Commit f1a38494 authored by kollo's avatar kollo

little fixes in english user manual

little fixes in english user manual

little fix in english user manual
parent a5bf2f86
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ the Web server and can be used only on servers that support user
authentication. If an area of the Web site has no access control, the
\verb|AUTH_TYPE| variable has no value associated with it. If an area of the
Web site has access control, the \verb|AUTH_TYPE| variable is set to a specific
value that identifies the authentication scheme being used.
value that identifies the authentication scheme being used. e.g. "Basic".
Using this mechanism, the server can challenge a client's request and the
client can respond. To do this, the server sets a value for the
......@@ -65,9 +65,6 @@ step is to authenticate the user. Using the basic authentication scheme, the
user's browser must supply authentication information that uniquely
identifies the user. This information includes a user ID and password.
Under the current implementation of HTTP, HTTP 1.0, the basic authentication
scheme is the most commonly used authentication method. To specify this method,
set the \verb|AUTH_TYPE| variable as follows: \verb|AUTH_TYPE = Basic|
\item[CONTENT\_LENGTH]
......@@ -221,8 +218,7 @@ extra path information.
\item[QUERY\_STRING]
The \verb|QUERY_STRING| variable specifies an URL-encoded search string. You set
this variable when you use the GET method to submit a fill-out form or
when you use an ISINDEX query to search a document. The query string is
this variable when you use the GET method to submit a fill-out form. The query string is
separated from the URL by a question mark. The user submits all the
information following the question mark separating the URL from the query
string. The following is an example:
......
......@@ -828,8 +828,6 @@ If not freed, the segment resists in memory until the operating system shuts dow
\item The current time or date can be retrieved with
\verb|TIME$| and \verb|DATE$|.
\item The interpreter allows self modifying code.
\item It is possible to link shared library objects and use the functions
provided from within the X11-Basic program
\end{itemize}
......@@ -1051,8 +1049,7 @@ BOX(X=0,Y=0,W=74,H=14, FRAME=2, FRAMECOL=1, TEXTCOL=1, BGCOL=0, PATTERN=0, TEXTM
\section{Menus}
Most applications use a menu bar to allow the user to navigate through program
options. In addition, future versions of X11-Basic will allow pop-up menus and
drop-down list boxes (a special form of a pop-up menu).
options.
Here is a simple example program, which demonstrates the handling of a drop
down menu.
......@@ -1147,19 +1144,17 @@ by the X11-Basic interpreter \verb|xbasic|. This is seen before in shell
scripts, in which the first line tells Unix to execute it with one of the shell
programs. The xbasic executable, which will take this file, parse it, and
execute it, is located in the directory /usr/bin. This may be different on some
systems. If you are not sure where the xbasic executable is, type which xbasic
on the command line, and it will return you the path.
systems. If you are not sure where the xbasic executable is, type \verb|which
xbasic| on the command line, and it will return you the path.
\item {\bf All scripts should be marked as executable by the system.}
Executable files are types that contain instructions for the machine or an
interpreter, such as xbasic, to execute. To mark a file as executable, you need
to alter the file permissions on the script file. There are three basic
permissions: read, write, and execute. There are also three levels of access:
owner, group, and anyone. X11-Basic files should have their permissions changed so
that you, the owner, has permission to read, write and execute your file, while
others only have permission to read and execute your file. This is done with
the following command:
to alter the file permissions on the script file. X11-Basic files should have
their permissions changed so that you, the owner, has permission to read, write
and execute your file, while others only have permission to read and execute
your file. This is done with the following command:
\begin{mdframed}[hidealllines=true,backgroundcolor=black!20]
......
......@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ tedinfo$=MKL$(VARPTR(te_ptext$))+MKL$(VARPTR(te_ptmplt$))+
MKI$(te_thickness)+MKI$(te_txtlen)+MKI$(te_tmplen)
\end{verbatim}}
The three character pointer point to text strings required for
The three character pointers point to text strings required for
\verb|G_FTEXT|
and \verb|G_FBOXTEXT| objects. te\_ptext points to the actual text to be
displayed and is the only field used by all text objects. te\_ptmplt
......
......@@ -552,8 +552,7 @@ string is a collection of bytes of certain length. You can treat strings as
arbitrary length of binary data if you need. Strings are automatically
elastic, meaning they automatically resize to contain whatever number of bytes
are put into them. When a string resizes, its location in memory may change, as
when a longer string is assigned and there is insufficient
room after the string
when a longer string is assigned and there is insufficient room after the string
to store the extra bytes.
String variables are distinguished by the \$ suffix.
......@@ -1773,8 +1772,6 @@ FOR i%=1 TO 10 STEP 2
\end{verbatim}
\end{mdframed}
That will increment i\% in steps of 2 until it reaches 10.
\item X11-Basic will
check for correct loop termination while entering the code into the editor.
\item You can terminate the FOR-NEXT-loop with the \verb|EXIT IF| statement.
\end{enumerate}
......
......@@ -329,9 +329,14 @@ QUIT
\subsection{Using the WINDOWS Version of X11-Basic}
You should have installed the package \verb|X11-Basic-1.25-1-win.zip| by
extracting all files and invoking the setup program (\verb|setup.exe|). This
installs X11-Basic into a folder \verb|C:\\x11basic|. All files you need for
The installation is done in the usual way with a setup program, e.g.
\verb|X11-Basic-1.25-47-setup.exe|, which you can download from the homepage.
All files will be installed on the program folder on `C:`.
In the case you have got a .zip file, e.g. \verb|X11-Basic-1.25-1-win.zip|,
you should extract all files and invoking the setup program (\verb|setup.exe|).
This installs X11-Basic into a folder \verb|C:\\x11basic|.
All files you need for
using X11-Basic are located there:
\begin{verbatim}
......
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