Commit 1af809b1 authored by nasciiboy's avatar nasciiboy

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   po hero (REBOOT II½) < Narrowing and Widening
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   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro.html
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.porg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.morg
   modified:   emacs-lisp-intro_es.html
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Sonic-Boom
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   Megalobox          ! Original Soundtrack
   The Who            ! The Who By Numbers
   Gorillaz           : The Now Now
   The Crystal Method : Vegas
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parent 9b972097
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......@@ -2974,7 +2974,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
To create a @f{TAGS} file in a specific directory, switch to that
directory in Emacs using @k{M-x cd} command, or list the directory with
@k{C-x d} @%c(dired). Then run the compile command, with @c{etags *.el}
@k{C-x d} @%c(dired). Then run the @c(compile) command, with @c{etags *.el}
as the command to execute:
..example >
......@@ -2995,7 +2995,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
abbreviations and other typing shortcuts, and @f{help.el} for on-line
help. (Sometimes several libraries provide code for a single activity, as
the various @f{rmail…} files provide code for reading electronic mail.)
In @q{The GNU Emacs Manual}, you will see sentences such as “The @k{C-h p}
In @e{The GNU Emacs Manual}, you will see sentences such as “The @k{C-h p}
command lets you search the standard Emacs Lisp libraries by topic
keywords.”
......@@ -3138,7 +3138,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
< src..
Here is how the function works: the name of the function is
@c{mark-whole-buffer}; it is followed by an empty argument list, @'{()},
@c{mark-whole-buffer}; it is followed by an empty argument list, @'c{()},
which means that the function does not require arguments. The
documentation comes next.
......@@ -3721,7 +3721,7 @@ promoting software freedom.”
*** The Interactive Expression in @c{insert-buffer}
In @c{insert-buffer}, the argument to the @c{interactive} declaration has
two parts, an asterisk, @'{*}, and @'{bInsert buffer: }.
two parts, an asterisk, @'c{*}, and @'c{bInsert buffer: }.
**** A Read-only Buffer
......@@ -3733,14 +3733,14 @@ promoting software freedom.”
asterisk does not need to be followed by a newline to separate it from
the next argument.
**** @'{b} in an Interactive Expression
**** @'c{b} in an Interactive Expression
The next argument in the interactive expression starts with a lower case
@'{b}. (This is different from the code for @c{append-to-buffer}, which
uses an upper-case @'{B}. See Section @l{#The Definition of
@c{append-to-buffer}}.) The lower-case @'{b} tells the Lisp interpreter
@'c{b}. (This is different from the code for @c{append-to-buffer}, which
uses an upper-case @'c{B}. See Section @l{#The Definition of
@c{append-to-buffer}}.) The lower-case @'c{b} tells the Lisp interpreter
that the argument for @c{insert-buffer} should be an existing buffer or
else its name. (The upper-case @'{B} option provides for the
else its name. (The upper-case @'c{B} option provides for the
possibility that the buffer does not exist.) Emacs will prompt you for
the name of the buffer, offering you a default buffer, with name
completion enabled. If the buffer does not exist, you receive a message
......@@ -3814,8 +3814,8 @@ promoting software freedom.”
In the test, the function @c{bufferp} returns true if its argument is a
buffer––but false if its argument is the name of the buffer. (The last
character of the function name @c{bufferp} is the character @'{p}; as we
saw earlier, such use of @'{p} is a convention that indicates that the
character of the function name @c{bufferp} is the character @'c{p}; as we
saw earlier, such use of @'c{p} is a convention that indicates that the
function is a predicate, which is a term that means that the function
will determine whether some property is true or false. See Section
@l{#Using the Wrong Type Object as an Argument}.)
......@@ -3987,12 +3987,12 @@ promoting software freedom.”
It consists of two expressions,
..src > elisp
(push-mark
(save-excursion
(insert-buffer-substring (get-buffer buffer))
(point)))
(push-mark
(save-excursion
(insert-buffer-substring (get-buffer buffer))
(point)))
nil
nil
< src..
......@@ -4042,8 +4042,8 @@ promoting software freedom.”
However, optional arguments are a feature of Lisp: a particular
@:{keyword} is used to tell the Lisp interpreter that an argument is
optional. The keyword is @c{&optional}. (The @'{&} in front of
@'{optional} is part of the keyword.) In a function definition, if an
optional. The keyword is @c{&optional}. (The @'c{&} in front of
@'c{optional} is part of the keyword.) In a function definition, if an
argument follows the keyword @c{&optional}, no value need be passed to
that argument when the function is called.
......
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