Commit 7d5bf87b authored by Junio C Hamano's avatar Junio C Hamano

SubmittingPatches: remove overlong checklist

The section is no longer a concise checklist.  It also talks about
things that are not covered in the "Long version" text, which means
people need to read both, covering more or less the same thing in
different phrasing.

Fold the details into the main text and remove the section.
Signed-off-by: default avatarJunio C Hamano <[email protected]>
parent e6da8ee8
Checklist (and a short version for the impatient):
Commits:
- make commits of logical units
- check for unnecessary whitespace with "git diff --check"
before committing
- do not check in commented out code or unneeded files
- the first line of the commit message should be a short
description (50 characters is the soft limit, see DISCUSSION
in git-commit(1)), and should skip the full stop
- it is also conventional in most cases to prefix the
first line with "area: " where the area is a filename
or identifier for the general area of the code being
modified, e.g.
. archive: ustar header checksum is computed unsigned
. git-cherry-pick.txt: clarify the use of revision range notation
(if in doubt which identifier to use, run "git log --no-merges"
on the files you are modifying to see the current conventions)
- the body should provide a meaningful commit message, which:
. explains the problem the change tries to solve, iow, what
is wrong with the current code without the change.
. justifies the way the change solves the problem, iow, why
the result with the change is better.
. alternate solutions considered but discarded, if any.
- describe changes in imperative mood, e.g. "make xyzzy do frotz"
instead of "[This patch] makes xyzzy do frotz" or "[I] changed
xyzzy to do frotz", as if you are giving orders to the codebase
to change its behaviour.
- try to make sure your explanation can be understood without
external resources. Instead of giving a URL to a mailing list
archive, summarize the relevant points of the discussion.
- add a "Signed-off-by: Your Name <[email protected]>" line to the
commit message (or just use the option "-s" when committing)
to confirm that you agree to the Developer's Certificate of Origin
- make sure that you have tests for the bug you are fixing
- make sure that the test suite passes after your commit
Patch:
- use "git format-patch -M" to create the patch
- do not PGP sign your patch
- do not attach your patch, but read in the mail
body, unless you cannot teach your mailer to
leave the formatting of the patch alone.
- be careful doing cut & paste into your mailer, not to
corrupt whitespaces.
- provide additional information (which is unsuitable for
the commit message) between the "---" and the diffstat
- if you change, add, or remove a command line option or
make some other user interface change, the associated
documentation should be updated as well.
- if your name is not writable in ASCII, make sure that
you send off a message in the correct encoding.
- send the patch to the list ([email protected]) and the
maintainer ([email protected]) if (and only if) the patch
is ready for inclusion. If you use git-send-email(1),
please test it first by sending email to yourself.
- see below for instructions specific to your mailer
Long version:
Here are some guidelines for people who want to contribute their code
to this software.
......@@ -119,13 +57,53 @@ change, the approach taken by the change, and if relevant how this
differs substantially from the prior version, are all good things
to have.
Make sure that you have tests for the bug you are fixing.
When adding a new feature, make sure that you have new tests to show
the feature triggers the new behaviour when it should, and to show the
feature does not trigger when it shouldn't. Also make sure that the
test suite passes after your commit. Do not forget to update the
documentation to describe the updated behaviour.
Oh, another thing. I am picky about whitespaces. Make sure your
changes do not trigger errors with the sample pre-commit hook shipped
in templates/hooks--pre-commit. To help ensure this does not happen,
run git diff --check on your changes before you commit.
(2) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
(2) Describe your changes well.
The first line of the commit message should be a short description (50
characters is the soft limit, see DISCUSSION in git-commit(1)), and
should skip the full stop. It is also conventional in most cases to
prefix the first line with "area: " where the area is a filename or
identifier for the general area of the code being modified, e.g.
. archive: ustar header checksum is computed unsigned
. git-cherry-pick.txt: clarify the use of revision range notation
If in doubt which identifier to use, run "git log --no-merges" on the
files you are modifying to see the current conventions.
The body should provide a meaningful commit message, which:
. explains the problem the change tries to solve, iow, what is wrong
with the current code without the change.
. justifies the way the change solves the problem, iow, why the
result with the change is better.
. alternate solutions considered but discarded, if any.
Describe your changes in imperative mood, e.g. "make xyzzy do frotz"
instead of "[This patch] makes xyzzy do frotz" or "[I] changed xyzzy
to do frotz", as if you are giving orders to the codebase to change
its behaviour. Try to make sure your explanation can be understood
without external resources. Instead of giving a URL to a mailing list
archive, summarize the relevant points of the discussion.
(3) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
git based diff tools generate unidiff which is the preferred format.
......@@ -133,22 +111,27 @@ You do not have to be afraid to use -M option to "git diff" or
"git format-patch", if your patch involves file renames. The
receiving end can handle them just fine.
Please make sure your patch does not include any extra files
which do not belong in a patch submission. Make sure to review
Please make sure your patch does not add commented out debugging code,
or include any extra files which do not relate to what your patch
is trying to achieve. Make sure to review
your patch after generating it, to ensure accuracy. Before
sending out, please make sure it cleanly applies to the "master"
branch head. If you are preparing a work based on "next" branch,
that is fine, but please mark it as such.
(3) Sending your patches.
(4) Sending your patches.
People on the git mailing list need to be able to read and
comment on the changes you are submitting. It is important for
a developer to be able to "quote" your changes, using standard
e-mail tools, so that they may comment on specific portions of
your code. For this reason, all patches should be submitted
"inline". WARNING: Be wary of your MUAs word-wrap
"inline". If your log message (including your name on the
Signed-off-by line) is not writable in ASCII, make sure that
you send off a message in the correct encoding.
WARNING: Be wary of your MUAs word-wrap
corrupting your patch. Do not cut-n-paste your patch; you can
lose tabs that way if you are not careful.
......@@ -200,19 +183,21 @@ patch, format it as "multipart/signed", not a text/plain message
that starts with '-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----'. That is
not a text/plain, it's something else.
Unless your patch is a very trivial and an obviously correct one,
first send it with "To:" set to the mailing list, with "cc:" listing
Send your patch with "To:" set to the mailing list, with "cc:" listing
people who are involved in the area you are touching (the output from
"git blame $path" and "git shortlog --no-merges $path" would help to
identify them), to solicit comments and reviews. After the list
reached a consensus that it is a good idea to apply the patch, re-send
it with "To:" set to the maintainer and optionally "cc:" the list for
inclusion. Do not forget to add trailers such as "Acked-by:",
"Reviewed-by:" and "Tested-by:" after your "Signed-off-by:" line as
necessary.
identify them), to solicit comments and reviews.
After the list reached a consensus that it is a good idea to apply the
patch, re-send it with "To:" set to the maintainer and "cc:" the
list for inclusion.
Do not forget to add trailers such as "Acked-by:", "Reviewed-by:" and
"Tested-by:" lines as necessary to credit people who helped your
patch.
(4) Sign your work
(5) Sign your work
To improve tracking of who did what, we've borrowed the
"sign-off" procedure from the Linux kernel project on patches
......
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