Commit e9eb9858 authored by Thomas Dennis's avatar Thomas Dennis

Fill in some missing sections on the kana page.

parent 8588f50f
......@@ -234,7 +234,7 @@
<table>
<tr><th>Katakana</th><th>Romaji</th><th>Translation</th></tr>
<tr><td>チーズ</td><td>chiizu</td><td>Cheese</td></tr>
<tr><td>パーセント </td><td>paasento</td><td>Percent</td></tr>
<tr><td>パーセント</td><td>paasento</td><td>Percent</td></tr>
<tr><td>パーク</td><td>paaku</td><td>Park</td></tr>
</table>
<p>
......@@ -254,13 +254,13 @@
speakers would call "R" or "L", so it's not true (in the strictest sense) to
say that "R and L are the same letter in Japanese" - it's more like "neither R
nor L exist in Japanese, but らりるれろ and ラリルレロ are pretty close approximations
for the sound of either one".
for the sound of either one".
</p>
<h3>F- sounds</h3>
<p class="warning-box">TODO: Add more detail to this section...</p>
<p>
The basic "fu" (ふ or フ) sound can be modified by a small vowel character:
There are no explicit characters for fa/fi/fe/fo. Instead, the basic "fu" (ふ
or フ) sound is modified by adding a small vowel character as shown below:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Romaji</th><th>Katakana</th></tr>
......@@ -270,22 +270,41 @@ The basic "fu" (ふ or フ) sound can be modified by a small vowel character:
<tr><td>fo</td><td>フォ</td></tr>
</table>
<p>
Examples: Family Mart
Thus, "loanwords" (i.e words of foreign origin) can be approximated like so:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Katakana</th><th>Romaji</th><th>Translation</th></tr>
<tr><td>ファッション</td><td>fasshon</td><td>Fashion</td></tr>
<tr><td>フィンランド</td><td>finrando</td><td>Finland</td></tr>
<tr><td>フェンシング</td><td>fenshingu</td><td>Fencing</td></tr>
<tr><td>フォーク</td><td>fooku</td><td>Fork</td></tr>
</table>
<h3>V- sounds</h3>
<p class="warning-box">TODO: Add more detail to this section...</p>
<p>
Usually replaced with B.
The letter "v" is generally replaced with "b" in Japanese loanwords:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Katakana</th><th>Romaji</th><th>Translation</th></tr>
<tr><td>バレンタイン</td><td>barentain</td><td>Valentine</td></tr>
<tr><td>ボーカリスト</td><td>bookarisuto</td><td>Vocalist</td></tr>
</table>
<p>
Alternatively, can be written as a "voiced" katakana U (ヴ), with a small vowel following it, similar to fa/fi/fu/fo
hiragana counterpart ゔ exists but isn't actually used for anything.
However, in some cases "v" may be represented as a "voiced" katakana "u" (ヴ),
with a small vowel following it as per fa/fi/fu/fo:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Katakana</th><th>Romaji</th><th>Translation</th></tr>
<tr><td>ヴァレンタイン</td><td>varentain</td><td>Valentine</td></tr>
<tr><td>ヴォーカリスト</td><td>vookarisuto</td><td>Vocalist</td></tr>
</table>
<p>
There is a hiragana counterpart (ゔ), but it's essentially useless since there
aren't any native Japanese words that require it.
</p>
<p>
Katakana characters for va/vi/ve/vo were defined, but never actually used. They
are represented as "voiced" versions of the wa/wi/we/wo katakana characters.
<b>Trivia:</b> Katakana characters for va/vi/ve/vo do exist, but aren't used.
They look like "voiced" versions of the wa/wi/we/wo characters:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Romaji</th><th>Katakana</th><th>Unused</th></tr>
......@@ -295,34 +314,35 @@ are represented as "voiced" versions of the wa/wi/we/wo katakana characters.
<tr><td>vo</td><td>ヴォ</td><td class="kana-special"></td></tr>
</table>
<p>
Examples: Vocalist
These are <i>really</i> obscure (browsers probably won't display them without
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Unifont">Unifont</a> installed), so
don't be surprised if you never see them mentioned anywhere except this page.
</p>
<h3>Th- sounds</h3>
<p class="warning-box">TODO: Add more detail to this section...</p>
<p>
Usually replaced with S or Z.
</p>
<p>
Gareth = Garesu
</p>
<p>
The = Za
As with "v" above, a "th" sound doesn't exist in Japanese. Instead, loanwords
usually replace "th" with either "s" or "z" to approximate the sound:
</p>
<table>
<tr><th>Katakana</th><th>Romaji</th><th>Translation</th></tr>
<tr><td>ガレス</td><td>garesu</td><td>Gareth</td></tr>
<tr><td></td><td>za</td><td>The</td></tr>
</table>
<h3>W- sounds</h3>
<p>
The "wa" kana (わ/ワ) are pretty much the only real "w" characters in Japanese.
The "wo" kana (を/ヲ) are actually pronounced more like "o", and are rather less
common than the usual お/オ kana.
The "wa" kana (わ/ワ) are pretty much the only real "w" characters in Japanese.
The "wo" kana (を/ヲ) are actually pronounced more like "o", and are rather less
common than the usual お/オ kana.
</p>
<p>
The "wi" (ゐ/ヰ) and "we" (ゑ/ヱ) kana are obsolete and are almost never used. If
they <em>are</em> used, it's generally for "effect" rather than pronunciation;
they sound identical to "i" (い/イ) and "e" (え/エ) in modern Japanese. For example,
<a href="http://www.evangelion.co.jp/3_0" target="_blank">ヱヴァンゲリヲン</a> would be
transliterated as "Evangelion", not "Wevangelion" (also, notice that ヲ is used
instead of オ for the "o" sound - as with ゑ, the "w" isn't actually pronounced).
The "wi" (ゐ/ヰ) and "we" (ゑ/ヱ) kana are obsolete and are almost never used. If
they <em>are</em> used, it's generally for "effect" rather than pronunciation;
they sound identical to "i" (い/イ) and "e" (え/エ) in modern Japanese. For example,
<a href="http://www.evangelion.co.jp/3_0" target="_blank">ヱヴァンゲリヲン</a> would be
transliterated as "Evangelion", not "Wevangelion" (also, notice that ヲ is used
instead of オ for the "o" sound - as with ゑ, the "w" isn't actually pronounced).
</p>
<p>
Instead, w- sounds (other than "wa") tend to be represented as a "u" followed
......
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