Commit 039e2bb7 authored by Jan Görig's avatar Jan Görig

Manual pages fixes

Taken from Debian with small changes added

Authors: Craig Small <csmall@debian.org>, Brendan O'Dea <bod@debian.org>
parent 887c1b95
.\" -*-Nroff-*-
.\" This page Copyright (C) 1993 Matt Welsh, mdw@sunsite.unc.edu.
.\" Freely distributable under the terms of the GPL
.TH FREE 1 "20 Mar 1993 " "Cohesive Systems" "Linux User's Manual"
.TH FREE 1 "5 Oct 2009 " "Cohesive Systems" "Linux User's Manual"
.SH NAME
free \- Display amount of free and used memory in the system
.SH SYNOPSIS
.BR "free " [ "\-b" " | " "\-k" " | " "\-m" "] [" "\-o" "] [" "\-s"
.I delay
.RB "] [" "\-t" "] [" "\-V" ]
.B free
.RB [ \-b | \-k | \-m | \-g ]
.RB [ \-c
.IR count ]
.RB [ \-l ]
.RB [ \-o ]
.RB [ \-t ]
.RB [ \-s
.IR delay ]
.RB [ \-V ]
.SH DESCRIPTION
\fBfree\fP displays the total amount of free and used physical and swap
memory in the system, as well as the buffers used by the kernel.
The shared memory column should be ignored; it is obsolete.
.SS Options
The \fB-b\fP switch displays the amount of memory in bytes; the
\fB-k\fP switch (set by default) displays it in kilobytes; the \fB-m\fP
switch displays it in megabytes.
.PP
The \fB-t\fP switch displays a line containing the totals.
.PP
The \fB-o\fP switch disables the display of a "buffer adjusted" line.
If the -o option is not specified, \fBfree\fP subtracts buffer memory
from the used memory and adds it to the free memory reported.
.PP
The \fB-s\fP switch activates continuous polling \fIdelay\fP seconds apart. You
.SS OPTIONS
.TP
\fB\-b\fR
Display the amount of memory in bytes.
.TP
\fB\-c\fR \fIcount\fR
Display the result \fIcount\fR times. Requires the \fB\-s\fR option.
.TP
\fB\-g\fR
Display the amount of memory in gigabytes.
.TP
\fB\-k\fR
Display the amount of memory in kilobytes. This is the default.
.TP
\fB\-l\fR
Show detailed low and high memory statistics.
.TP
\fB\-m\fR
Display the amount of memory in megabytes.
.TP
\fB\-o\fR
Display the output in old format, the only difference being this option
will disable the display of the "buffer adjusted" line.
.TP
\fB\-s\fR
Continuously display the result \fIdelay\fP seconds apart. You
may actually specify any floating point number for \fIdelay\fP,
.BR usleep (3)
is used for microsecond resolution delay times.
.PP
The \fB\-V\fP displays version information.
.TP
\fB\-t\fR
Display a line showing the column totals.
.TP
\fB\-V\fR
Display version information.
.SH FILES
.ta
.IR /proc/meminfo "\-\- memory information"
.nf
/proc/meminfo memory information
.fi
.SH "SEE ALSO"
.BR ps (1),
.BR slabtop (1),
.BR vmstat (8),
.BR top(1)
.SH AUTHORS
Written by Brian Edmonds.
Send bug reports to <albert@users.sf.net>
.SH "SEE ALSO"
.BR ps "(1), " slabtop "(1), " top "(1), " vmstat (8).
.\"{{{}}}
......@@ -10,23 +10,18 @@
kill \- send a signal to a process
.SH SYNOPSIS
.TS
l l.
kill pid ... Send SIGTERM to every process listed.
kill -signal pid ... Send a signal to every process listed.
kill -s signal pid ... Send a signal to every process listed.
kill -l List all signal names.
kill -L List all signal names in a nice table.
kill -l signal Convert a signal number into a name.
kill -V,--version Show version of program
.TE
\fBkill\fR [ \-\fBsignal\fR | \-s \fBsignal\fR ] \fBpid\fR ...
.br
\fBkill\fR [ \-L | -V, \-\-version ]
.br
\fBkill\fR \-l [ \fBsignal\fR ]
.SH DESCRIPTION
The default signal for kill is TERM. Use -l or -L to list available signals.
The default signal for kill is TERM. Use \-l or \-L to list available signals.
Particularly useful signals include HUP, INT, KILL, STOP, CONT, and 0.
Alternate signals may be specified in three ways: -9 -SIGKILL -KILL.
Alternate signals may be specified in three ways: \-9 \-SIGKILL \-KILL.
Negative PID values may be used to choose whole process groups; see the
PGID column in ps command output. A PID of -1 is special; it indicates
PGID column in ps command output. A PID of \-1 is special; it indicates
all processes except the kill process itself and init.
.SH SIGNALS
......@@ -37,12 +32,11 @@ When known constant, numbers and default behavior are shown.
lB rB lB lB
lfCW r l l.
Name Num Action Description
.TH
0 0 n/a exit code indicates if a signal may be sent
ALRM 14 exit
HUP 1 exit
INT 2 exit
KILL 9 exit this signal may not be blocked
KILL 9 exit cannot be blocked
PIPE 13 exit
POLL exit
PROF exit
......@@ -50,15 +44,15 @@ TERM 15 exit
USR1 exit
USR2 exit
VTALRM exit
STKFLT exit may not be implemented
PWR ignore may exit on some systems
STKFLT exit might not be implemented
PWR ignore might exit on some systems
WINCH ignore
CHLD ignore
URG ignore
TSTP stop may interact with the shell
TTIN stop may interact with the shell
TTOU stop may interact with the shell
STOP stop this signal may not be blocked
TSTP stop might interact with the shell
TTIN stop might interact with the shell
TTOU stop might interact with the shell
STOP stop cannot be blocked
CONT restart continue if stopped, otherwise ignore
ABRT 6 core
FPE 8 core
......@@ -66,11 +60,11 @@ ILL 4 core
QUIT 3 core
SEGV 11 core
TRAP 5 core
SYS core may not be implemented
EMT core may not be implemented
BUS core core dump may fail
XCPU core core dump may fail
XFSZ core core dump may fail
SYS core might not be implemented
EMT core might not be implemented
BUS core core dump might fail
XCPU core core dump might fail
XFSZ core core dump might fail
.TE
.SH NOTES
......@@ -79,36 +73,30 @@ You may need to run the command described here as /bin/kill to solve
the conflict.
.SH EXAMPLES
.SS
.B "kill -9 -1"
.nf
.TP
.B kill \-9 \-1
Kill all processes you can kill.
.fi
.PP
.SS
.B "kill -l 11"
.nf
.TP
.B kill \-l 11
Translate number 11 into a signal name.
.fi
.PP
.SS
.B "kill -L"
.nf
.TP
.B kill -L
List the available signal choices in a nice table.
.fi
.PP
.SS
.B "kill 123 543 2341 3453"
.nf
.TP
.B kill 123 543 2341 3453
Send the default signal, SIGTERM, to all those processes.
.fi
.PP
.SH "SEE ALSO"
pkill(1) skill(1) kill(2) renice(1) nice(1) signal(7) killall(1)
.BR pkill (1),
.BR skill (1),
.BR kill (2),
.BR renice (1),
.BR nice (1),
.BR signal (7),
.BR killall (1).
.SH STANDARDS
This command meets appropriate standards. The -L flag is Linux-specific.
This command meets appropriate standards. The \-L flag is Linux-specific.
.SH AUTHOR
Albert Cahalan <albert@users.sf.net> wrote kill in 1999 to replace a
......
......@@ -2,35 +2,39 @@
.\" Licensed under version 2 of the GNU General Public License.
.\" Copyright 2000 Kjetil Torgrim Homme
.\"
.TH PGREP 1 "June 25, 2000" "Linux" "Linux User's Manual"
.TH PGREP 1 "October 5, 2007" "Linux" "Linux User's Manual"
.SH NAME
pgrep, pkill \- look up or signal processes based on name and other attributes
.SH SYNOPSIS
pgrep [\-flvx] [\-d \fIdelimiter\fP] [\-n|\-o] [\-P \fIppid\fP,...] [\-g \fIpgrp\fP,...]
.br
[\-s \fIsid\fP,...] [\-u \fIeuid\fP,...] [\-U \fIuid\fP,...] [\-G \fIgid\fP,...]
.br
[\-t \fIterm\fP,...] [\fIpattern\fP]
pkill [\-\fIsignal\fP] [\-fvx] [\-n|\-o] [\-P \fIppid\fP,...] [\-g \fIpgrp\fP,...]
.br
[\-s \fIsid\fP,...] [\-u \fIeuid\fP,...] [\-U \fIuid\fP,...] [\-G \fIgid\fP,...]
.br
[\-t \fIterm\fP,...] [\fIpattern\fP]
.na
\fBpgrep\fR [\fB\-flvx\fR] [\fB\-d\ \fIdelimiter\fR] [\fB\-n\fR|\fB\-o\fR] \
[\fB\-P\ \fIppid\fR,...] [\fB\-g\ \fIpgrp\fR,...] [\fB\-s\ \fIsid\fR,...] \
[\fB\-u\ \fIeuid\fR,...] [\fB\-U\ \fIuid\fR,...] [\fB\-G\ \fIgid\fR,...] \
[\fB\-t\ \fIterm\fR,...] [\fIpattern\fR]
.HP
\fBpkill\fR [\fB\-\fIsignal\fR] [\fB\-fvx\fR] [\fB\-n\fR|\fB\-o\fR] \
[\fB\-P\ \fIppid\fR,...] [\fB\-g\ \fIpgrp\fR,...] [\fB\-s\ \fIsid\fR,...] \
[\fB\-u\ \fIeuid\fR,...] [\fB\-U\ \fIuid\fR,...] [\fB\-G\ \fIgid\fR,...] \
[\fB\-t\ \fIterm\fR,...] [\fIpattern\fR]
.SH DESCRIPTION
\fBpgrep\fP looks through the currently running processes and lists the
process IDs which matches the selection criteria to stdout. All
the criteria have to match. For example,
pgrep -u root sshd
.IP
$ pgrep \-u root sshd
.PP
will only list the processes called \fBsshd\fP AND owned by \fBroot\fP.
On the other hand,
pgrep -u root,daemon
.IP
$ pgrep \-u root,daemon
.PP
will list the processes owned by \fBroot\fP OR \fBdaemon\fP.
\fBpkill\fP will send the specified signal (by default \fBSIGTERM\fP)
......@@ -38,15 +42,15 @@ to each process instead of listing them on stdout.
.SH OPTIONS
.TP
\-d \fIdelimiter\fP
\fB\-d \fIdelimiter\fP
Sets the string used to delimit each process ID in the output (by
default a newline). (\fBpgrep\fP only.)
.TP
\-f
\fB\-f\fR
The \fIpattern\fP is normally only matched against the process name.
When \-f is set, the full command line is used.
When \fB\-f\fR is set, the full command line is used.
.TP
\-g \fIpgrp\fP,...
\fB\-g \fIpgrp\fP,...
Only match processes in the process group IDs listed. Process group 0
is translated into \fBpgrep\fP's or \fBpkill\fP's own process group.
.TP
......@@ -54,40 +58,40 @@ is translated into \fBpgrep\fP's or \fBpkill\fP's own process group.
Only match processes whose real group ID is listed. Either the
numerical or symbolical value may be used.
.TP
\-l
\fB\-l\fR
List the process name as well as the process ID. (\fBpgrep\fP only.)
.TP
\-n
\fB\-n\fR
Select only the newest (most recently started) of the matching
processes.
.TP
\-o
\fB\-o\fR
Select only the oldest (least recently started) of the matching
processes.
.TP
\-P \fIppid\fP,...
\fB\-P \fIppid\fP,...
Only match processes whose parent process ID is listed.
.TP
\-s \fIsid\fP,...
\fB\-s \fIsid\fP,...
Only match processes whose process session ID is listed. Session ID 0
is translated into \fBpgrep\fP's or \fBpkill\fP's own session ID.
.TP
\-t \fIterm\fP,...
\fB\-t \fIterm\fP,...
Only match processes whose controlling terminal is listed. The
terminal name should be specified without the "/dev/" prefix.
.TP
\-u \fIeuid\fP,...
\fB\-u \fIeuid\fP,...
Only match processes whose effective user ID is listed. Either the
numerical or symbolical value may be used.
.TP
\-U \fIuid\fP,...
\fB\-U \fIuid\fP,...
Only match processes whose real user ID is listed. Either the
numerical or symbolical value may be used.
.TP
\-v
\fB\-v\fR
Negates the matching.
.TP
\-x
\fB\-x\fR
Only match processes whose name (or command line if \-f is specified)
\fBexactly\fP match the \fIpattern\fP.
.TP
......@@ -104,32 +108,40 @@ process names or command lines.
.SH EXAMPLES
Example 1: Find the process ID of the \fBnamed\fP daemon:
unix$ pgrep \-u root named
.IP
$ pgrep \-u root named
.PP
Example 2: Make \fBsyslog\fP reread its configuration file:
unix$ pkill \-HUP syslogd
.IP
$ pkill \-HUP syslogd
.PP
Example 3: Give detailed information on all \fBxterm\fP processes:
unix$ ps \-fp $(pgrep \-d, \-x xterm)
.IP
$ ps \-fp $(pgrep \-d, \-x xterm)
.PP
Example 4: Make all \fBnetscape\fP processes run nicer:
unix$ renice +4 `pgrep netscape`
.IP
$ renice +4 `pgrep netscape`
.SH "EXIT STATUS"
.PD 0
.TP
.I "0"
.I 0
One or more processes matched the criteria.
.TP
.I "1"
.I 1
No processes matched.
.TP
.I "2"
.I 2
Syntax error in the command line.
.TP
.I "3"
.I 3
Fatal error: out of memory etc.
.SH NOTES
......@@ -141,13 +153,19 @@ The running \fBpgrep\fP or \fBpkill\fP process will never report
itself as a match.
.SH BUGS
The options \-n and \-o and \-v can not be combined. Let me know if
you need to do this.
The options \fB\-n\fP and \fB\-o\fP and \fB\-v\fP can not be combined.
Let me know if you need to do this.
Defunct processes are reported.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
ps(1) regex(7) signal(7) killall(1) skill(1) kill(1) kill(2)
.BR ps (1),
.BR regex (7),
.BR signal (7),
.BR killall (1),
.BR skill (1),
.BR kill (1),
.BR kill (2)
.SH STANDARDS
\fBpkill\fP and \fBpgrep\fP were introduced in Sun's Solaris 7. This
......
......@@ -10,25 +10,29 @@
pmap \- report memory map of a process
.SH SYNOPSIS
.nf
pmap [ -x | -d ] [ -q ] pids...
pmap -V
.fi
.B pmap
.RB [ \-x | \-d ]
.RB [ \-q ]
.I pid
\& ...
.br
.B pmap \-V
.SH DESCRIPTION
The pmap command reports the memory map of a process or processes.
.SH "GENERAL OPTIONS"
.TS
l l l.
-x extended Show the extended format.
-d device Show the device format.
-q quiet Do not display some header/footer lines.
-V show version Displays version of program.
lB l l.
\-x extended Show the extended format.
\-d device Show the device format.
\-q quiet Do not display some header/footer lines.
\-V show version Displays version of program.
.TE
.SH "SEE ALSO"
ps(1) pgrep(1)
.BR ps (1),
.BR pgrep (1)
.SH STANDARDS
No standards apply, but pmap looks an awful lot like a SunOS command.
......
......@@ -11,37 +11,38 @@
skill, snice \- send a signal or report process status
.SH SYNOPSIS
.nf
skill [signal to send] [options] process selection criteria
snice [new priority] [options] process selection criteria
.fi
.B skill
.RI [ "signal to send" ]
.RI [ options ]
.I process selection criteria
.br
.B snice
.RI [ "new priority" ]
.RI [ options ]
.I process selection criteria
.SH DESCRIPTION
These tools are probably obsolete and unportable. The command
syntax is poorly defined. Consider using the killall, pkill,
and pgrep commands instead.
The default signal for skill is TERM. Use -l or -L to list available signals.
The default signal for skill is TERM. Use \-l or \-L to list available signals.
Particularly useful signals include HUP, INT, KILL, STOP, CONT, and 0.
Alternate signals may be specified in three ways: -9 -SIGKILL -KILL.
Alternate signals may be specified in three ways: \-9 \-SIGKILL \-KILL.
The default priority for snice is +4. (snice +4 ...)
Priority numbers range from +20 (slowest) to -20 (fastest).
Priority numbers range from +20 (slowest) to \-20 (fastest).
Negative priority numbers are restricted to administrative users.
.SH "GENERAL OPTIONS"
.TS
l l l.
-f fast mode This is not currently useful.
-i interactive use T{
You will be asked to approve each action.
T}
-v verbose output T{
Display information about selected processes.
T}
-w warnings enabled This is not currently useful.
-n no action This only displays the process ID.
-V show version Displays version of program.
lB l l.
\-f fast mode This is not currently useful.
\-i interactive use You will be asked to approve each action.
\-v verbose output Display information about selected processes.
\-w warnings enabled This is not currently useful.
\-n no action This only displays the process ID.
\-V show version Displays version of program.
.TE
.SH "PROCESS SELECTION OPTIONS"
......@@ -49,11 +50,11 @@ Selection criteria can be: terminal, user, pid, command.
The options below may be used to ensure correct interpretation.
Do not blame Albert for this interesting interface.
.TS
l l.
-t The next argument is a terminal (tty or pty).
-u The next argument is a username.
-p The next argument is a process ID number.
-c The next argument is a command name.
lB l.
\-t The next argument is a terminal (tty or pty).
\-u The next argument is a username.
\-p The next argument is a process ID number.
\-c The next argument is a command name.
.TE
.SH SIGNALS
......@@ -63,7 +64,6 @@ When known, numbers and default behavior are shown.
lB rB lB lB
lfCW r l l.
Name Num Action Description
.TH
0 0 n/a exit code indicates if a signal may be sent
ALRM 14 exit
HUP 1 exit
......@@ -104,15 +104,20 @@ XFSZ core core dump may fail
lB lB
lfCW l.
Command Description
.TC
snice seti crack +7 Slow down seti and crack
skill -KILL -v /dev/pts/* Kill users on new-style PTY devices
skill -STOP viro lm davem Stop 3 users
snice -17 root bash Give priority to root's shell
skill \-KILL \-v /dev/pts/* Kill users on new-style PTY devices
skill \-STOP viro lm davem Stop 3 users
snice \-17 root bash Give priority to root's shell
.TE
.SH "SEE ALSO"
killall(1) pkill(1) kill(1) renice(1) nice(1) signal(7) kill(2)
.BR killall (1),
.BR pkill (1),
.BR kill (1),
.BR renice (1),
.BR nice (1),
.BR kill (2),
.BR signal (7)
.SH STANDARDS
No standards apply.
......
......@@ -7,36 +7,39 @@
slabtop \- display kernel slab cache information in real time
.SH SYNOPSIS
.BI "slabtop [ " options " ] "
.B slabtop
.RI [ options ]
.SH DESCRIPTION
.BR slabtop (1)
.B slabtop
displays detailed kernel slab cache information in real time. It displays a
listing of the top caches sorted by one of the listed sort criteria. It also
displays a statistics header filled with slab layer information.
.SH OPTIONS
Normal invocation of
.BR slabtop (1)
.B slabtop
does not require any options. The behavior, however, can be fine-tuned by
specifying one or more of the following flags:
.TP
.B \-\^\-delay=n, \-d n
Refresh the display every n seconds. By default,
.BR slabtop (1)
.B \-\-delay=\fIn\fR, \fB\-d \fIn
Refresh the display every
.I n
in seconds. By default,
.B slabtop
refreshes the display every three seconds. To exit the program, hit
.BR q.
.TP
.B \-\^\-sort=S, \-s S
Sort by S, where S is one of the sort criteria.
.B \-\-sort=\fIS\fR, \fB\-s\fR \fIS
Sort by \fIS\fR, where \fIS\fR is one of the sort criteria.
.TP
.B \-\^\-once, \-o
.B \-\-once\fR, \fB\-o
Display the output once and then exit.
.TP
.B \-\^\-version, \-V
.B \-\-version\fR, \fB\-V
Display version information and exit.
.TP
.B \-\^\-help
.B \-\-help
Display usage information and exit.
.SH SORT CRITERIA
......@@ -78,7 +81,7 @@ sort by object size
sort by cache utilization
.SH COMMANDS
.BR slabtop (1)
.B slabtop
accepts keyboard commands from the user during use. The following are
supported. In the case of letters, both cases are accepted.
......@@ -94,7 +97,9 @@ Refresh the screen.
Quit the program.
.SH FILES
.IR /proc/slabinfo " \-\- slab information"
.TP
.I /proc/slabinfo
slab information
.SH "SEE ALSO"
.BR free (1),
......@@ -104,7 +109,7 @@ Quit the program.
.SH NOTES
Currently,
.BR slabtop (1)
.B slabtop
requires a 2.4 or later kernel (specifically, a version 1.1 or later
.IR /proc/slabinfo ).
Kernel 2.2 should be supported in the future.
......@@ -116,7 +121,7 @@ file is tracking information about used slab physical memory.
.SH AUTHORS
Written by Chris Rivera and Robert Love.
.BR slabtop (1)
.B slabtop
was inspired by Martin Bligh's perl script,
.BR vmtop .
The procps package is maintained by Albert Cahalan <albert@users.sf.net>.
......
......@@ -10,76 +10,108 @@
.SH NAME
sysctl \- configure kernel parameters at runtime
.SH SYNOPSIS
.B "sysctl [-n] [-e] variable ..."
.B sysctl
.RB [ \-n ]
.RB [ \-e ]
.I variable
\&...
.br
.B "sysctl [-n] [-e] [-q] -w variable=value ..."
.B sysctl
.RB [ \-n ]
.RB [ \-e ]
.RB [ \-q ]
.B \-w
.IR variable = value
\&...
.br
.B "sysctl [-n] [-e] [-q] -p <filename>"
.B sysctl
.RB [ \-n ]
.RB [ \-e ]
.RB [ \-q ]
.B \-p
.RI [ filename ]
.br
.B "sysctl [-n] [-e] -a"
.B sysctl
.RB [ \-n ]
.RB [ \-e ]
.B \-a
.br
.B "sysctl [-n] [-e] -A"
.B sysctl
.RB [ \-n ]
.RB [ \-e ]
.B \-A
.SH DESCRIPTION
.B sysctl
is used to modify kernel parameters at runtime. The parameters available
are those listed under /proc/sys/. Procfs is required for
.B sysctl(8)
.B sysctl
support in Linux. You can use
.B sysctl(8)
.B sysctl
to both read and write sysctl data.
.SH PARAMETERS
.TP
.B "variable"
.I variable
The name of a key to read from. An example is kernel.ostype. The '/'
separator is also accepted in place of a '.'.
.TP
.B "variable=value"
To set a key, use the form variable=value, where variable is the key and
value is the value to set it to. If the value contains quotes or characters
.IR variable = value
To set a key, use the form
.IR variable = value
where
.I variable
is the key and
.I value
is the value to set it to. If the value contains quotes or characters
which are parsed by the shell, you may need to enclose the value in double
quotes. This requires the -w parameter to use.
quotes. This requires the
.B \-w
parameter to use.
.TP
.B "-n"
.B \-n
Use this option to disable printing of the key name when printing values.
.TP
.B "-e"
.B \-e
Use this option to ignore errors about unknown keys.
.TP
.B "-N"
.B \-N
Use this option to only print the names. It may be useful with shells that
have programmable completion.
.TP
.B "-q"
.B \-q
Use this option to not display the values set to stdout.
.TP
.B "-w"
.B \-w
Use this option when you want to change a sysctl setting.
.TP
.B "-p"
.B \-p
Load in sysctl settings from the file specified or /etc/sysctl.conf if none given.
Specifying \- as filename means reading data from standard input.
.TP
.B "-a"
.B \-a
Display all values currently available.
.TP
.B "-A"
.B \-A
Display all values currently available in table form.
.SH EXAMPLES
.TP
/sbin/sysctl -a
.TP
/sbin/sysctl -n kernel.hostname
.TP
/sbin/sysctl -w kernel.domainname="example.com"
.TP
/sbin/sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.conf
/sbin/sysctl \-a
.br
/sbin/sysctl \-n kernel.hostname
.br
/sbin/sysctl \-w kernel.domainname="example.com"
.br
/sbin/sysctl \-p /etc/sysctl.conf
.SH FILES
.I /proc/sys
.br
.I /etc/sysctl.conf
.SH SEE ALSO
.BR sysctl.conf (5)
.SH BUGS
The -A parameter behaves just as -a does.
The
.B \-A
parameter behaves just as
.B \-a
does.
.SH AUTHOR
George Staikos, <staikos@0wned.org>
......@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ The
.BI "\-d" " delay"
option sets the time argument for an
.BR alarm (2);
if -d 0 is specified, the alarm is set to 0, which will never send the
if \-d 0 is specified, the alarm is set to 0, which will never send the
.B SIGALRM
and update the display.
......