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SSH access and repository management app for GitLab

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GitLab Shell

GitLab Shell handles git commands for GitLab

GitLab Shell handles git commands for GitLab and modifies the list of authorized keys. GitLab Shell is not a Unix shell nor a replacement for Bash or Zsh.

When you access the GitLab server over ssh then GitLab Shell will:

  1. Limits you to predefined git commands (git push, git pull, git annex).
  2. Call the GitLab Rails API to check if you are authorized
  3. It will execute the pre-receive hooks (called Git Hooks in GitLab Enterprise Edition)
  4. It will excute the action you requested
  5. Process the GitLab post-receive actions
  6. Process any custom post-receive actions

If you access a GitLab server over http(s) what happens depends on if you pull from or push to the git repository. If you pull from git repositories over http(s) the GitLab Rails app will completely handle the authentication and execution. If you push to git repositories over http(s) the GitLab Rails app will not handle any authentication or execution but it will delegate the following to GitLab Shell:

  1. Call the GitLab Rails API to check if you are authorized
  2. It will execute the pre-receive hooks (called Git Hooks in GitLab Enterprise Edition)
  3. It will excute the action you requested
  4. Process the GitLab post-receive actions
  5. Process any custom post-receive actions

Maybe you wonder why in the case of git push over http(s) the Rails app doesn't handle authentication before delegating to GitLab Shell. This is because GitLab Rails doesn't have the logic to interpret git push commands. The idea is to have these interpretation code in only one place and this is GitLab Shell so we can reuse it for ssh access. Actually GitLab Shell executes all git push commands without checking authorizations and relies on the pre-receive hooks to check authorizations. When you do a git pull command the authorizations are checked before executing the commands (either in GitLab Rails or GitLab Shell with an API call to GitLab Rails). The authorization checks for git pull are much simpler since you only have to check if a user can access the repo (no need to check branch permissions).

An overview of the four cases described above:

  1. git pull over ssh -> gitlab-shell -> API call to gitlab-rails (Authorization) -> accept or decline -> execute git command
  2. git pull over http -> gitlab-rails (AUthorization) -> accept or decline -> execute git command
  3. git push over ssh -> gitlab-shell (git command is not executed yet) -> execute git command -> gitlab-shell pre-receive hook -> API call to gitlab-rails (authorization) -> accept or decline push
  4. git push over http -> gitlab-rails (git command is not executed yet) -> execute git command -> gitlab-shell pre-receive hook -> API call to gitlab-rails (authorization) -> accept or decline push

Code status

CI Build Status Code Climate Coverage Status

Requirements

GitLab shell will always use your system ruby (normally located at /usr/bin/ruby) and will not use the ruby your installed with a ruby version manager (such as RVM). It requires ruby 2.0 or higher. Please uninstall any old ruby versions from your system:

sudo apt-get remove ruby1.8

Download Ruby and compile it with:

mkdir /tmp/ruby && cd /tmp/ruby
curl -L --progress http://cache.ruby-lang.org/pub/ruby/2.1/ruby-2.1.5.tar.gz | tar xz
cd ruby-2.1.5
./configure --disable-install-rdoc
make
sudo make install

Setup

./bin/install

Check

./bin/check

Repos

Add repo:

./bin/gitlab-projects add-project gitlab/gitlab-ci.git

Remove repo:

./bin/gitlab-projects rm-project gitlab/gitlab-ci.git

List repos:

./bin/gitlab-projects list-projects

Import repo:

# Default timeout is 2 minutes
./bin/gitlab-projects import-project randx/six.git https://github.com/randx/six.git

# Override timeout in seconds
./bin/gitlab-projects import-project randx/six.git https://github.com/randx/six.git 90

Fork repo:

./bin/gitlab-projects fork-project gitlab/gitlab-ci.git randx

Update HEAD:

./bin/gitlab-projects update-head gitlab/gitlab-ci.git 3-2-stable

Create branch:

./bin/gitlab-projects create-branch gitlab/gitlab-ci.git 3-2-stable master

Remove branch:

./bin/gitlab-projects rm-branch gitlab/gitlab-ci.git 3-0-stable

Create tag (lightweight & annotated):

./bin/gitlab-projects create-tag gitlab/gitlab-ci.git v3.0.0 3-0-stable
./bin/gitlab-projects create-tag gitlab/gitlab-ci.git v3.0.0 3-0-stable 'annotated message goes here'

Remove tag:

./bin/gitlab-projects rm-tag gitlab/gitlab-ci.git v3.0.0

Keys

Add key:

./bin/gitlab-keys add-key key-782 "ssh-rsa AAAAx321..."

Remove key:

./bin/gitlab-keys rm-key key-23 "ssh-rsa AAAAx321..."

List all keys:

./bin/gitlab-keys list-keys

Remove all keys from authorized_keys file:

./bin/gitlab-keys clear

Git LFS remark

If you want to play with git-lfs (https://git-lfs.github.com/) on GitLab, you should do the following:

  • Install LFS-server (no production-ready implementation yet, but you can use https://github.com/github/lfs-test-server) on any host;
  • Add some user on LFS-server (for example: user foo with password bar);
  • Add git-lfs-authenticate script in any PATH-available directory on GIT-server like this: #!/bin/sh echo "{ \"href\": \"http://lfs.test.local:9999/test/test\", \"header\": { \"Authorization\": \"Basic `echo -n foo:bar | base64`\" } }"

After that you can play with git-lfs (git-lfs feature will be available via ssh protocol).

This design will work without a script git-lfs-authenticate, but with the following limitations:

  • You will need to manually configure lfs-server URL for every user working copy;
  • SSO don't work and you need to manually add lfs-server credentials for every user working copy (otherwise, git-lfs will ask for the password for each file).

Usefull links: