Commit e963065f authored by Marcel Amirault's avatar Marcel Amirault 🌴 Committed by Evan Read

Fix capitalization in geo and HA docs

Fix as many backtick and capitalization issues as
possible in Geo and HA docs
parent 9c747a22
......@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ must disable the **primary** node.
NOTE: **Note:**
(**CentOS only**) In CentOS 6 or older, there is no easy way to prevent GitLab from being
started if the machine reboots isn't available (see [gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab#3058]).
started if the machine reboots isn't available (see [Omnibus GitLab issue #3058](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/3058)).
It may be safest to uninstall the GitLab package completely:
```sh
......@@ -317,6 +317,5 @@ section to resolve the error. Otherwise, the secret is lost and you'll need to
[setup-geo]: ../replication/index.md#setup-instructions
[updating-geo]: ../replication/version_specific_updates.md#updating-to-gitlab-105
[sec-tfa]: ../../../security/two_factor_authentication.md#disabling-2fa-for-everyone
[gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab#3058]: https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/3058
[initiate-the-replication-process]: ../replication/database.html#step-3-initiate-the-replication-process
[configure-the-primary-server]: ../replication/database.html#step-1-configure-the-primary-server
......@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ Any change that requires access to the **Admin Area** needs to be done in the
GitLab stores a number of secret values in the `/etc/gitlab/gitlab-secrets.json`
file which *must* be the same on all nodes. Until there is
a means of automatically replicating these between nodes (see issue [gitlab-org/gitlab#3789]),
a means of automatically replicating these between nodes (see [issue #3789](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab/issues/3789)),
they must be manually replicated to the **secondary** node.
1. SSH into the **primary** node, and execute the command below:
......@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ they must be manually replicated to the **secondary** node.
### Step 2. Manually replicate the **primary** node's SSH host keys
GitLab integrates with the system-installed SSH daemon, designating a user
(typically named git) through which all access requests are handled.
(typically named `git`) through which all access requests are handled.
In a [Disaster Recovery] situation, GitLab system
administrators will promote a **secondary** node to the **primary** node. DNS records for the
......@@ -299,7 +299,6 @@ See the [troubleshooting document](troubleshooting.md).
[setup-geo-omnibus]: index.md#using-omnibus-gitlab
[Hashed Storage]: ../../repository_storage_types.md
[Disaster Recovery]: ../disaster_recovery/index.md
[gitlab-org/gitlab#3789]: https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab/issues/3789
[gitlab-com/infrastructure#2821]: https://gitlab.com/gitlab-com/infrastructure/issues/2821
[omnibus-ssl]: https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/ssl.html
[using-geo]: using_a_geo_server.md
......@@ -443,15 +443,15 @@ data before running `pg_basebackup`.
The replication process is now complete.
## PGBouncer support (optional)
## PgBouncer support (optional)
[PGBouncer](http://pgbouncer.github.io/) may be used with GitLab Geo to pool
PostgreSQL connections. We recommend using PGBouncer if you use GitLab in a
[PgBouncer](http://pgbouncer.github.io/) may be used with GitLab Geo to pool
PostgreSQL connections. We recommend using PgBouncer if you use GitLab in a
high-availability configuration with a cluster of nodes supporting a Geo
**primary** node and another cluster of nodes supporting a Geo **secondary** node. For more
information, see [High Availability with GitLab Omnibus](../../high_availability/database.md#high-availability-with-gitlab-omnibus-premium-only).
For a Geo **secondary** node to work properly with PGBouncer in front of the database,
For a Geo **secondary** node to work properly with PgBouncer in front of the database,
it will need a separate read-only user to make [PostgreSQL FDW queries][FDW]
work:
......
......@@ -43,9 +43,9 @@ attachments / avatars and the whole database. This means user accounts,
issues, merge requests, groups, project data, etc., will be available for
query.
## Can I git push to a **secondary** node?
## Can I `git push` to a **secondary** node?
Yes! Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP and SSH, including git-lfs) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
Yes! Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP and SSH, including Git LFS) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
## How long does it take to have a commit replicated to a **secondary** node?
......
......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ described, it is possible to adapt these instructions to your needs.
![Geo HA Diagram](../../high_availability/img/geo-ha-diagram.png)
_[diagram source - gitlab employees only][diagram-source]_
_[diagram source - GitLab employees only][diagram-source]_
The topology above assumes that the **primary** and **secondary** Geo clusters
are located in two separate locations, on their own virtual network
......@@ -274,15 +274,15 @@ After making these changes [Reconfigure GitLab][gitlab-reconfigure] so the chang
On the secondary the following GitLab frontend services will be enabled:
- geo-logcursor
- gitlab-pages
- gitlab-workhorse
- logrotate
- nginx
- registry
- remote-syslog
- sidekiq
- unicorn
- `geo-logcursor`
- `gitlab-pages`
- `gitlab-workhorse`
- `logrotate`
- `nginx`
- `registry`
- `remote-syslog`
- `sidekiq`
- `unicorn`
Verify these services by running `sudo gitlab-ctl status` on the frontend
application servers.
......
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ Keep in mind that:
- Get user data for logins (API).
- Replicate repositories, LFS Objects, and Attachments (HTTPS + JWT).
- Since GitLab Premium 10.0, the **primary** node no longer talks to **secondary** nodes to notify for changes (API).
- Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP and SSH, including git-lfs) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
- Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP and SSH, including Git LFS) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
- There are [limitations](#current-limitations) in the current implementation.
### Architecture
......@@ -240,7 +240,7 @@ This list of limitations only reflects the latest version of GitLab. If you are
- Pushing directly to a **secondary** node redirects (for HTTP) or proxies (for SSH) the request to the **primary** node instead of [handling it directly](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab/issues/1381), except when using Git over HTTP with credentials embedded within the URI. For example, `https://user:[email protected]`.
- The **primary** node has to be online for OAuth login to happen. Existing sessions and Git are not affected.
- The installation takes multiple manual steps that together can take about an hour depending on circumstances. We are working on improving this experience. See [gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab#2978](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/2978) for details.
- The installation takes multiple manual steps that together can take about an hour depending on circumstances. We are working on improving this experience. See [Omnibus GitLab issue #2978](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/2978) for details.
- Real-time updates of issues/merge requests (for example, via long polling) doesn't work on the **secondary** node.
- [Selective synchronization](configuration.md#selective-synchronization) applies only to files and repositories. Other datasets are replicated to the **secondary** node in full, making it inappropriate for use as an access control mechanism.
- Object pools for forked project deduplication work only on the **primary** node, and are duplicated on the **secondary** node.
......
......@@ -49,9 +49,9 @@ questions from [owasp.org](https://www.owasp.org).
### How do the end‐users interact with the application?
- **Secondary** nodes provide all the interfaces a **primary** node does
(notably a HTTP/HTTPS web application, and HTTP/HTTPS or SSH git repository
(notably a HTTP/HTTPS web application, and HTTP/HTTPS or SSH Git repository
access), but is constrained to read-only activities. The principal use case is
envisioned to be cloning git repositories from the **secondary** node in favor of the
envisioned to be cloning Git repositories from the **secondary** node in favor of the
**primary** node, but end-users may use the GitLab web interface to view projects,
issues, merge requests, snippets, etc.
......@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ questions from [owasp.org](https://www.owasp.org).
- A static secret shared across all hosts in a GitLab deployment.
- In transit, data should be encrypted, although the application does permit
communication to proceed unencrypted. The two main transits are the **secondary** node’s
replication process for PostgreSQL, and for git repositories/files. Both should
replication process for PostgreSQL, and for Git repositories/files. Both should
be protected using TLS, with the keys for that managed via Omnibus per existing
configuration for end-user access to GitLab.
......
......@@ -252,7 +252,7 @@ to start again from scratch, there are a few steps that can help you:
gitlab-ctl stop geo-logcursor
```
You can watch sidekiq logs to know when sidekiq jobs processing have finished:
You can watch Sidekiq logs to know when Sidekiq jobs processing have finished:
```sh
gitlab-ctl tail sidekiq
......@@ -280,8 +280,8 @@ to start again from scratch, there are a few steps that can help you:
Any uploaded content like file attachments, avatars or LFS objects are stored in a
subfolder in one of the two paths below:
- /var/opt/gitlab/gitlab-rails/shared
- /var/opt/gitlab/gitlab-rails/uploads
- `/var/opt/gitlab/gitlab-rails/shared`
- `/var/opt/gitlab/gitlab-rails/uploads`
To rename all of them:
......
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
After you set up the [database replication and configure the Geo nodes][req], use your closest GitLab node as you would a normal standalone GitLab instance.
Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP, SSH including git-lfs) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
Pushing directly to a **secondary** node (for both HTTP, SSH including Git LFS) was [introduced](https://about.gitlab.com/2018/09/22/gitlab-11-3-released/) in [GitLab Premium](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/#self-managed) 11.3.
Example of the output you will see when pushing to a **secondary** node:
......
......@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ complexity.
- Sidekiq - Asynchronous/Background jobs
- PostgreSQL - Database
- Consul - Database service discovery and health checks/failover
- PGBouncer - Database pool manager
- PgBouncer - Database pool manager
- Redis - Key/Value store (User sessions, cache, queue for Sidekiq)
- Sentinel - Redis health check/failover manager
- Gitaly - Provides high-level RPC access to Git repositories
......@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ the contention.
- 3 PostgreSQL nodes
- 2 Redis nodes
- 3 Consul/Sentinel nodes
- 2 or more GitLab application nodes (Unicorn, Workhorse, Sidekiq, PGBouncer)
- 2 or more GitLab application nodes (Unicorn, Workhorse, Sidekiq, PgBouncer)
- 1 NFS/Gitaly server
- 1 Monitoring node (Prometheus, Grafana)
......@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ contention due to certain workloads.
#### Reference Architecture
- **Supported Users (approximate):** 10,000
- **Known Issues:** While validating the reference architecture, slow endpoints were discovered and are being investigated. [gitlab-org/gitlab-foss/issues/64335](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab-foss/issues/64335)
- **Known Issues:** While validating the reference architecture, slow endpoints were discovered and are being investigated. [See issue #64335](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab-foss/issues/64335)
The Support and Quality teams built, performance tested, and validated an
environment that supports about 10,000 users. The specifications below are a
......
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ type: reference
As part of its High Availability stack, GitLab Premium includes a bundled version of [Consul](https://www.consul.io/) that can be managed through `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`.
A Consul cluster consists of multiple server agents, as well as client agents that run on other nodes which need to talk to the consul cluster.
A Consul cluster consists of multiple server agents, as well as client agents that run on other nodes which need to talk to the Consul cluster.
## Prerequisites
......@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ Ideally all nodes will have a `Status` of `alive`.
**Note**: This section only applies to server agents. It is safe to restart client agents whenever needed.
If it is necessary to restart the server cluster, it is important to do this in a controlled fashion in order to maintain quorum. If quorum is lost, you will need to follow the consul [outage recovery](#outage-recovery) process to recover the cluster.
If it is necessary to restart the server cluster, it is important to do this in a controlled fashion in order to maintain quorum. If quorum is lost, you will need to follow the Consul [outage recovery](#outage-recovery) process to recover the cluster.
To be safe, we recommend you only restart one server agent at a time to ensure the cluster remains intact.
......@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ To fix this:
1. Run `gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
If you still see the errors, you may have to [erase the consul database and reinitialize](#recreate-from-scratch) on the affected node.
If you still see the errors, you may have to [erase the Consul database and reinitialize](#recreate-from-scratch) on the affected node.
### Consul agents do not start - Multiple private IPs
......@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ If you lost enough server agents in the cluster to break quorum, then the cluste
#### Recreate from scratch
By default, GitLab does not store anything in the consul cluster that cannot be recreated. To erase the consul database and reinitialize
By default, GitLab does not store anything in the Consul cluster that cannot be recreated. To erase the Consul database and reinitialize
```
# gitlab-ctl stop consul
......@@ -174,4 +174,4 @@ After this, the cluster should start back up, and the server agents rejoin. Shor
#### Recover a failed cluster
If you have taken advantage of consul to store other data, and want to restore the failed cluster, please follow the [Consul guide](https://www.consul.io/docs/guides/outage.html) to recover a failed cluster.
If you have taken advantage of Consul to store other data, and want to restore the failed cluster, please follow the [Consul guide](https://www.consul.io/docs/guides/outage.html) to recover a failed cluster.
......@@ -90,8 +90,8 @@ these additional steps before proceeding with GitLab installation.
NOTE: **Note:** When you specify `https` in the `external_url`, as in the example
above, GitLab assumes you have SSL certificates in `/etc/gitlab/ssl/`. If
certificates are not present, Nginx will fail to start. See
[Nginx documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
certificates are not present, NGINX will fail to start. See
[NGINX documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
for more information.
NOTE: **Note:** It is best to set the `uid` and `gid`s prior to the initial reconfigure
......@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ If you enable Monitoring, it must be enabled on **all** GitLab servers.
CAUTION: **Warning:**
After changing `unicorn['listen']` in `gitlab.rb`, and running `sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure`,
it can take an extended period of time for unicorn to complete reloading after receiving a `HUP`.
it can take an extended period of time for Unicorn to complete reloading after receiving a `HUP`.
For more information, see the [issue](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/4401).
## Troubleshooting
......
......@@ -27,10 +27,10 @@ options:
Configure your load balancer(s) to pass connections on port 443 as 'TCP' rather
than 'HTTP(S)' protocol. This will pass the connection to the application nodes
Nginx service untouched. Nginx will have the SSL certificate and listen on port 443.
NGINX service untouched. NGINX will have the SSL certificate and listen on port 443.
See [Nginx HTTPS documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
for details on managing SSL certificates and configuring Nginx.
See [NGINX HTTPS documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
for details on managing SSL certificates and configuring NGINX.
### Load Balancer(s) terminate SSL without backend SSL
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ terminating SSL.
Since communication between the load balancer(s) and GitLab will not be secure,
there is some additional configuration needed. See
[Nginx Proxied SSL documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#supporting-proxied-ssl)
[NGINX Proxied SSL documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#supporting-proxied-ssl)
for details.
### Load Balancer(s) terminate SSL with backend SSL
......@@ -49,12 +49,12 @@ Configure your load balancer(s) to use the 'HTTP(S)' protocol rather than 'TCP'.
The load balancer(s) will be responsible for managing SSL certificates that
end users will see.
Traffic will also be secure between the load balancer(s) and Nginx in this
Traffic will also be secure between the load balancer(s) and NGINX in this
scenario. There is no need to add configuration for proxied SSL since the
connection will be secure all the way. However, configuration will need to be
added to GitLab to configure SSL certificates. See
[Nginx HTTPS documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
for details on managing SSL certificates and configuring Nginx.
[NGINX HTTPS documentation](https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/settings/nginx.html#enable-https)
for details on managing SSL certificates and configuring NGINX.
## Ports
......
......@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ For more details on another person's experience with EFS, see
## Avoid using CephFS and GlusterFS
GitLab strongly recommends against using CephFS and GlusterFS.
These distributed file systems are not well-suited for GitLab's input/output access patterns because git uses many small files and access times and file locking times to propagate will make git activity very slow.
These distributed file systems are not well-suited for GitLab's input/output access patterns because Git uses many small files and access times and file locking times to propagate will make Git activity very slow.
## Avoid using PostgreSQL with NFS
......@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ Note there are several options that you should consider using:
## A single NFS mount
It's recommended to nest all gitlab data dirs within a mount, that allows automatic
It's recommended to nest all GitLab data dirs within a mount, that allows automatic
restore of backups without manually moving existing data.
```
......
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ You may need to update your server's firewall. See the [firewall section](#nfs-i
## Client/ GitLab application node Setup
> Follow the instructions below to connect any GitLab rails application node running
> Follow the instructions below to connect any GitLab Rails application node running
inside your HA environment to the NFS server configured above.
### Step 1 - Install NFS Common on Client
......@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ When using the default Omnibus configuration you will need to share 5 data locat
between all GitLab cluster nodes. No other locations should be shared. Changing the
default file locations in `gitlab.rb` on the client allows you to have one main mount
point and have all the required locations as subdirectories to use the NFS mount for
git-data.
`git-data`.
```text
git_data_dirs({"default" => {"path" => "/nfs/home/var/opt/gitlab-data/git-data"}})
......
......@@ -2,29 +2,29 @@
type: reference
---
# Working with the bundle Pgbouncer service
# Working with the bundle PgBouncer service
As part of its High Availability stack, GitLab Premium includes a bundled version of [Pgbouncer](https://pgbouncer.github.io/) that can be managed through `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`.
As part of its High Availability stack, GitLab Premium includes a bundled version of [PgBouncer](https://pgbouncer.github.io/) that can be managed through `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`.
In a High Availability setup, Pgbouncer is used to seamlessly migrate database connections between servers in a failover scenario.
In a High Availability setup, PgBouncer is used to seamlessly migrate database connections between servers in a failover scenario.
Additionally, it can be used in a non-HA setup to pool connections, speeding up response time while reducing resource usage.
It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on its own dedicated node in a cluster.
It is recommended to run PgBouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on its own dedicated node in a cluster.
## Operations
### Running Pgbouncer as part of an HA GitLab installation
### Running PgBouncer as part of an HA GitLab installation
1. Make sure you collect [`CONSUL_SERVER_NODES`](database.md#consul-information), [`CONSUL_PASSWORD_HASH`](database.md#consul-information), and [`PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH`](database.md#pgbouncer-information) before executing the next step.
1. Edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb` replacing values noted in the `# START user configuration` section:
```ruby
# Disable all components except Pgbouncer and Consul agent
# Disable all components except PgBouncer and Consul agent
roles ['pgbouncer_role']
# Configure Pgbouncer
# Configure PgBouncer
pgbouncer['admin_users'] = %w(pgbouncer gitlab-consul)
# Configure Consul agent
......@@ -59,13 +59,13 @@ It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on i
1. Run `gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
1. Create a `.pgpass` file so Consul is able to
reload pgbouncer. Enter the `PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD` twice when asked:
reload PgBouncer. Enter the `PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD` twice when asked:
```sh
gitlab-ctl write-pgpass --host 127.0.0.1 --database pgbouncer --user pgbouncer --hostuser gitlab-consul
```
#### PGBouncer Checkpoint
#### PgBouncer Checkpoint
1. Ensure the node is talking to the current master:
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on i
(2 rows)
```
### Running Pgbouncer as part of a non-HA GitLab installation
### Running PgBouncer as part of a non-HA GitLab installation
1. Generate PGBOUNCER_USER_PASSWORD_HASH with the command `gitlab-ctl pg-password-md5 pgbouncer`
......@@ -119,7 +119,7 @@ It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on i
**Note:** If the database was already running, it will need to be restarted after reconfigure by running `gitlab-ctl restart postgresql`.
1. On the node you are running pgbouncer on, make sure the following is set in `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`
1. On the node you are running PgBouncer on, make sure the following is set in `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`
```ruby
pgbouncer['enable'] = true
......@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on i
1. Run `gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
1. On the node running unicorn, make sure the following is set in `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`
1. On the node running Unicorn, make sure the following is set in `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`
```ruby
gitlab_rails['db_host'] = 'PGBOUNCER_HOST'
......@@ -144,13 +144,13 @@ It is recommended to run pgbouncer alongside the `gitlab-rails` service, or on i
1. Run `gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
1. At this point, your instance should connect to the database through pgbouncer. If you are having issues, see the [Troubleshooting](#troubleshooting) section
1. At this point, your instance should connect to the database through PgBouncer. If you are having issues, see the [Troubleshooting](#troubleshooting) section
## Enable Monitoring
> [Introduced](https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/omnibus-gitlab/issues/3786) in GitLab 12.0.
If you enable Monitoring, it must be enabled on **all** pgbouncer servers.
If you enable Monitoring, it must be enabled on **all** PgBouncer servers.
1. Create/edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb` and add the following configuration:
......@@ -173,11 +173,11 @@ If you enable Monitoring, it must be enabled on **all** pgbouncer servers.
1. Run `sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure` to compile the configuration.
### Interacting with pgbouncer
### Interacting with PgBouncer
#### Administrative console
As part of omnibus-gitlab, we provide a command `gitlab-ctl pgb-console` to automatically connect to the pgbouncer administrative console. Please see the [pgbouncer documentation](https://pgbouncer.github.io/usage.html#admin-console) for detailed instructions on how to interact with the console.
As part of Omnibus GitLab, we provide a command `gitlab-ctl pgb-console` to automatically connect to the PgBouncer administrative console. Please see the [PgBouncer documentation](https://pgbouncer.github.io/usage.html#admin-console) for detailed instructions on how to interact with the console.
To start a session, run
......@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ ote_pid | tls
## Troubleshooting
In case you are experiencing any issues connecting through pgbouncer, the first place to check is always the logs:
In case you are experiencing any issues connecting through PgBouncer, the first place to check is always the logs:
```shell
# gitlab-ctl tail pgbouncer
......
......@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@ The prerequisites for a HA Redis setup are the following:
1. [Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab][reconfigure] for the changes to take effect.
> Note: You can specify multiple roles like sentinel and redis as:
> Note: You can specify multiple roles like sentinel and Redis as:
> `roles ['redis_sentinel_role', 'redis_master_role']`. Read more about high
> availability roles at <https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/roles/>.
......@@ -446,7 +446,7 @@ The prerequisites for a HA Redis setup are the following:
1. [Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab][reconfigure] for the changes to take effect.
1. Go through the steps again for all the other slave nodes.
> Note: You can specify multiple roles like sentinel and redis as:
> Note: You can specify multiple roles like sentinel and Redis as:
> `roles ['redis_sentinel_role', 'redis_slave_role']`. Read more about high
> availability roles at <https://docs.gitlab.com/omnibus/roles/>.
......@@ -628,7 +628,7 @@ single-machine install, to rotate the **Master** to one of the new nodes.
Make the required changes in configuration and restart the new nodes again.
To disable redis in the single install, edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`:
To disable Redis in the single install, edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`:
```ruby
redis['enable'] = false
......@@ -902,7 +902,7 @@ You can check if everything is correct by connecting to each server using
/opt/gitlab/embedded/bin/redis-cli -h <redis-host-or-ip> -a '<redis-password>' info replication
```
When connected to a `master` redis, you will see the number of connected
When connected to a `master` Redis, you will see the number of connected
`slaves`, and a list of each with connection details:
```
......@@ -948,7 +948,7 @@ to [this issue][gh-531].
You must make sure you are defining the same value in `redis['master_name']`
and `redis['master_pasword']` as you defined for your sentinel node.
The way the redis connector `redis-rb` works with sentinel is a bit
The way the Redis connector `redis-rb` works with sentinel is a bit
non-intuitive. We try to hide the complexity in omnibus, but it still requires
a few extra configs.
......
......@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ to [this upstream issue][gh-531].
You must make sure that `resque.yml` and `sentinel.conf` are configured correctly,
otherwise `redis-rb` will not work properly.
The `master-group-name` ('gitlab-redis') defined in (`sentinel.conf`)
The `master-group-name` (`gitlab-redis`) defined in (`sentinel.conf`)
**must** be used as the hostname in GitLab (`resque.yml`):
```conf
......
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