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Commits (2)
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If you have to remind someone of the position you have in the company, you're doing something wrong. People already know [our decision-making process](https://about.gitlab.com/handbook/leadership/#making-decisions). Explain why you're making the decision, and respect everyone irrespective of their function.
##### Assume positive intent
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We naturally have a double standard when it comes to the actions of others. We blame circumstances for our own mistakes, but individuals for theirs. This double standard is called the [Fundamental Attribution Error](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_attribution_error). In order to mitigate this bias you should always [assume positive intent](https://www.collaborativeway.com/general/a-ceos-advice-assume-positive-intent/) in your interactions with others, respecting their expertise and giving them grace in the face of what you might perceive as mistakes.
##### Address behavior, but don't label people
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There is a lot of good in [this article](http://bobsutton.typepad.com/my_weblog/2006/10/the_no_asshole_.html) about not wanting jerks on our team, but we believe that **jerk** is a label for behavior rather than an inherent classification of a person. We avoid classifications.
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