Commit 8fc7f280 authored by Daniel Shumway's avatar Daniel Shumway

Merge branch 'develop' into 'master'

develop

See merge request !24
parents ec4039ae 847d1efe
Pipeline #22779119 passed with stages
in 1 minute and 14 seconds
......@@ -379,10 +379,10 @@ had some teeth.
<h1 id="the-ux"><a class="anchor" href="#the-ux">The UX</a></h1>
<p>
Even if autoplay blocking worked as intended, the UX would still be problematic.
Google has been developing a nasty habit recently of removing user controls from
a large portion of the software and hardware they release. With autoplay,
there<span class="quote single-close">'</span>s no option or button you can click to whitelist or blacklist a domain;
everything is instead algorithmically determined.
Google has a nasty habit of removing user controls from a large portion of the
software and hardware they release. With autoplay, there<span class="quote single-close">'</span>s no option or button
you can click to whitelist or blacklist a domain; everything is instead
algorithmically determined.
</p>
<p>
......@@ -449,15 +449,15 @@ href="https://twitter.com/mcclure111/status/994426324616966146?ref_src=twsrc%5Et
10, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async
src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
<p>
In fact, many of the developers who have complained to Google (myself included)
In fact many of the developers who have complained to Google (myself included)
would actually like to see a much stricter policy than what Chrome already
shipped. We<span class="quote single-close">'</span>ve argued that a 50% block rate on unintended audio simply is not
shipped. We<span class="quote single-close">'</span>ve argued that a 50% block rate on unintended audio simply isn<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t
good enough.
</p>
<p>
Even if there were no developer issues at all it would be worth taking the
policy back to the drawing board.
In light of these problems, even if there were no developer issues at all, it
would still be worth taking the policy back to the drawing board.
</p>
</section>
......@@ -465,16 +465,16 @@ policy back to the drawing board.
<section class="the-developers">
<h1 id="the-developers"><a class="anchor" href="#the-developers">The Developers</a></h1>
<p>
Unfortunately, there are developer issues. Chrome<span class="quote single-close">'</span>s autoplay policy somehow
Unfortunately there are developer issues. Chrome<span class="quote single-close">'</span>s autoplay policy somehow
manages to strike a balance of being both lax for advertisers and irritating for
normal developers at the same time.
</p>
<p>
Performing a user gesture doesn<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t automatically resume audio; so background
sounds and music simply won<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t play when using the Web Audio API. To get around
this issue developers need to put apps and videos behind some kind of splash
screen.
Performing a user gesture doesn<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t automatically resume audio, which means that
background sounds and music simply won<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t play when using the Web Audio API. To
get around this issue developers need to put apps and videos behind some kind of
splash screen.
</p>
<p>
......@@ -487,9 +487,9 @@ simple toys.
<p>
Audio-based notifications are worth calling out specifically. When a user opens
up a new tab on Slack or Facebook, they expect that tab to be able to play audio
to alert them to new messages. Instead, the new tab will be obliquely muted with
no indication to the user that they need to interact with the page before it
will be allowed to play sound.
and alert them of new messages. Instead the new tab will be obliquely muted with
no indication to the user. Users may not realize they need to interact with the
page before their notifications will start working.
</p>
<aside>
......@@ -515,10 +515,10 @@ Google puts into trying to get developers to do so.
<p>
Legacy content and distributed content make up a huge portion of the web: apps
have been broken that are not maintained or that are archived and hosted by
third parties who don<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t understand the inner workings of the code. Many games
have been bundled and shipped through distribution channels that developers no
longer have access to.
that are either unmaintained or that are archived and hosted by third parties who
don<span class="quote single-close">'</span>t understand the inner workings of the code. Many games have been bundled
and shipped through distribution channels that developers no longer have
access to.
</p>
<p>
......
......@@ -130,10 +130,10 @@ had some teeth.
== The UX
Even if autoplay blocking worked as intended, the UX would still be problematic.
Google has been developing a nasty habit recently of removing user controls from
a large portion of the software and hardware they release. With autoplay,
there's no option or button you can click to whitelist or blacklist a domain;
everything is instead algorithmically determined.
Google has a nasty habit of removing user controls from a large portion of the
software and hardware they release. With autoplay, there's no option or button
you can click to whitelist or blacklist a domain; everything is instead
algorithmically determined.
It's kind of obviously bad UX -- predictable behavior and explicit affordances
are the basic building blocks of any decent user interface. But Chrome's design
......@@ -185,24 +185,24 @@ href="https://twitter.com/mcclure111/status/994426324616966146?ref_src=twsrc%5Et
src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
++++
In fact, many of the developers who have complained to Google (myself included)
In fact many of the developers who have complained to Google (myself included)
would actually like to see a much stricter policy than what Chrome already
shipped. We've argued that a 50% block rate on unintended audio simply is not
shipped. We've argued that a 50% block rate on unintended audio simply isn't
good enough.
Even if there were no developer issues at all it would be worth taking the
policy back to the drawing board.
In light of these problems, even if there were no developer issues at all, it
would still be worth taking the policy back to the drawing board.
== The Developers
Unfortunately, there are developer issues. Chrome's autoplay policy somehow
Unfortunately there are developer issues. Chrome's autoplay policy somehow
manages to strike a balance of being both lax for advertisers and irritating for
normal developers at the same time.
Performing a user gesture doesn't automatically resume audio; so background
sounds and music simply won't play when using the Web Audio API. To get around
this issue developers need to put apps and videos behind some kind of splash
screen.
Performing a user gesture doesn't automatically resume audio, which means that
background sounds and music simply won't play when using the Web Audio API. To
get around this issue developers need to put apps and videos behind some kind of
splash screen.
This can work for many app genres, but not for all of them. Throwing additional
barriers in front of users can often cheapen an end product. This can make
......@@ -211,9 +211,9 @@ simple toys.
Audio-based notifications are worth calling out specifically. When a user opens
up a new tab on Slack or Facebook, they expect that tab to be able to play audio
to alert them to new messages. Instead, the new tab will be obliquely muted with
no indication to the user that they need to interact with the page before it
will be allowed to play sound.
and alert them of new messages. Instead the new tab will be obliquely muted with
no indication to the user. Users may not realize they need to interact with the
page before their notifications will start working.
[aside]
--
......@@ -231,10 +231,10 @@ app, a large amount of content simply won't be updated -- no matter what effort
Google puts into trying to get developers to do so.
Legacy content and distributed content make up a huge portion of the web: apps
have been broken that are not maintained or that are archived and hosted by
third parties who don't understand the inner workings of the code. Many games
have been bundled and shipped through distribution channels that developers no
longer have access to.
that are either unmaintained or that are archived and hosted by third parties who
don't understand the inner workings of the code. Many games have been bundled
and shipped through distribution channels that developers no longer have
access to.
It is irresponsible for anyone, especially Google, to claim that developers can
simply update their apps. The web doesn't work that way.
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment