Commit 46869af0 authored by nasciiboy's avatar nasciiboy

-------------------------------------------------------

   po hero (REBOOT II½) < Counting: Repetition
                                          and Regexps
-------------------------------------------------------
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.html
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.porg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.html
-------------------------------------------------------
Sonic-Boom
-------------------------------------------------------
   MGMT               : Little Dark Age
   Moby               : Animal Rights
   Astor Piazzolla    ! Zero Hour
   Psychic Lemon      ! Frequency Rhythm Distortion D.
   The Crystal Method ! Born too Slow
-------------------------------------------------------
parent 3eb1686b
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -6649,7 +6649,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
kill ring is reached, it is replaced by the first element and the cycle is
repeated. (Thus the kill ring is called a ‘ring’ rather than just a
‘list’. However, the actual data structure that holds the text is a list.
See Section @l{#Appendix B Handling the Kill Ring}, for the details of how
See Section @l{#Appendix B: Handling the Kill Ring}, for the details of how
the list is handled as a ring.)
** Kill Ring Overview
......@@ -8409,11 +8409,11 @@ promoting software freedom.”
TAB SPC
< example..
Here, @'{$} indicates the end of the line, and I have pointed out where
Here, @'c{$} indicates the end of the line, and I have pointed out where
the tab and two spaces are inserted in the expression. Both are inserted
by putting the actual characters into the expression.
Two backslashes, @'{\\}, are required before the parentheses and vertical
Two backslashes, @'c{\\}, are required before the parentheses and vertical
bars: the first backslash quotes the following backslash in Emacs; and the
second indicates that the following character, the parenthesis or the
vertical bar, is special.
......@@ -8441,9 +8441,9 @@ promoting software freedom.”
< example..
In this expression, the first @'{]} is the first character in the
expression; the second character is @'{"}, which is preceded by a @'{\} to
tell Emacs the @'{"} is @e{not} special. The last three characters are
@'{'}, @'{)}, and @'(}).
expression; the second character is @'c{"}, which is preceded by a @'c{\} to
tell Emacs the @'c{"} is @e{not} special. The last three characters are
@'c{'}, @'c{)}, and @'c(}).
All this suggests what the regular expression pattern for matching the end
of a sentence should be; and, indeed, if we evaluate @c{sentence-end} we
......@@ -8543,7 +8543,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
The variable ‘sentence-end’ is a regular expression that matches ends of
sentences. Also, every paragraph boundary terminates sentences as well."
(interactive "p")
(or arg (setq arg 1))
(let ((opoint (point))
......@@ -8814,7 +8813,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
@c{sp-parstart}, @c{start}, and @c{found-start}.
The variable @c{parsep} appears twice, first, to remove instances of
@'{^}, and second, to handle fill prefixes.
@'c{^}, and second, to handle fill prefixes.
The variable @c{opoint} is just the value of @c{point}. As you can
guess, it is used in a @c{constrain-to-field} expression, just as in
......@@ -8881,7 +8880,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
fill prefix exists. Otherwise, the variable will be set to @c{nil}.
The next two local variables in the @c{let*} expression are designed to
remove instances of @'{^} from @c{parstart} and @c{parsep}, the local
remove instances of @'c{^} from @c{parstart} and @c{parsep}, the local
variables which indicate the paragraph start and the paragraph separator.
The next expression sets @c{parsep} again. That is to handle fill
prefixes.
......@@ -9141,7 +9140,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
To create a @f{TAGS} file, first switch to the directory in which you want
to create the file. In Emacs you can do this with the @k{M-x cd} command,
or by visiting a file in the directory, or by listing the directory with
@k{C-x d} @%c(dired). Then run the compile command, with @c{etags *.el}
@k{C-x d} @%c(dired). Then run the @c(compile) command, with @${etags *.el}
as the command to execute
..example >
......@@ -9180,7 +9179,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
recognizes the language in an input file according to its file name and
contents.
@f{etags} is very helpful when you are writing code yourself and want to
@${etags} is very helpful when you are writing code yourself and want to
refer back to functions you have already written. Just run @${etags}
again at intervals as you write new functions, so they become part of the
@f{TAGS} file.
......@@ -9216,7 +9215,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
(The @${make tags} command works well with the GNU Emacs sources, as well
as with some other source packages.)
For more information, see Section @l{https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_mono/emacs.html#Tags<>Tag Tables} in
For more information, see Section @l{https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_mono/emacs.html#Tags Tables<>Tag Tables} in
@e(The GNU Emacs Manual).
** Review
......@@ -9263,7 +9262,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
4. Optionally, how many times to repeat the search; if negative, the
search goes backwards.
- @c(let*) ::
Bind some variables locally to particular values, and then evaluate the
......@@ -9275,7 +9273,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
..srci > elisp
> (let* ((foo 7)
^ (bar (* 3 foo)))
^ (bar (* 3 foo)))
^ (message "`bar' is %d." bar))
‘bar’ is 21.
< srci..
......@@ -9308,7 +9306,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
expression) to match a string that is composed of two identical halves.
You can devise several regexps; some are better than others. The
function I use is described in an appendix, along with several regexps.
See Section @l{#Appendix A The @c{the-the} Function}.
See Section @l{#Appendix A: The @c{the-the} Function}.
* Counting: Repetition and Regexps
......@@ -11748,7 +11746,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
@c{print-graph-body} function that automatically print labels for the
horizontal and vertical axes. Since the label printing functions do not
contain much new material, I have placed their description in an appendix.
See Section @l{#Appendix C A Graph with Labeled Axes}.
See Section @l{#Appendix C: A Graph with Labeled Axes}.
** Exercise
......@@ -13369,7 +13367,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
What you have done is learn enough for much practical work with GNU Emacs.
What you have done is get started. This is the end of a beginning.
* Appendix A The @c{the-the} Function
* Appendix A: The @c{the-the} Function
Sometimes when you you write text, you duplicate words––as with “you you”
near the beginning of this sentence. I find that most frequently, I
......@@ -13450,7 +13448,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
You can substitute the other regular expressions shown above in the
function definition and try each of them on this list.
* Appendix B Handling the Kill Ring
* Appendix B: Handling the Kill Ring
The kill ring is a list that is transformed into a ring by the workings of
the @c{current-kill} function. The @c{yank} and @c{yank-pop} commands use
......@@ -13897,7 +13895,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
@c{kill-ring-yank-pointer} do not use this library, possibly because they
were written earlier.
* Appendix C A Graph with Labeled Axes
* Appendix C: A Graph with Labeled Axes
Printed axes help you understand a graph. They convey scale. In an
earlier chapter (see Section @l{#Readying a Graph}), we wrote the code to
......@@ -14627,7 +14625,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
Now we are nearly ready to print the whole graph.
The function to print the graph with the proper labels follows the outline
we created earlier (see Section @l{#Appendix C<>A Graph with Labeled Axes}),
we created earlier (see Section @l{#Appendix C: A Graph with Labeled Axes}),
but with additions.
Here is the outline:
......@@ -15135,7 +15133,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
The largest group of functions contain 10--19 words and symbols each.
* Appendix D Free Software and Free Manuals @%b(by Richard M. Stallman)
* Appendix D: Free Software and Free Manuals @%b(by Richard M. Stallman)
The biggest deficiency in free operating systems is not in the software––it
is the lack of good free manuals that we can include in these systems.
......@@ -15247,7 +15245,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
lists free books available from other publishers:
@l{http://www.gnu.org/doc/other-free-books.html}
* Appendix E GNU Free Documentation License
* Appendix E: GNU Free Documentation License
..center >
Version 1.3, 3 November 2008
......
This diff is collapsed.
This diff is collapsed.
This diff is collapsed.
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment