
Specify the location of the CVS checkout to use for the export. This
option does not require GIT_DIR to be set before execution if the
current directory is within a git repository. The default is the
current directory is within a Git repository. The default is the
value of 'cvsexportcommit.cvsdir'.
-W::
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ performing a one-shot import of a CVS repository consider using
link:http://cvs2svn.tigris.org/cvs2git.html[cvs2git] or
link:https://github.com/BartMassey/parsecvs[parsecvs].
Imports a CVS repository into git. It will either create a new
Imports a CVS repository into Git. It will either create a new
repository, or incrementally import into an existing one.
Splitting the CVS log into patch sets is done by 'cvsps'.
......@@ -65,18 +65,18 @@ OPTIONS
`CVS/Repository`.
-C <target-dir>::
The git repository to import to. If the directory doesn't
The Git repository to import to. If the directory doesn't
exist, it will be created. Default is the current directory.
-r <remote>::
The git remote to import this CVS repository into.
The Git remote to import this CVS repository into.
Moves all CVS branches into remotes/<remote>/<branch>
akin to the way 'git clone' uses 'origin' by default.
-o <branch-for-HEAD>::
When no remote is specified (via -r) the 'HEAD' branch
from CVS is imported to the 'origin' branch within the git
repository, as 'HEAD' already has a special meaning for git.
from CVS is imported to the 'origin' branch within the Git
repository, as 'HEAD' already has a special meaning for Git.
When a remote is specified the 'HEAD' branch is named
remotes/<remote>/master mirroring 'git clone' behaviour.
Use this option if you want to import into a different
......
......@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-cvsserver(1)
NAME
----
git-cvsserver - A CVS server emulator for git
git-cvsserver - A CVS server emulator for Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ unless '--export-all' was given, too.
DESCRIPTION
-----------
This application is a CVS emulation layer for git.
This application is a CVS emulation layer for Git.
It is highly functional. However, not all methods are implemented,
and for those methods that are implemented,
......@@ -72,9 +72,9 @@ plugin. Most functionality works fine with both of these clients.
LIMITATIONS
-----------
CVS clients cannot tag, branch or perform GIT merges.
CVS clients cannot tag, branch or perform Git merges.
'git-cvsserver' maps GIT branches to CVS modules. This is very different
'git-cvsserver' maps Git branches to CVS modules. This is very different
from what most CVS users would expect since in CVS modules usually represent
one or more directories.
......@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ Then provide your password via the pserver method, for example:
------
cvs -d:pserver:someuser:somepassword <at> server/path/repo.git co <HEAD_name>
------
No special setup is needed for SSH access, other than having GIT tools
No special setup is needed for SSH access, other than having Git tools
in the PATH. If you have clients that do not accept the CVS_SERVER
environment variable, you can rename 'git-cvsserver' to `cvs`.