Commit 811f848a authored by Sam Muirhead's avatar Sam Muirhead

change folder structure, update equipment list

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In this folder you'll find printable PDFs in A4 (landscape) and A3 (portrait) format, as well as the editable SVGs should you wish to make any changes. It uses the [Futura Renner](https://fontlibrary.org/en/font/futura-renner) typeface.
![Commit Log](Commit-Log.png)
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- **inkpad**(s) for rubber stamps
- an **expanding file** to function as a repository.
- a **paper cutter**, or **utility knife** and **cutting board** for trimming the zines
- 3 tables: a **Work table**, a **Commit Table**, and a **Remix Table**
- 3 tables: a **Create table**, a **Commit Table**, and a **Remix Table**
![](Images/README-Images/triangle-layout.png)
## Specialised/harder-to-find equipment:
- a **Commit Log** printed on either A3 or A4 sheets - adapt/print the files from the [Commit Log](Commit-Log) folder.
- **Instructional posters** - these can be referred to by participants to clarify steps in the process, or explain, for example, why open source licenses are necessary. Adapt and print using files from the [Posters](Posters) folder.
- **Creative Commons rubber stamps** - these need to be custom made, but it's not expensive, should only take a few days to arrive, and you can use the design files in the [CC Rubber Stamps](CC-Rubber-Stamps) folder.
- **'The Committer'**, an [automatic page-numbering stamp](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bates_numbering). The only requirement is that it needs to have a setting for duplicate numbering, i.e. it will print the same number **twice** before incrementing to the next number. I bought a used [Reiner B6](http://www.reiner.de/index.php?B6_Handstempel_Numerieren_mit_und_ohne_Text_en), which cost €20 on eBay.
- **Letter stamps** for making the authors' names. These are not _strictly_ necessary, of course the participants could write their names with a pen. But name stamps do make the names very legible, which is important for attribution, and it can be a nice metaphor for github/gitlab handles, the unique online identity which refers to a person... and people love to make their own name stamps. I ordered 20× alphabet sets from a seller on [AliExpress](https://www.aliexpress.com/item/English-Alphabet-Capital-Letter-Rubber-Stamp-Free-Combination-DIY-Seal-Pattern-Stamps/32717795321.html), though I adjusted the numbers of letters that I brought to the workshop according to [letter frequency](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_frequency) in major European languages - in a London-based workshop, there isn't much use for all 20× _Z_s, _Q_s or _X_s, though there may be in other areas/cultures.
- **Photocopier** or **multi-function printer** (MFP). This can be a small desktop printer/copier, as it doesn't need to do complex or high-speed printing, and only needs to produce black & white A4. However, I would recommend trying to borrow one, as hiring a copier can be expensive. In London it cost £180 to hire an A4 MFP for two days (including delivery), which was the cheapest quote I could find.
- **Instructional posters** - these can be referred to by participants to clarify steps in the process, or explain, for example, why open source licenses are necessary. Adapt and print using files from the [Instructional Posters](Print/Instructional-Posters) folder.
- **Creative Commons rubber stamps** - these need to be custom made, but it's not expensive, should only take a few days to arrive, and you can use the design files in the [CC Rubber Stamps](CC-Rubber-Stamps) folder. It is possible for participants to simply write in the license name with a pen, but one of the symbolic aspects that the stamps help communicate is that CC licenses are well-understood and functional **standards** which should not be 'customised' with personal clauses and additions. Only using stamps also prevents copyright nerds from overcomplicating things by writing in _WTFPL_ and _AGPL version 1_...
- **'The Committer'**, an [automatic page-numbering stamp](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bates_numbering). The only requirement is that it needs to have a setting for duplicate numbering, i.e. it will print the same number **twice** before incrementing to the next number. I bought a used [Reiner B6](http://www.reiner.de/index.php?B6_Handstempel_Numerieren_mit_und_ohne_Text_en), which cost €20 on eBay. If you can't get your hands on one of these, it _is_ possible for participants to write their own commit numbers by hand, but it can make legibility a little more difficult, and it's not nearly as much fun as using the big stamp! I also like the 'automated' aspect of using the Committer because it's more like digital version control - ```git``` will automatically assign a unique commit number to your commit, you don't need to write one in yourself.
- **Photocopier** or **multi-function printer** (MFP). This can be a small desktop printer/copier, as it doesn't need to do complex or high-speed printing, and only needs to produce black & white A4. The speed of the copier does become an issue if you have a lot of participants (>15). I would recommend trying to borrow a copier, as hiring a copier can be very expensive. In London it cost £180 to hire an A4 MFP for two days (including delivery), which was the cheapest quote I could find.
- **Typewriter** - you can buy one from second-hand shops or markets, or depending on your location, you may be able to hire one. For Mozilla Festival, I hired an East German _Erika_ from [London Typewriters](http://www.londontypewriters.co.uk/). (For this typewriter, the hire price was £40, or it was £105 to buy).
## Optional:
- **Letter stamps** for making the authors' names. These are not _strictly_ necessary, of course the participants could write their names with a pen. But name stamps do make the names very legible, which is important for attribution, and it can be a nice metaphor for github/gitlab handles, the unique online identity which refers to a person... and people love to make their own name stamps. I ordered 20× alphabet sets from a seller on [AliExpress](https://www.aliexpress.com/item/English-Alphabet-Capital-Letter-Rubber-Stamp-Free-Combination-DIY-Seal-Pattern-Stamps/32717795321.html), though I adjusted the numbers of letters that I brought to the workshop according to [letter frequency](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_frequency) in major European languages - in a London-based workshop, there isn't much use for all 20× _Z_s, _Q_s or _X_s, though there may be in other areas/cultures.
Alternative options include using individual [animal stamps](#20) or similar - these stamps are low-cost and much more widely available than letter stamps.
- **Typewriter** - you can buy them from second-hand shops or markets (I bought a Brother _750 Deluxe_ in Paekākāriki for NZ$35, and an Olivetti _Valentine_ for NZ$90 in Mayfield). Depending on your location, you may be able to hire one. For Mozilla Festival, I hired an East German _Erika_ from [London Typewriters](http://www.londontypewriters.co.uk/). (For this typewriter, the hire price was £40, or it was £105 to buy).
![Why we use a typewriter](Images/typewriters.jpg)
A typewriter may seem like a silly novelty or some kind of just-for-show hipster accessory, but it's actually an extremely functional tool for this workshop, as it allows you to type standardised, easily legible type _directly onto_ an existing work. The fact that it is really fun is a pleasant side effect :)
## Optional:
- **Typography** for titles, graphics etc. [Letraset](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letraset) letters are probably overkill, but you could likely make nice hedings by printing out [these alphabet sheets](Print/Typography/) in different typefaces and weights, and allowing participants to cut and glue them into place as needed.
- **Typography** for titles, graphics etc. [Letraset](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letraset) letters are probably overkill, but you could likely make nice hedings by printing out alphabet sheets (roughly following letter frequency) in different typefaces and weights, and allowing participants to cut and glue them into place as needed.
- **Public Domain / Free Culture imagery** - to provide participants with a wide variety of ready-made, ready-to use art, photography, and illustrations which they can work into new forms.
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- **Public Domain / Free Culture imagery** - to provide participants with a wide variety of ready-made, ready-to use art, photography, and illustrations which they can work into new forms. You can get started with these [Noun Project illustrations](Print/Noun-Project-Illustrations/).
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ta-da! now we have the original, and a copy.
![an arrow points from the original to an expanding file, and from the copy to a 'help wanted' board](Images/Demo\ sketches/13_file.png)
I will file the original in the repository, and add my copy to the 'help wanted' nopticeboard. Let's think about how others might be able to take this further.
I will file the original in the repository, and add my copy to the 'help wanted' noticeboard. Let's think about how others might be able to take this further.
![a note saying 'how about an illustration?' is added to the copy on noticeboard](Images/Demo\ sketches/14_suggestion.png)
Let's see if somebody wants to work on the visual appeal of this work.
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Assignment: [What does working open mean for Cut, Copy & Paste?](https://mozilla.github.io/open-leadership-training-series/articles/introduction-to-open-leadership/understanding-the-project-lead-role/#assignment--reflecting-on-benefits-and-challenges-of-working-open)
## Benefits
- I am forced to formulate & publicise ideas in a coherent and inviting way, which helps communicate the process and make its value more clear.
- Others have a resource which they can immediately take on and adapt to their needs. If they want to run a workshop, or get inspiration to develop something similar, they don't need to ask my permission.
- all of the [other benefits I'm always harping on about](http://community.oscedays.org/t/why-should-i-document-my-challenge/4935).
## Challenges
- Artists & other non-techies are unlikely to know in advance that this is a process they might find valuable - they're not currently searching the internet asking _"how can I/my group learn about open source in a non-techy way?"_
This means that for the project to succeed, I have to develop an effective teaser of some kind - a way of communicating the benefits of open source collaboration very quickly, which people will want to dive deeper into through a workshop or other resources.
- The closer we go to the real open source collaborative process, the more technology is required (digital or not). So finding the right balance for a particular group's experience and interest levels will likely be tricky. Likewise for the person or group running the workshop.
- Open source collaboration is complex (that's why we do it digitally!) Finding others who want to run workshops or contribute improvements may be difficult, i.e. it may be difficult to convince techy folks that there is value in a lo-tech approach, and it may be difficult to convince non-techy folks that it's worthwhile to learn this whole version-control and digital collaboration thing.
## Limitations
- There are currently very few artistic/non-software projects already working in a peer production/open source way. So there are not a lot of great examples to work from.
- Whenever I have a choice, I prefer not to use proprietary software and services, _particularly_ as a structure upon which to build commons. So I would prefer to use Gitlab over Github, but that is not where the majority of open source contributors are, and that is also not where the other Mozilla Open Leaders projects will be developed.
- Cut, Copy & Paste is not my full-time project. I am busy making another animation right now, and editing a couple of videos, and developing my main project, [_Open Source Animation for Activism, Education and Civic Organisations_](https://gitlab.com/cameralibre/FragDenStaat-Animation). So the time and energy I can put into this is limited.
# Open Canvas
link to the filled-in [Google Docs template](https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1Fdee_3CIcxntSnrFc6YEhJxMYy8S64TNsjOKVrtYLvc/edit?usp=sharing)
## Project Title: Cut, Copy & Paste
### Problem
- The way we create/ think about artistic work can devalue or impede remix and 'derivative' works, focusing instead on individual brilliance and ownership.
- Creative collaboration is generally restricted to a small group of known participants in the same place.
- Open source is often seen as just for software, not culture.
- It’s hard to see the value of OS without directly experiencing it for yourself.
### Solution
- Give artists a fun, tangible & inclusive experience of OS collaboration, to get them thinking & working in this way.
### Key Metrics
- Workshops run by myself and others
- OER Modules created and used
- Open projects created by participants
### Resources Required
- space & occasion to run a workshop
- equipment eg photocopier, stamps
- public domain materials
- introductory website for the project
- expertise on facilitation, the needs of students and artists, feedback on process
### Contributor Profiles
[Open Source Design](http://opensourcedesign.net/) & [Study Collaboration](http://studycollaboration.com/) community members, facilitators focused on collaboration, teachers & students of art & design schools
### User Profiles
- Art schools & festivals
- MozFest & [Open Source Design Summit](http://opensourcedesign.net/summit/) attendees
- Community members of [OSCEdays](https://oscedays.org/) and other groups introducing OS to newbies.
### Contributor Channels
- Workshops
- [CC Open Education platform](https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/cc-openedu)
- not-yet-existent project website
- [Gitlab](https://gitlab.com/cameralibre/cut-copy-and-paste) issues
- [OSD forum](Workshops, Twitter, project website, Gitlab issues, OSD forum)
### User Channels
- running workshops
- not-yet-existent project website
- Twitter
- Art schools & festivals
### Unique Value Proposition
- Gain a hands-on understanding of the creative and surprising world of digital ‘Open Source’ collaboration, and see its potential for limitless artistic creation - all using tools no more complicated than scissors, rubber stamps and a photocopier.
# Vision Statement
During our [intial call](https://public.etherpad-mozilla.org/p/ol4-cohort-c), we were given 5 minutes to come up with a vision statement for our project, using the following template:
> I’m working with [community, allies, contributors] to [make, build, teach, or do something] so that [audience, end users, consumers, community members] can [do something different, achieve a goal]
## Cut, Copy & Paste
I'm working with experienced facilitators and open source designers to develop and host hands-on co-creation workshops so that people without much tech background (especially artists, illustrators, designers and animators) can understand open source methodology and use it to collaboratively create free culture together.
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This folder contains explanatory posters of different elements in the workshop, so that participants are able to learn on their own or teach others, without relying on the facilitator as a single point of information.
Printable PDFs and editable SVGs are provided - _CC-BY-SA-WTF_ is A4 (portrait), the others are A3 (landscape).
## Posters
- **How to Commit** - a step-by-step outline of the workflow at the commit table:
![How To Commit](How-To-Commit.png)
- **Commit Example** - showing an original work, its remix, and the commit being entered:
![Commit Example](Commit-Example.png)
- **Where To File Copies** - showing what to do with the original and copy, after you have committed:
![Where To File Copies](Where-To-File-Copies.png)
- **CC-BY-SA-WTF** - an explanation of CC-BY-SA and open source licensing in general:
![CC-BY-SA-WTF](CC-BY-SA-WTF.png)
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In this folder you'll find printable PDFs in A4 (landscape) and A3 (portrait) format, as well as the editable SVGs should you wish to make any changes. It uses the [Futura Renner](https://fontlibrary.org/en/font/futura-renner) typeface.
The A3 portrait format is preferred (I get these printed at a copy shop before each workshop), but if you only have access to an A4 printer, then you should print both the standard A4 landscape version _and_ some copies of the A4 'continued' version. This is because the Commit Log header and metadata take up a lot of valuable space on an A4 page. To maximise space, use the 'continued' version for every page after the first page - you can staple the pages together afterwards to ensure that you don't lose track of commits.
![Commit Log](../../Images/README-Images/Commit-Log.png)
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