Commit 3b4ce0aa authored by Emma Jane's avatar Emma Jane Committed by Git for Teams

Lesson 4: Adding new lesson on configuring Git

parent e5ccc2f6
# Configuring Git
Over time, you will find little shortcuts that help you use Git at
the command line. Personally I've found those who are the most
frustrated with it, are the ones with the least amount of
customization. You don't *need* do to any of the things I've setup
in this lesson, but you might find them a little helpful. As this
setup will be hugely dependent on how you are working at the command
line, I'm not going to spend a lot of time in the *video* showing
you how to get this setup. There are some resources in the
repository that you've already downloaded (look for the "sample"
files in the directory `resources`).
## Customize Your Command Prompt
If you're working from the command line, you get ZERO clues
about what's going on with your files, until you explicitly ask
Git about them. This is tedious to keep having to ask. It's
like when you were 8 and sat in the back of the car whining at
the driver saying, "are we almost there yet?"
Instead of having to explicitly ask, I've modified my command line
prompt to tell me which branch I currently have checked out and
whether or not I've made changes to any of the files in my
repository. This is a fairly common hack, but every developer
will have their own little quirks on how they implement it.
Searching the web for `bash prompt git status` will yield lots
of results. My own prompt is fairly simple, but others have
added a lot more details to their prompt. For example: [Show your git status and branch (in color) at the command prompt](https://coderwall.com/p/pn8f0g) or [local
file status](https://github.com/magicmonty/bash-git-prompt). As
with all things technical: the more you add initially, the more
you'll need to debug if it doesn't work right away.
I found the fancy prompts to actually be quite fussy to set up,
and ended up giving up on the really detailed ones. I recommend
you too start with something really simple and then add to it if
you *really* need more information. The simple change in
colour, along with the name of the branch, actually suits me
just fine and is less distracting without all the extra
information.
### Lesson Objectives
### Self-Check
### Summary
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment