Commit b2d4c99e authored by Nico Josuttis's avatar Nico Josuttis

add feature to auto send encrypted and update sending preferences dialog

  Squashed commit of the following:
    commit 947842f9
    Date:   Thu May 8 18:36:14 2014 +0200
      final fixes before merging AutoSendEncrypted branch into the master
    commit 87dc3175
    Date:   Tue May 6 23:12:53 2014 +0200
      finishing first version of auto-send-encrypted and other sending stuff
    commit 17e0d58d
      persist encryption model
    commit 8dd0f8d2
    Date:   Mon May 5 23:41:56 2014 +0200
      try out convenient/manual settings for sending preferences
    commit 7fbae3e5
    Date:   Fri May 2 09:22:06 2014 +0200
      try to find valid keys inside enigmail
    commit 744fb1d3
      simplified accepted keys stuff
    commit 0d18ac6e
      option to accept only poersonal keys
    commit 91d1db2f
    Date:   Tue Apr 29 07:41:46 2014 +0200
      try different options for accepted keys
    commit 2cda0978
      reduced options and icons update while editing recipients
    commit 5da3971d
    Date:   Sun Apr 20 19:52:22 2014 +0200
      pre-commit hook to detect unexpanded tabs in changes
    commit aa9d2f65
      more conditions for confirmation before sending the final email
       replaces confirmBeforeSend by confirmBeforeSending
       migration from confirmBeforeSend to confirmBeforeSending MISSING
    commit 31916750
    Date:   Sun Apr 20 13:05:58 2014 +0200
      add feature AutoSendEncrypted (basic implementation)
parent 24fc50a9
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
......@@ -61,8 +61,8 @@
<!ENTITY enigmail.moreOptions.label "Weitere Einstellungen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.encryptToSelf.label "Zusätzlich mit eigenem Schlüssel verschlüsseln">
<!ENTITY enigmail.encryptToSelf.tooltip "Auch Sie selbst können die Nachrichten wieder entschlüsseln und lesen.">
<!ENTITY enigmail.alwaysTrustSend.label "Schlüsseln immer vertrauen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.alwaysTrustSend.tooltip "Das &quot;Web of Trust&quot; nicht verwenden, um die Gültigkeit der Schlüssel zu bestimmen.">
<!ENTITY enigmail.alwaysTrustSend.label "Gültigen Schlüsseln immer vertrauen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.alwaysTrustSend.tooltip "Das &quot;Web of Trust&quot; nicht verwenden, um die Gültigkeit der Schlüssel zu bestimmen (außer für abgelaufene/widerrufene Schlüssel).">
<!ENTITY enigmail.useNonDefaultComment.label "Enigmail-Information zur OpenPGP-Signatur hinzufügen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.keyserver.label "Schlüsselserver">
<!ENTITY enigmail.keyserverDlg.label "Schlüsselserver auswählen">
......@@ -161,6 +161,34 @@
<!ENTITY enigmail.defaultSignPlainMsg.label "Unverschlüsselte Nachrichten standardmäßig unterschreiben">
<!ENTITY enigmail.defaultEncryptionNone.label "Keine automatische Verschlüsselung">
<!ENTITY enigmail.defaultNotSignedsend.label "Nachrichten nicht unterschreiben">
<!ENTITY enigmail.encryptionModelConvenient.label "Bequeme Verschluesselungs-Einstellungen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.encryptionModelManually.label "Manuelle Verschluesselungs-Einstellungen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.acceptedKeysOption.label "Zum verschluesselten Senden akzeptiere">
<!ENTITY enigmail.acceptedKeysValid.label "nur Schluessel, denen ich trauen kann">
<!ENTITY enigmail.acceptedKeysValid.tooltip "This option is provided to deal with the danger of faked keys using the Web-of-Trust. You only accept keys that are signed by yourself or by other people you trust. Technically, you only accept keys 'valid' for encryption.">
<!ENTITY enigmail.acceptedKeysAll.label "alle Schluessel (sofern nicht abgelaufen, zurueckgezogen oder deaktiviert)">
<!ENTITY enigmail.acceptedKeysAll.tooltip "This option allows encryption whenever you have a key that is neither disabled by you nor revoked/expired by the owner. Because these keys are not necessarily validated/signed, there is a risk that you use faked keys, so that others than the requested recipients can read the content of the encrypted email. However, that's still better than sending emails unencrypted. Technically, this uses the GPG option '--trust-model always'.">
<!ENTITY enigmail.autoSendEncryptedOption.label "Sende automatisch verschluesselt">
<!ENTITY enigmail.autoSendEncryptedNever.label "nie">
<!ENTITY enigmail.autoSendEncryptedNever.tooltip "Don't automatically send encrypted except explicitly triggered by per-recipient rules">
<!ENTITY enigmail.autoSendEncryptedIfKeys.label "wenn moeglich">
<!ENTITY enigmail.autoSendEncryptedIfKeys.tooltip "Automatically send encrypted when for each recipient at least one keys is known and accepted (see above) and no recipient rule forces not to encrypt.">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingOption.label "Senden bestätigen">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingNever.label "nie">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingNever.tooltip "Dont't display information dialog about signing/encryption before sending a message">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingAlways.label "immer">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingAlways.tooltip "Always display information dialog about signing/encryption before sending a message">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfEncrypted.label "falls verschluesselt">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfEncrypted.tooltip "Display information dialog about signing/encryption before sending an ENCRYPTED message">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfNotEncrypted.label "falls nicht verschluesselt">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfNotEncrypted.tooltip "Display information dialog about signing/encryption before sending an UNENCRYPTED message">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfRules.label "wenn Regeln die Standard-Einstellung zum Verschluesseln geaendert haben">
<!ENTITY enigmail.confirmBeforeSendingIfRules.tooltip "Display information dialog about signing/encryption before sending, if your preference regarding encryption was changed by a per-recipient rule or auto encryption">
<!ENTITY enigmail.recipientsSelectionOption.label "Wahl der Schlüssel von Nachrichten-Empfängern">
<!ENTITY enigmail.perRecipientRules.label "Durch Empfängerregeln">
<!ENTITY enigmail.perRecipientRules.tooltip "Sie werden bei Bedarf aufgefordert eine neue Empfängerregel zu erstellen.">
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>OpenPGP Hilfe</h1>
<h3>Optionen zum Verschlüsselten Senden</h3>
<p>In den Senden Einstellungen can man prinzipiell das Modell und die prinzipiellen Einstellungen zum Verschlüsseln einstellen. </p>
<dl>
<dt>Bequeme Verschlüsselung</dt>
<dd>Mit diesen Einstellungen wird möglichst immer ohne Rückfragen verschlüsselt.
<p>Diese Einstellungen sind vor allem dann angemessen, wenn man einfach nur seine Privatsphäre erhöhen will, indem man Emails möglichst verschlüsselt statt unverschlüsselt verschickt.
<p>Der Effekt ist wie wenn man Emails statt als Postkarten als Briefe versendet. Im Gegensatz zu Postkarten kann damit unterwges nicht mehr jder den Inhalt der Email einfach so mitlesen.
<p>Wie bei Briefen bietet das aber keine absolute Garantie, dass die Emails unterwegs nicht von anderen gelesen werden können (auch wenn dazu ein gewisser technischer Aufwand notwendig ist).
<p>Ein ganz konkretes Risiko besteht darin, aus Versehen &quot;gefälschte Schlüssel&quot; zu verwenden, die man von irgendjemanden oder irgendwo bekommen hat und nur behauptet wurde, dass der Schlüssel zur angegebenen Email-Adresse gehört. Um dieses Risiko zu vermeiden, sollte man nur Schlüssel akzeptieren, denen man vetrauen kann (siehe unten), oder immer selbst einen Schlüssel anhand des Fingerabdrucks mit dem Eigentümer abgleichen (und unterschreiben).</dd>
<dt>Manuelle Verschlüsselung</dt>
<dd>Mit dieser Option kann man die verschiedenen Einstellungen zur Verschlüsselung nach den eignenen Vorstellungen anpassen. Man kann festlegen
<ul>
<li>ob auf verschlüsselte/signierte Emails automatisch verschlüsselt/signiert geantwortet werden soll.</li>
<li>ob man nur Schlüssel akzeptieren will, denen man auch vertrauen kann (dies aktiviert das OpenPGP Vertrauensmodell, durch das man nur Schlüsseln vertraut, die von einem selbst oder Personen, denen man trauen kann, unterschrieben wurden).</li>
<li>ob man möglichst immer automatisch verschlüsseln will.</li>
<li>ob und unter welchen Umständen eine ausgehende Email (und deren Verschlüsselung) final bestätigt werden muss.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
Falls es wichtig ist, dass der Inhalt von verschlüsselten Emails nicht von anderen Personen oder Organisationen gelesen werden können, sollte man zumindest bei den manuellen Einstellungen die Option einschalten, mit der nur vertrauenswürdige Schlüssel akzeptiert werden. Während dies das Risiko der Verwendung von &quot;gefälschten Schlüsseln&quot; reduziert, muss man dazu aber in der Schlüsselverwaltung Schlüssel aktiv unterschreiben und/oder aktiv bestätigen, welchen Email-Adressen (Personen/Organizationen) man trauen kann, wenn diese die Gültigkeit von Schlüssel bestätigen.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Enigmail Help: Edit OpenPGP Rule</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<style type="text/css">
/*<![CDATA[*/
dt { font-weight: bold; }
/*]]>*/
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Enigmail Help</h1>
<h3>Defining Preferences to Send Encrypted</h3>
<p>In the Sending Preferences you can choose the general model and preferences for encryption.</p>
<dl>
<dt>Convenient Encryption</dt>
<dd>With these settings, emails are encrypted without confirmation whenever possible.
<p>This setup is appropriate, if you just want to improve your privacy by sending emails encyrpted instead of unencrypted if that's possible.
<p>The effect is like sending emails as letters instead of postcards. Unlike postcards, letters usually hide their contents while in transit.
<p>Note however that as with letters you can't be sure that nobody is opening the letter while it is in transit (although, some technical effort is necessary for that).
<p>A concrete risk is that you accidentally use &quot;faked keys&quot; you got from somewhere or somebody claiming that the key belongs to the person you want to send emails to. To avoid this risk, you can either use the trust model of PGP (see below) or you should always verify, whether the fingerprint of a public key is correct.</dd>
<dt>Manual Encryption</dt>
<dd>This option allows you to specify the different preferences for encryption according to your needs. You can specify
<ul>
<li>whether replies to encrypted/signed emails should automatically also be encrypted/signed-</li>
<li>whether to use the trust model of OpenPGP to accept keys (this means that to use a key you either have to sign the key or have enough other people you trust having signed the key).</li>
<li>whether you want to automatically send emails encrypted if all keys are accepted.</li>
<li>whether and when you want to finally confirm sending an email.</li>
</ul>
</dd>
If it is important for you that content you send encrypted can't be read by other people or organizations, you should use the manual preferences at least choose the option to accept keys only if you or other people signed them. While this model reduces the risk of using faked keys, it requires that you actively sign keys and declare owner trust using the key managament dialog.
</body>
</html>