Commit 3eb1686b authored by nasciiboy's avatar nasciiboy

-------------------------------------------------------

   po hero (REBOOT II½) < Regular Expression Searches
-------------------------------------------------------
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.html
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.porg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.html
   modified:   worg-data/worg.css
-------------------------------------------------------
Sonic-Boom
-------------------------------------------------------
   The Crystal Method    ! Drive Nike Original Run
   Gary Moore            ! Spanish Guitar
                         ! We Want Moore!
   Cowboy Bebop CD-BOX   : Disc 4
-------------------------------------------------------
parent f9212ffe
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -6417,8 +6417,8 @@ promoting software freedom.”
In Lisp, atoms are recorded in a straightforward fashion; if the
implementation is not straightforward in practice, it is, nonetheless,
straightforward in theory. The atom @'{rose}, for example, is recorded as
the four contiguous letters @'{r}, @'{o}, @'{s}, @'{e}. A list, on the
straightforward in theory. The atom @'c{rose}, for example, is recorded as
the four contiguous letters @'c{r}, @'c{o}, @'c{s}, @'c{e}. A list, on the
other hand, is kept differently. The mechanism is equally simple, but it
takes a moment to get used to the idea. A list is kept using a series of
pairs of pointers. In the series, the first pointer in each pair points to
......@@ -6429,12 +6429,12 @@ promoting software freedom.”
to. Hence, a list is kept as a series of electronic addresses.
For example, the list @c{(rose violet buttercup)} has three elements,
@'{rose}, @'{violet}, and @'{buttercup}. In the computer, the electronic
address of @'{rose} is recorded in a segment of computer memory along with
the address that gives the electronic address of where the atom @'{violet}
is located; and that address (the one that tells where @'{violet} is
@'c{rose}, @'c{violet}, and @'c{buttercup}. In the computer, the electronic
address of @'c{rose} is recorded in a segment of computer memory along with
the address that gives the electronic address of where the atom @'c{violet}
is located; and that address (the one that tells where @'c{violet} is
located) is kept along with an address that tells where the address for the
atom @'{buttercup} is located.
atom @'c{buttercup} is located.
This sounds more complicated than it is and is easier seen in a diagram:
......@@ -6450,9 +6450,9 @@ promoting software freedom.”
Lisp object, usually in the form of a memory address. The boxes, i.e., the
addresses, are in pairs. Each arrow points to what the address is the
address of, either an atom or another pair of addresses. The first box is
the electronic address of @'{rose} and the arrow points to @'{rose}; the
the electronic address of @'c{rose} and the arrow points to @'c{rose}; the
second box is the address of the next pair of boxes, the first part of
which is the address of @'{violet} and the second part of which is the
which is the address of @'c{violet} and the second part of which is the
address of the next pair. The very last box points to the symbol @c{nil},
which marks the end of the list.
......@@ -6601,28 +6601,28 @@ promoting software freedom.”
Here is a fanciful representation:
..art >
Chest of Drawers Contents of Drawers
__ o0O0o __
/ \
---------------------
| directions to | [map to]
| symbol name | bouquet
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to |
| symbol definition | [none]
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to | [map to]
| variable value | (rose violet buttercup)
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to |
| property list | [not described here]
| |
+---------------------+
|/ \|
Chest of Drawers Contents of Drawers
__ o0O0o __
/ \
---------------------
| directions to | [map to]
| symbol name | bouquet
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to |
| symbol definition | [none]
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to | [map to]
| variable value | (rose violet buttercup)
| |
+---------------------+
| directions to |
| property list | [not described here]
| |
+---------------------+
|/ \|
< art..
......@@ -6661,7 +6661,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
< src..
If this were the contents of my kill ring and I pressed @k{C-y}, the
string of characters saying @'{some text} would be inserted in this buffer
string of characters saying @'c{some text} would be inserted in this buffer
where my cursor is located.
The @c{yank} command is also used for duplicating text by copying it. The
......@@ -6864,7 +6864,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
animals
< src..
Thus, to create a @c{while} loop that tests whether there are any items
in the list @c{animals}, the first part of the loop will be written like
this:
......@@ -7234,7 +7233,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
(triangle 7)
< src..
The sum of the first four numbers is 10 and the sum of the first seven
numbers is 28.
......@@ -7443,8 +7441,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
(reverse-list-with-while animals)
< src..
And here is how you could use the @c{dolist} macro:
..src > elisp
......@@ -7739,7 +7735,6 @@ promoting software freedom.”
(triangle-recursively 7)
< src..
You can install this function by evaluating it and then try it by
evaluating @c{(triangle-recursively 7)}. (Remember to put your cursor
immediately after the last parenthesis of the function definition, before
......@@ -7772,12 +7767,12 @@ promoting software freedom.”
evaluated first; then the other parts in sequence. Here are the steps
in detail:
- Step 1 Evaluate the innermost expression. ::
- Step 1 Evaluate the innermost expression.
The innermost expression is @c{(1- number)} so Emacs decrements the
value of @c{number} from 2 to 1.
- Step 2 Evaluate the @c{triangle-recursively} function. ::
- Step 2 Evaluate the @c{triangle-recursively} function.
The Lisp interpreter creates an individual instance of
@c{triangle-recursively}. It does not matter that this function is
......@@ -7789,12 +7784,12 @@ promoting software freedom.”
argument of 1. This means that this evaluation of
@c{triangle-recursively} returns 1.
- Step 3 Evaluate the value of @c{number}. ::
- Step 3 Evaluate the value of @c{number}.
The variable @c{numero} is the second element of the list that starts
with @c{+}; its value is 2.
- Step 4 Evaluate the @c{+} expression. ::
- Step 4 Evaluate the @c{+} expression.
The @c{+} expression receives two arguments, the first from the
evaluation of @c{number} (Step 3) and the second from the evaluation
......@@ -7808,19 +7803,19 @@ promoting software freedom.”
Suppose that @c{triangle-recursively} is called with an argument of 3.
- Step 1 Evaluate the do-again-test. ::
- Step 1 Evaluate the do-again-test.
The @c{if} expression is evaluated first. This is the do-again-test
and returns false, so the else-part of the @c{if} expression is
evaluated. (Note that in this example, the do-again-test causes the
function to call itself when it tests false, not when it tests true.)
- Step 2 Evaluate the innermost expression of the else-part. ::
- Step 2 Evaluate the innermost expression of the else-part.
The innermost expression of the else-part is evaluated, which
decrements 3 to 2. This is the next-step-expression.
- Step 3 Evaluate the @c{triangle-recursively} function. ::
- Step 3 Evaluate the @c{triangle-recursively} function.
The number 2 is passed to the @c{triangle-recursively} function.
......@@ -7829,7 +7824,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
the sequence of actions described earlier, it returns a value of 3.
So that is what will happen here.
- Step 4 Evaluate the addition. ::
- Step 4 Evaluate the addition.
3 will be passed as an argument to the addition and will be added to
the number with which the function was called, which is 3.
......@@ -8348,7 +8343,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
@%c{describe-function} to find out how to make the command go
backwards.
For more information, see Section @l{info:texinfo#Indicating<>Indicating
For more information, see Section @l{https://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/manual/texinfo/texinfo.html#Indicating<>Indicating
Definitions} in the @e{Texinfo Manual}, which goes to a Texinfo manual
in the current directory. Or, if you are on the Internet, see
@l{http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/manual/texinfo/}
......
This source diff could not be displayed because it is too large. You can view the blob instead.
This diff is collapsed.
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ pre { overflow: auto;
padding: .5em 1em; border-radius: 1.2em;
}
pre.art { font-size: .7em; line-height: 1em;
pre.art { font-size: 1em; line-height: 1em;
display: flex;
justify-content: center;
}
......@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@ pre.code { font-size: 1.07em; line-height: 1.2em;
pre.code code { padding: 0em; }
/* CODE */
pre.srci { font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.1em; }
pre.srci { font-size: 1.03em; line-height: 1.45em; }
pre.srci code { padding: 0em; }
.prompt { color: green; font-weight: 900; }
......@@ -282,6 +282,16 @@ pre.srci code { padding: 0em; }
.in { color: #0ff; }
.out { color: #aff; }
.prompt, .out {
-webkit-touch-callout: none; /* iOS Safari */
-webkit-user-select: none; /* Safari */
-khtml-user-select: none; /* Konqueror HTML */
-moz-user-select: none; /* Firefox */
-ms-user-select: none; /* Internet Explorer/Edge */
user-select: none; /* Non-prefixed version, currently
supported by Chrome and Opera */
}
/* ==fanciCode== pygments compatible */
.hll { background-color: #ffffcc }
.c { color: #99968b; font-style: italic} /* Comment */
......@@ -331,7 +341,7 @@ pre.srci code { padding: 0em; }
.nt { color: #8ac6f2} /* Name.Tag */
.nv { color: #cae682} /* Name.Variable */
.ow { color: #f6f3e8} /* Operator.Word */
.w { color: #f6f3e8} /* Text.Whitespace */
.w { color: #f6f3e8} /* Text.Whitespace */
.mf { color: #e5786d} /* Literal.Number.Float */
.mh { color: #e5786d} /* Literal.Number.Hex */
.mi { color: #e5786d} /* Literal.Number.Integer */
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment