Commit 6a48a98f authored by Matthias Andree's avatar Matthias Andree

Revise for grammar, spelling, and clarity. Courtesy of Robert Mullin.

svn path=/branches/BRANCH_6-3/; revision=5460
parent 8b0814aa
......@@ -59,6 +59,10 @@ fetchmail 6.3.14 (not yet released):
improving overall robustness of the IMAP client), bug report and testing by
Matt Doran, with further hints from Timo Sirainen.
# DOCUMENTATION
* The README.SSL document was revised for grammar, spelling, and clarity.
Courtesy of Robert Mullin.
# TRANSLATION UPDATES
* [it] Italian, by Vincenzo Campanella
......
......@@ -8,8 +8,8 @@ Note: there is a separate document "README.SSL-SERVER" describing the server-
side requirements for proper SSL support. It has checklist-style and is not
specific to fetchmail.
In case of troubles, mail that other document to your ISP and have them check
their server configuration against it.
In case of troubles, mail the README.SSL-SERVER file to your ISP and
have them check their server configuration against it.
Unfortunately, fetchmail confuses SSL/TLS protocol levels with whether
a service needs to use in-band negotiation (STLS/STARTTLS for POP3/IMAP4) or is
......@@ -23,17 +23,25 @@ Quickstart
----------
For use of SSL or TLS with in-band negotiation on the regular service's port,
i. e. with STLS or STARTTLS, use these command line options (in the rcfile,
omit the leading "--"):
i. e. with STLS or STARTTLS, use these command line options
--sslproto tls1 --sslcertck
or these options in the rcfile (after the respective "user"... options)
sslproto tls1 sslcertck
For use of SSL or TLS on a separate port, if the whole TCP connection is
SSL-encrypted from the very beginning, use these command line options (in the
rcfile, omit the leading "--"):
rcfile, omit all leading "--"):
--ssl --sslproto ssl3 --sslcertck
or these options in the rcfile (after the respective "user"... options)
ssl sslproto ssl3 sslcertck
Background and use (long version :-))
------------------
......@@ -42,7 +50,7 @@ Using fetchmail's "ssl" option, you can have the data transferred between you
and the server in an encrypted form, so that eavesdropping should become
practically impossible.
This works as following: the server has a key pair (a secret and a public key),
This works as follows: the server has a key pair (a secret and a public key),
and it sends the client its public key. Messages encrypted with the public key
can be decrypted using the private one and vice versa.
......@@ -60,8 +68,8 @@ authentication information if you do not use a challenge based authentication
mechanism (because it is thought to be the real server, fetchmail will try to
authenticate against it by telling it your password).
So, not only you need to prove your identity to the server, the server likewise
needs to prove (authenticate) its identity to you.
So, not only do you need to prove your identity to the server, the
server likewise needs to prove (authenticate) its identity to you.
In the standard setting, the server has a certificate (the client can have
a certificate too to prove its identity, but this is not covered by this
document). This certificate contains the server's public key, some data about
......@@ -69,7 +77,7 @@ the server, and a digital signature and data about the signer.
Digital signatures can also be made using a key pair as described earlier.
To check this certificate, you should use the new option "sslcertck". When it
is specified, the signature of server certificate is checked against local
is specified, the signature of the server certificate is checked against local
trusted certificates to see whether the owner of one of the certificates has
signed that server certificate, and if so, whether the signature is valid.
So, if the server certificate is signed by a Certification Authority (CA),
......@@ -107,10 +115,11 @@ the public key that is used by the server. The fingerprint is a hash of that
key that (hopefully) has few collisions and is hard to attack using a "birthday
attack", i.e. nobody can generate a second key that hashes to the same value of
the original key in reasonable time. So, if the fingerprint matches, you can be
reasonable sure that you talk to the original server, because only that knows
the secret key, and it is very hard to generate a matching secret key from the
public key. If it does not, it might be an attack, but keep in mind that the
server key may also have changed legitimately before panicking ;)
reasonably sure that you are talking to the original server, because
only that server knows the secret key, and it is very hard to generate a
matching secret key from the public key. If the fingerprint does not
match, there might be an attack, but, before panicking, keep in mind
that the server key may also have changed legitimately.
Fetchmail will present the fingerprint to you in verbose mode. You can have
fetchmail check the fingerprint (using the "sslfingerprint" option, and giving
......@@ -118,9 +127,9 @@ the desired fingerprint as an argument).
The fingerprints fetchmail uses are MD5 sums. You can generate them e.g. using
openssl(1)'s "x509 -fingerprint" command. The format is a hexadecimal string
with a ":" separating two byes (i.e. a ":" every two hex "digits"). The
match is case insensitive since release 6.3.10 (upper-case digits A to F
were required up to and including release 6.3.9).
with a ":" separating two bytes (i.e. a ":" between every two hex "digits"). The
match is case insensitive since release 6.3.10 (upper-case digits A to F were
required up to and including release 6.3.9).
*CAVEAT*: OpenSSL must be at least version 0.9.7 to be able to check CRLs.
......
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