...
 
Commits (2)
Title: A Cup of Tea
Date: 2018/01/09
# A Cup of Tea September 2018 – January 2019
I was invited to work as a curator for a community project called A Cup of Tea, facilitated by artist Liga Valge with 14 women who use the Forward Steps Family Resource Centre in Tullow, Carlow.
The project brought together women of 6 different nationalities living in Tullow. Liga and I supported the group to explore integration, social inclusion, multi-culturalism while making ceramic tea pots, and sharing conversation and many cups of tea together.
The women were from various backgrounds and they met every week to make teapots, to discuss their relationships to the village they live in and to share tea and cake together. This project aimed to empower women in the community to develop relationships and to share experiences of community engagement. It proved to be incredibly generative space to solve issues together and share knowledge from past experiences of moving to a new community.
I co-ordinated the documentation of this project, built a website in collaboration with Colm O'Neill, made a video piece bringing together the work by the participating women. The project was exhibited at the Forward Steps FRC, in Thrive Cafe, Tullow and at the VISUAL Center for Contemporary Arts.
The website can be found at http://acupoftea.ie/
Title: A Cup of Tea
Date: 2018/01/09
save_as: cup_of_tea_index.html
# A Cup of Tea September 2018 – January 2019
I was invited to work as a curator for a community project called A Cup of Tea, facilitated by artist Liga Valge with 14 women who use the Forward Steps Family Resource Centre in Tullow, Carlow.
The project brought together women of 6 different nationalities living in Tullow. Liga and I supported the group to explore integration, social inclusion, multi-culturalism while making ceramic tea pots, and sharing conversation and many cups of tea together.
The women were from various backgrounds and they met every week to make teapots, to discuss their relationships to the village they live in and to share tea and cake together. This project aimed to empower women in the community to develop relationships and to share experiences of community engagement. It proved to be incredibly generative space to solve issues together and share knowledge from past experiences of moving to a new community.
I co-ordinated the documentation of this project, built a website in collaboration with Colm O'Neill, made a video piece bringing together the work by the participating women. The project was exhibited at the Forward Steps FRC, in Thrive Cafe, Tullow and at the VISUAL Center for Contemporary Arts.
The website can be found at http://acupoftea.ie/
......@@ -2,7 +2,6 @@ Title: index
Date: 2017/04
Featured_image: images/Anni-breadfellow.png
save_as: documenta_index.html
Status: draft
# Documenta Chorus Breadfellows sessions
......
Title: documenta 14
Date: 2017/04
# In April 2017 I moved to Athens to work as part of the documenta14 education team as a member of the chorus.
What shifts? What drifts? What remains? were three questions that created the climate of inquiry for documenta 14’s aneducation. The program, developed relationships with learning institutions, artist-run spaces, and neighborhoods to investigate the correlation between art, education, and the aesthetics of human togetherness.
Traditional art education and mediation relies on the basis of a script; aneducation's methodology relied on the competencies and biographies of documenta 14 chorus members to facilitate spaces for dialogue and exchange, responding to the exhibitions together. The chorus was made up of artists, researchers, archeologists, anthropologists, musicians and activists and rather than "tours" we developed "walks" that were as dependent on our own perspectives as the public who came on walks with us.
I gave walks and workshops for adults and children across the city, aneducation was a daily practice and a public learning. It addresses education as an open form, referring to the methodology of Oskar and Zofia Hansen, and as a space for spontaneous gestures and occurrences that “will awaken the desire of existence.” We gave walks through rather than a walks around the exhbitions; learning with and through the artworks.
Title: documenta 14
Date: 2017/04
save_as: documenta_14_index.html
# In April 2017 I moved to Athens to work as part of the documenta14 education team as a member of the chorus.
What shifts? What drifts? What remains? were three questions that created the climate of inquiry for documenta 14’s aneducation. The program, developed relationships with learning institutions, artist-run spaces, and neighborhoods to investigate the correlation between art, education, and the aesthetics of human togetherness.
Traditional art education and mediation relies on the basis of a script; aneducation's methodology relied on the competencies and biographies of documenta 14 chorus members to facilitate spaces for dialogue and exchange, responding to the exhibitions together. The chorus was made up of artists, researchers, archeologists, anthropologists, musicians and activists and rather than "tours" we developed "walks" that were as dependent on our own perspectives as the public who came on walks with us.
I gave walks and workshops for adults and children across the city, aneducation was a daily practice and a public learning. It addresses education as an open form, referring to the methodology of Oskar and Zofia Hansen, and as a space for spontaneous gestures and occurrences that “will awaken the desire of existence.” We gave walks through rather than a walks around the exhbitions; learning with and through the artworks.
Title: index
Date: 2018/01/26
featured_image: images/living-arts-project-2018-19/the_colours_the_mess.jpg
save_as: I_sing_the_body_electric_index.html
Homepage_summary: I Sing the Body Electric was a 4 week project with 3rd and 4th class at Raheenagh National School, Limerick. It was part of EVA International 2018's school programme curated by Jennie Guy's Art School.
Jennie Guy's was invited by Matt Packer, through her project Art School, to develop a schools programme introducing children to the concept of the curator and the ecology of exhibitions that make up EVA International. Jennie was particularly drawn to the Sean Keating painting The Night Candles Are Burnt Out which led to a reconsideration of the Walt Whitman poem I Sing the Body Electric. An interpretation of this poem is that it gives focus to the complexity of the human body and its own inherent ecosystems.
Jennie invited me, through her Art School project, to respond to this title, thinking through the poem, its themes and the upcoming exhibition to develop a 4 week programme at Raheenagh National School.
Through collaborative making and conversation, responding to the artworks and concepts of EVA International I developed four workshops, culminating in an exhibition in Raheenagh National School.
Children give meaning to the world around them through the development of narratives. Constructively learning, learning through listening to one another and developing tools for encountering the world together brings an awareness that the world is something shared. I developed 4 workshops which were focused on collaborative making, collective thinking and curation as a form of care.
I Sing the Body Electric occurred before EVA opened. From the outset I knew it was possible that the children might not see the exhibition. For this reason I was keen to engage with the themes and artworks of EVA, but to develop a project that could work for the children in their classroom as a stand-alone creative experience.
Within an ecology of learning with and from an exhibition on this scale, I consider the conversations and artworks generated in the classroom by the children in response to EVA's themes and artworks to be as valuable as any other aspect of the public programme. For this reason, I understood the space of the classroom as an extension of EVA, like a little satellite of learning orbiting the exhibition, generating new responses and artworks, even if in this instance, we were just an audience of ourselves.
Title: index
Date: 2018/01/26
featured_image: images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/lightning.png
save_as: I_sing_the_body_electric_index.html
Homepage_summary: I Sing the Body Electric was a 4 week project with 3rd and 4th class at Raheenagh National School, Limerick. It was part of EVA International 2018's school programme curated by Jennie Guy's Art School.
Jennie Guy's was invited by Matt Packer, through her project Art School, to develop a schools programme introducing children to the concept of the curator and the ecology of exhibitions that make up EVA International. Jennie was particularly drawn to the Sean Keating painting The Night Candles Are Burnt Out which led to a reconsideration of the Walt Whitman poem I Sing the Body Electric. An interpretation of this poem is that it gives focus to the complexity of the human body and its own inherent ecosystems.
Jennie invited me, through her Art School project, to respond to this title, thinking through the poem, its themes and the upcoming exhibition to develop a 4 week programme at Raheenagh National School.
Through collaborative making and conversation, responding to the artworks and concepts of EVA International I developed four workshops, culminating in an exhibition in Raheenagh National School.
Children give meaning to the world around them through the development of narratives. Constructively learning, learning through listening to one another and developing tools for encountering the world together brings an awareness that the world is something shared. I developed 4 workshops which were focused on collaborative making, collective thinking and curation as a form of care.
I Sing the Body Electric occurred before EVA opened. From the outset I knew it was possible that the children might not see the exhibition. For this reason I was keen to engage with the themes and artworks of EVA, but to develop a project that could work for the children in their classroom as a stand-alone creative experience.
Within an ecology of learning with and from an exhibition on this scale, I consider the conversations and artworks generated in the classroom by the children in response to EVA's themes and artworks to be as valuable as any other aspect of the public programme. For this reason, I understood the space of the classroom as an extension of EVA, like a little satellite of learning orbiting the exhibition, generating new responses and artworks, even if in this instance, we were just an audience of ourselves.
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 1
Date: 2018/01/26
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.12.jpg
# Breadfellows' Chats
I began the series of four workshops with Breadfellow' Chats. This is a practice of collaboratively making ceramics to use to share a meal, it foregrounds talking, making together and sharing food as intimate gestures of care.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/w1.01.JPG)
We began the Breadfellows' Chats with a simple, collaborative drawing exercise. The children listed and drew food - they thought about sharing a meal together comprised of the most delicious, disgusting or fantastic food they could imagine.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.03.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.04.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.05.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Working in pairs they shaped the clay into collaboratively made ceramic "companions" of their own design. These ceramics are called companions. Companion means friend - someone or something you spend time with.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.06.jpg)
The word companion is dervied from the Latin “com”, meaning with and the French “panis” meaning bread, so companion literally means "with bread"; sharing bread together, or breadfellows.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.07.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.08.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.09.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.10.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.11.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.12.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.13.jpg)
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 1
Date: 2018/01/26
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.12.jpg
# Breadfellows' Chats
I began the series of four workshops with Breadfellow' Chats. This is a practice of collaboratively making ceramics to use to share a meal, it foregrounds talking, making together and sharing food as intimate gestures of care.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/w1.01.JPG)
We began the Breadfellows' Chats with a simple, collaborative drawing exercise. The children listed and drew food - they thought about sharing a meal together comprised of the most delicious, disgusting or fantastic food they could imagine.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.03.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.04.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.05.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Working in pairs they shaped the clay into collaboratively made ceramic "companions" of their own design. These ceramics are called companions. Companion means friend - someone or something you spend time with.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.06.jpg)
The word companion is dervied from the Latin “com”, meaning with and the French “panis” meaning bread, so companion literally means "with bread"; sharing bread together, or breadfellows.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.07.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.08.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.09.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.10.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.11.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.12.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.13.jpg)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week1/wk1.14.jpg)
\ No newline at end of file
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 2
Date: 2018/02/09
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.01.JPG
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.01.JPG)
In the second week I introduced the role of the curator to the children we talked about what a curator does. We looked at some of the artworks in EVA through the eyes of a curator, trying to understand what these artworks are and what they need to be happy in the world.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.05.JPG)
The following is an excerpt from our conversation
Clare : Does anyone know what a curator is?
Children: no
Clare : Does anyone know what an exhibition is?
Children: Yes, they're in museums..... an exhibition is when you've done all your hard work and you want to show it off to people, what you've done.
Clare : So in my opinion, what a curator does is a very important job. Curators take care of artists and artworks. Do any of you take care of something?
Children: My dog....my little brother... babys...rabbits.....animals....your family....pets.... baby cousins.... your belongings.
Clare : And is it easy or difficult to take care of something?
Children: Hard..... easy..... especially if you love it alot. That means its easy. For a baby, you have to take care for a long, long time.
Clare : Does anyone take care of you?
Children: Mam...dad....nanny and grandad....friends....teachers
Clare : If you really want to take care of something you have to do a lot of work,what kinds of things do you have to do?
Children: Giving it food, giving it somewhere to sleep.... keeping it clean.... tickling it, playing with it....giving it clothes
Clare : You think about all the needs of the thing you take care of. So taking care of artworks is sort of the same. Curators read about artworks, they research them, they think about what they need, where they like to be, they decide where artworks should go. What do you think an artwork wants most in the world?
Children: For people to see it...to appreciate all of your hard work
Clare : If you were an artwork what would you like most?
Children: For people to see you and love you and buy you...... to admire you.
Clare : So not all artworks are beautiful, sometimes they are sad, sometimes they are supposed to make people angry, or to think about something they never thought of before. Sometimes you have to think very carefully at an exhibition. Curators spend all their time caring for artworks and thinking about them. Its a curators job to look very closely at the artwork, to decide what angle it looks best from, to decide when to put things together and when to leave something with lots of space.
Children: So curators are like Mammies of artworks? Or like teachers?
Clare : Yes, in ways I think so. Like any person who takes care of something.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.06.JPG)
After these conversations the children came together in groups and enacted some of these artworks with their bodies, these included works by
Sean Keating,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.15.jpg){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/The_night_candles_are_burnt_out_sean_keating.jpg){.half-grid}
{.grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.08.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/Patrizio_Di_Massimo_Mum_2014.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.09.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Mainie Jellet,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.04.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/mainie_jellet.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
John Gerrard,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.11.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/2014_SolarReserve_Lincoln_Gerrard_02_Ewing.jpg){.half-grid}
{.grid}
Sam Keogh,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.14.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/Sam_Keogh_Captain_Cadaverine.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
and Isabel Nolan.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.13.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/isabel.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 2
Date: 2018/02/09
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.01.JPG
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.01.JPG)
In the second week I introduced the role of the curator to the children we talked about what a curator does. We looked at some of the artworks in EVA through the eyes of a curator, trying to understand what these artworks are and what they need to be happy in the world.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.05.JPG)
The following is an excerpt from our conversation
Clare : Does anyone know what a curator is?
Children: no
Clare : Does anyone know what an exhibition is?
Children: Yes, they're in museums..... an exhibition is when you've done all your hard work and you want to show it off to people, what you've done.
Clare : So in my opinion, what a curator does is a very important job. Curators take care of artists and artworks. Do any of you take care of something?
Children: My dog....my little brother... babys...rabbits.....animals....your family....pets.... baby cousins.... your belongings.
Clare : And is it easy or difficult to take care of something?
Children: Hard..... easy..... especially if you love it alot. That means its easy. For a baby, you have to take care for a long, long time.
Clare : Does anyone take care of you?
Children: Mam...dad....nanny and grandad....friends....teachers
Clare : If you really want to take care of something you have to do a lot of work,what kinds of things do you have to do?
Children: Giving it food, giving it somewhere to sleep.... keeping it clean.... tickling it, playing with it....giving it clothes
Clare : You think about all the needs of the thing you take care of. So taking care of artworks is sort of the same. Curators read about artworks, they research them, they think about what they need, where they like to be, they decide where artworks should go. What do you think an artwork wants most in the world?
Children: For people to see it...to appreciate all of your hard work
Clare : If you were an artwork what would you like most?
Children: For people to see you and love you and buy you...... to admire you.
Clare : So not all artworks are beautiful, sometimes they are sad, sometimes they are supposed to make people angry, or to think about something they never thought of before. Sometimes you have to think very carefully at an exhibition. Curators spend all their time caring for artworks and thinking about them. Its a curators job to look very closely at the artwork, to decide what angle it looks best from, to decide when to put things together and when to leave something with lots of space.
Children: So curators are like Mammies of artworks? Or like teachers?
Clare : Yes, in ways I think so. Like any person who takes care of something.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.06.JPG)
After these conversations the children came together in groups and enacted some of these artworks with their bodies, these included works by
Sean Keating,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.15.jpg){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/The_night_candles_are_burnt_out_sean_keating.jpg){.half-grid}
{.grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.08.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/Patrizio_Di_Massimo_Mum_2014.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.09.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Mainie Jellet,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.04.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/mainie_jellet.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
John Gerrard,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.11.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/2014_SolarReserve_Lincoln_Gerrard_02_Ewing.jpg){.half-grid}
{.grid}
Sam Keogh,
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.14.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/Sam_Keogh_Captain_Cadaverine.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
and Isabel Nolan.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/wk2.13.JPG){.half-grid}
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week2/isabel.PNG){.half-grid}
{.grid}
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 3
Date: 2018/02/23
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.05.JPG
Between the 2nd and 3rd week the children made their own artworks inspired by and responding to the EVA artworks and the themes of electicity and the body. On the third week we gathered together all of the work the children had made and developed an exhibition for their classroom. All decisions about this exhibition from the title of the show, to the layout of the room, the positioning of the works and the food served at the exhibition were made by the children.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.01.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.02.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.03.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.04.JPG)
They made plans of the classroom, maquettes of the artworks and decided together how they could change the classroom space and how to best works and accommodate visitors to their exhibition.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.05.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.06.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.07.JPG)
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 3
Date: 2018/02/23
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.05.JPG
Between the 2nd and 3rd week the children made their own artworks inspired by and responding to the EVA artworks and the themes of electicity and the body. On the third week we gathered together all of the work the children had made and developed an exhibition for their classroom. All decisions about this exhibition from the title of the show, to the layout of the room, the positioning of the works and the food served at the exhibition were made by the children.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.01.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.02.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.03.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.04.JPG)
They made plans of the classroom, maquettes of the artworks and decided together how they could change the classroom space and how to best works and accommodate visitors to their exhibition.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.05.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.06.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/week3/wk3.07.JPG)
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 4
Date: 2018/03/9
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.17.JPG
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.06.JPG)
On the 4th week we hosted an exhibition in the classroom which was attended by parents, grandparents and the rest of the school. The exhibition included the ceramics made in week 1, filled with food; drawings and sculptures responding to EVA's
themes of electricity and the body; texts written in response to artworks in EVA and images of their performances.
Over the course of four weeks, the classroom became a space for open dialogue, performance and a studio and exhibition space.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.05.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.08.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.09.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.10.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.11.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.12.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.13.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.14.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.15.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.16.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.17.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.18.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.19.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.20.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.21.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.22.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.23.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.24.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.25.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.26.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.27.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.28.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.29.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.31.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.32.JPG)
Title: I Sing the Body Electric - week 4
Date: 2018/03/9
Featured_image: /images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.17.JPG
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.06.JPG)
On the 4th week we hosted an exhibition in the classroom which was attended by parents, grandparents and the rest of the school. The exhibition included the ceramics made in week 1, filled with food; drawings and sculptures responding to EVA's
themes of electricity and the body; texts written in response to artworks in EVA and images of their performances.
Over the course of four weeks, the classroom became a space for open dialogue, performance and a studio and exhibition space.
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.05.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.08.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.09.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.10.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.11.JPG)
![](/images/I-sing-the-body-electric/Week4/w4.12.JPG)
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Title: Katherine MacBride - Week 5
Date: 2017/11/22
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Katherine_mcbride.jpg
# Katherine MacBride
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine1.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Katherine is an artist who is interested in how people, animals, plants and things live together. At the moment she is working a lot with listening — listening with your ears to what other people are saying with their voices, listening with your body to what other people are saying with their bodies…listening with all your senses to pay really careful attention to how everything is all connected together and how our actions affect each other all the time even when we aren’t aware of it.
She’s trying to understand how to listen to things like the environment that might not have a voice and how to listen attentively so we can take good care of each other. Katherine often works to make things with other people.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine3.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
She likes to do things with words and language, but she also likes to make objects out of cloth and clay, and sometimes she likes to take photographs and make films.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine2.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
This week Katherine came to visit the school. We began with simple movement exercises: walking from point A to point B without bumping into one another, walking like robots, walking with very heavy feet, walking like your entire body was a magnet.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine18.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Then Katherine introduced herself and her work to the class and they introduced themselves and their work to her.
We began with a game designed to help us think about instructions, giving one another instructions and following instructions. Everyone made up an instruction for a body, for example: touch your toes, lick your nose, do 20 pushups, pretend to do a "number 2", sleepwalk.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine14.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine15.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine16.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote1.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote4.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote3.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote2.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote5.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote6.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
Each person took one of these instructions from the pile and acted it out. We performed these for one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine22.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine23.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine21.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
We went through a number of other exercises that helped us think about our bodies in relation to one another and making sounds. We made loud sounds and soft sounds, we breathed loudly and quietly and tried to move together with our eyes closed.
At the end of the workshop we made a score together that mapped our work that day. Everyone took turns adding to the document and we tried to make a drawing that described our day, to add as many details as we could collectively think of. We worked together so we wouldn't forget anything.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine20.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine19.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Title: Katherine MacBride - Week 5
Date: 2017/11/22
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Katherine_mcbride.jpg
# Katherine MacBride
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine1.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Katherine is an artist who is interested in how people, animals, plants and things live together. At the moment she is working a lot with listening — listening with your ears to what other people are saying with their voices, listening with your body to what other people are saying with their bodies…listening with all your senses to pay really careful attention to how everything is all connected together and how our actions affect each other all the time even when we aren’t aware of it.
She’s trying to understand how to listen to things like the environment that might not have a voice and how to listen attentively so we can take good care of each other. Katherine often works to make things with other people.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine3.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
She likes to do things with words and language, but she also likes to make objects out of cloth and clay, and sometimes she likes to take photographs and make films.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine2.jpeg){.image-process-fullwidth}
This week Katherine came to visit the school. We began with simple movement exercises: walking from point A to point B without bumping into one another, walking like robots, walking with very heavy feet, walking like your entire body was a magnet.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Katherine18.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Then Katherine introduced herself and her work to the class and they introduced themselves and their work to her.
We began with a game designed to help us think about instructions, giving one another instructions and following instructions. Everyone made up an instruction for a body, for example: touch your toes, lick your nose, do 20 pushups, pretend to do a "number 2", sleepwalk.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine14.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine15.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine16.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote1.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote4.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote3.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote2.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote5.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherinenote6.jpeg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
Each person took one of these instructions from the pile and acted it out. We performed these for one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine22.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine23.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine21.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
We went through a number of other exercises that helped us think about our bodies in relation to one another and making sounds. We made loud sounds and soft sounds, we breathed loudly and quietly and tried to move together with our eyes closed.
At the end of the workshop we made a score together that mapped our work that day. Everyone took turns adding to the document and we tried to make a drawing that described our day, to add as many details as we could collectively think of. We worked together so we wouldn't forget anything.
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine20.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/katherine19.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
Title: Madison Bycroft - Week 11
Date: 2018/01/31
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Madi_profile.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/402575064&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
# Madison Bycroft
![](/images/living-arts-project/Madi.png)
Madison is an Australian artist currently living between Paris and Adelaide. Madison makes performances, sculptures, videos, drawings, paintings and writes all about the possibilities of language. Madison makes art all the time, everyday, at the computer, in the studio, with other people or alone. Madison collects ideas from every place and is always questioning what it means to be an artist.
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi1.jpg)
Madison also thinks about bodies, different bodies and why our bodies are the way they are. Madison is especially interested in bodies that are different to human bodies, bodies that use their senses differently, and bodies that don't live in a human world and what our human bodies can learn from these other bodies.
Madison wonders about how we can communicate better with one another and form better friendships, not just with humans but with animals too.
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi2.jpg)
Madison sent a poem for us to try to translate
# Who knows what kinds of sounds there were before the dogs started barking. But once they had begun their bark it had begun. Who knows what kinds of sounds there were before the beginning. The dogs announce, the dogs herald. The hounding heralds, the heralding hounds. The dogs barked and were barked too.
#aaaaaaaaaaaaooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuu, aaaaaaaaaoooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuu
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi5.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi6.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi7.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi8.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi9.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi10.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi11.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi12.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi13.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi14.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi15.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi16.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi17.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
Title: Madison Bycroft - Week 11
Date: 2018/01/31
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Madi_profile.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/402575064&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
# Madison Bycroft
![](/images/living-arts-project/Madi.png)
Madison is an Australian artist currently living between Paris and Adelaide. Madison makes performances, sculptures, videos, drawings, paintings and writes all about the possibilities of language. Madison makes art all the time, everyday, at the computer, in the studio, with other people or alone. Madison collects ideas from every place and is always questioning what it means to be an artist.
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi1.jpg)
Madison also thinks about bodies, different bodies and why our bodies are the way they are. Madison is especially interested in bodies that are different to human bodies, bodies that use their senses differently, and bodies that don't live in a human world and what our human bodies can learn from these other bodies.
Madison wonders about how we can communicate better with one another and form better friendships, not just with humans but with animals too.
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi2.jpg)
Madison sent a poem for us to try to translate
# Who knows what kinds of sounds there were before the dogs started barking. But once they had begun their bark it had begun. Who knows what kinds of sounds there were before the beginning. The dogs announce, the dogs herald. The hounding heralds, the heralding hounds. The dogs barked and were barked too.
#aaaaaaaaaaaaooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuu, aaaaaaaaaoooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuu
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi5.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi6.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi7.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi8.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi9.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi10.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi11.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi12.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi13.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi14.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi15.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi16.JPG){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/madi17.JPG){.third-centered }
{.grid}
Title: Sarah De Wilde - Week 12
Date: 2018/02/07
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/flamingo2.jpg
# Sarah De Wilde
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry10.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry12.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry14.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry15.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry2.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry3.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry4.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry5.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry6.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry7.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry9.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry16.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Yannis gave Sarah some chrysanthemums one day and she began taking pictures of them. Each day the light was different and so the picture was different, she used the camera to capture all of these tiny differences, to show all of the beautiful, small changes the angles and the light made to them.
Sarah sometimes thinks of a photograph as a kind of “instant painting”.
Sarah looks carefully at things in her everyday life and uses the camera as a way to change her view of the world. With a change in light and frame, a small potted plant in your kitchen could become a huge palm in the jungle at night time.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sdw.jpg)
Sarah takes pictures all the time, looking very closely at things. She uses the frame of the lens, playing with focus, colour and light to transform everyday life into beautiful, exotic images.
Sarah once turned a whole gallery green.
![](/images/living-arts-project/greenroom2.jpg){.half-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/greenroom.jpg){.half-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
This played a trick on visitor's eyes, and they adjusted to try to take in more red colour. In the last room of the exhibition were photographs of flamingos. Everyone's eyes had adjusted to the green and so these flamingos were even brighter, brilliant pinks and reds!
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo0.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo1.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo2.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
The class tried some exercises Sarah had suggested to help them understand and play with focus, the eyes focuses in the same way a camera does. They played with depth perception, focusing from one finger to the other. This exercise brought an awareness to the mechanics of how the eye looks. They also tried some blind drawing and framing exercises.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah2.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah3.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Still thinking about framing, the class chose and cut coloured gels and used them to view the room, to frame objects in the room and look at the room from a wide angle and in very close detail, imagining the frame like the lens of a camera.
![](/images/living-arts-project/IMG_7716.JPG)
The class took these gels and placed them on the windows. Using acrylic paint, they picked out the form of objects in the garden, looking at the surface of the gel and through it to the garden they could see beyond it.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah6.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah11.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
This collage of images grew and were layed over one another. Moving from things they could see in the garden the class added objects that weren't in the garden, painting layers of colour through and over one another, adding monkeys, neon signs, trucks and fairies to the garden.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah9.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah4.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah5.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah8.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah13.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah14.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah15.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah12.jpg)
Title: Sarah De Wilde - Week 12
Date: 2018/02/07
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/flamingo2.jpg
# Sarah De Wilde
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry10.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry12.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry14.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry15.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry2.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry3.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry4.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry5.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry6.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry7.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry9.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/chry16.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Yannis gave Sarah some chrysanthemums one day and she began taking pictures of them. Each day the light was different and so the picture was different, she used the camera to capture all of these tiny differences, to show all of the beautiful, small changes the angles and the light made to them.
Sarah sometimes thinks of a photograph as a kind of “instant painting”.
Sarah looks carefully at things in her everyday life and uses the camera as a way to change her view of the world. With a change in light and frame, a small potted plant in your kitchen could become a huge palm in the jungle at night time.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sdw.jpg)
Sarah takes pictures all the time, looking very closely at things. She uses the frame of the lens, playing with focus, colour and light to transform everyday life into beautiful, exotic images.
Sarah once turned a whole gallery green.
![](/images/living-arts-project/greenroom2.jpg){.half-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/greenroom.jpg){.half-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
This played a trick on visitor's eyes, and they adjusted to try to take in more red colour. In the last room of the exhibition were photographs of flamingos. Everyone's eyes had adjusted to the green and so these flamingos were even brighter, brilliant pinks and reds!
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo0.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo1.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/flamingo2.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
The class tried some exercises Sarah had suggested to help them understand and play with focus, the eyes focuses in the same way a camera does. They played with depth perception, focusing from one finger to the other. This exercise brought an awareness to the mechanics of how the eye looks. They also tried some blind drawing and framing exercises.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah2.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah3.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Still thinking about framing, the class chose and cut coloured gels and used them to view the room, to frame objects in the room and look at the room from a wide angle and in very close detail, imagining the frame like the lens of a camera.
![](/images/living-arts-project/IMG_7716.JPG)
The class took these gels and placed them on the windows. Using acrylic paint, they picked out the form of objects in the garden, looking at the surface of the gel and through it to the garden they could see beyond it.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah6.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah11.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
This collage of images grew and were layed over one another. Moving from things they could see in the garden the class added objects that weren't in the garden, painting layers of colour through and over one another, adding monkeys, neon signs, trucks and fairies to the garden.
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah9.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah4.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah5.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah8.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah13.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah14.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah15.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/sarah12.jpg)
Title: Angelica Falkeling - Week 2
Date: 2017/10/25
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Angelica_Pass_this_On.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/353248676&amp;color=%23ff9900&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
# Week 2 - responding to the work of Angelica Falkeling
![](/images/living-arts-project/Angelica_Pass_this_On.png){.half-centered }
Angelica is an artist who thinks about trust, identity and love and makes sculptures, films, clothes and performances. Angelica's workshop will be about pockets.
We will consider the utility of clothes. Who makes them and what are they for? Which clothes are fancy? Which are not? How do we dress for a brithday party? a job interview? a sleepover? a trip to the airport?
![](/images/living-arts-project/Angelica_pass_this_on_detail.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/angelica_pocket_samples.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/angelica_installation_shot.jpg){.third-centered }
{.grid}
What does it mean if our clothes are useful? Do we have pockets? How do pockets change our clothes? Are girls and boys clothes different and why?
Angelica designed a jacket as a gift for the feminist politician Soraya Post, we looked at this design, talked about the fabric, the shape and how it was made. After we talked through these questions the children returned to the tunics they had painted in the first weeks and added pockets, ties and cut them out so they could be worn. We thought of ways to make them more useful, more beautiful or more comfy. We also talked about what our clothes are for and what they say about us.
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket5.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket7.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket15.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket16.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket19.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket12.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket3.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket4.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket10.JPG)
Title: Angelica Falkeling - Week 2
Date: 2017/10/25
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Angelica_Pass_this_On.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/353248676&amp;color=%23ff9900&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
# Week 2 - responding to the work of Angelica Falkeling
![](/images/living-arts-project/Angelica_Pass_this_On.png){.half-centered }
Angelica is an artist who thinks about trust, identity and love and makes sculptures, films, clothes and performances. Angelica's workshop will be about pockets.
We will consider the utility of clothes. Who makes them and what are they for? Which clothes are fancy? Which are not? How do we dress for a brithday party? a job interview? a sleepover? a trip to the airport?
![](/images/living-arts-project/Angelica_pass_this_on_detail.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/angelica_pocket_samples.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/angelica_installation_shot.jpg){.third-centered }
{.grid}
What does it mean if our clothes are useful? Do we have pockets? How do pockets change our clothes? Are girls and boys clothes different and why?
Angelica designed a jacket as a gift for the feminist politician Soraya Post, we looked at this design, talked about the fabric, the shape and how it was made. After we talked through these questions the children returned to the tunics they had painted in the first weeks and added pockets, ties and cut them out so they could be worn. We thought of ways to make them more useful, more beautiful or more comfy. We also talked about what our clothes are for and what they say about us.
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket5.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket7.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket15.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket16.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket19.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket12.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket3.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket4.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/pocket10.JPG)
Title: Clare Breen - Week 3 + 4
Date: 2017/11/8
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/breadfellows_companion.png
# Clare Breen
This project is called Breadfellows' Chats and it is about collaborative making, conversation and sharing, especially food.
![](/images/living-arts-project/companions.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
These ceramics are called companions. Companion means friend - someone or something you spend time with. The word companion is dervied from the Latin “com”, meaning with and the French “panis” meaning bread, so companion literally means "with bread"; sharing bread together, or breadfellows.
Companions are made by 2 people and they are part of a larger project, initiated by Clare Breen called the Breadfellows' Chats. In Breadfellows' Chats two people come together in conversation about art. This conversation inevitably touches every aspect of life. During this conversation they co-construct a ceramic object whose form is directly negotiated during this conversation - two sets of hands working together construct an object that holds within it the promise of a second meeting – to fulfil their practical funcion. The conversation that took place around the production of these objects is as important as the object itself. These objects are made by two people and are both artworks and functional tableware.
![](/images/living-arts-project/foundue2.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companionblue.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companiontracy.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companioncutlery.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companionkatinka.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companiondoublebowl.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
{.grid}
Coming together and sharing food is an important part of Clare's practice. Sharing a meal is an moment for intimacy. During meals we converse and share, it is also a time when much informal learning takes place. Sharing meals is a convivial ritual practiced all over the world. Clare is interested in taking time to learn constructively through one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/feast1.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/Feast2.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
In school we began by talking about food, delicious and disgusting food imaginging a feast we could share together with many delicious and disgusting dishes.
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.2.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.6.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.7.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.4.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
We then worked together to make companions that will be used to share a meal at the end of our project together.
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.9.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.10.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.1.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.10.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.8.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.9.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.13.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows1.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows2.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows5.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
Title: Clare Breen - Week 3 + 4
Date: 2017/11/8
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/breadfellows_companion.png
# Clare Breen
This project is called Breadfellows' Chats and it is about collaborative making, conversation and sharing, especially food.
![](/images/living-arts-project/companions.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
These ceramics are called companions. Companion means friend - someone or something you spend time with. The word companion is dervied from the Latin “com”, meaning with and the French “panis” meaning bread, so companion literally means "with bread"; sharing bread together, or breadfellows.
Companions are made by 2 people and they are part of a larger project, initiated by Clare Breen called the Breadfellows' Chats. In Breadfellows' Chats two people come together in conversation about art. This conversation inevitably touches every aspect of life. During this conversation they co-construct a ceramic object whose form is directly negotiated during this conversation - two sets of hands working together construct an object that holds within it the promise of a second meeting – to fulfil their practical funcion. The conversation that took place around the production of these objects is as important as the object itself. These objects are made by two people and are both artworks and functional tableware.
![](/images/living-arts-project/foundue2.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companionblue.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companiontracy.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companioncutlery.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companionkatinka.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/companiondoublebowl.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
{.grid}
Coming together and sharing food is an important part of Clare's practice. Sharing a meal is an moment for intimacy. During meals we converse and share, it is also a time when much informal learning takes place. Sharing meals is a convivial ritual practiced all over the world. Clare is interested in taking time to learn constructively through one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/feast1.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/Feast2.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
In school we began by talking about food, delicious and disgusting food imaginging a feast we could share together with many delicious and disgusting dishes.
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.2.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.6.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.7.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.4.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
We then worked together to make companions that will be used to share a meal at the end of our project together.
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.9.jpg){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.10.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.1.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.10.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.8.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.9.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week4.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/week3.13.JPG){.image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows1.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows2.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/breadfellows5.jpg){.third-centered .image-process-fullwidth}
{.grid}
Title: Exhibition - Week 14
Date: 2018/04/14
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/exhib01.JPG
# Exhibition at the Wexford Arts Center
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib01.JPG)
On the 14th of April the children's work was installed at the Wexford Arts Center alongside the work of Orla Bates with Scoil Mhuire, Horeswood, New Ross; David Begley with St. Senan’s National School, Enniscorthy; and John Busher with St. Mary’s National School, Ballygarret, Gorey.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib02.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib03.JPG)
The children served food to the guests in the ceramics they had made during the breadfellows' chats workshops. The table cloths were made from drawings of their most delicious and most disgusting foods.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib04.JPG)
This desire game, produced during Daniel Tuomey's workshop included drawings made by the children and plastiscine that visitors to the gallery could work with in response to the children's drawings.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib05.JPG)
The Breadfellows' Film was made over two workshops.
<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/270611496" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe>
<p><a href="https://vimeo.com/270611496">Breadfellows Film</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user83575056">breadfellows.school</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib06.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib07.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib08.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib09.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib06.JPG)
Title: Exhibition - Week 14
Date: 2018/04/14
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/exhib01.JPG
# Exhibition at the Wexford Arts Center
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib01.JPG)
On the 14th of April the children's work was installed at the Wexford Arts Center alongside the work of Orla Bates with Scoil Mhuire, Horeswood, New Ross; David Begley with St. Senan’s National School, Enniscorthy; and John Busher with St. Mary’s National School, Ballygarret, Gorey.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib02.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib03.JPG)
The children served food to the guests in the ceramics they had made during the breadfellows' chats workshops. The table cloths were made from drawings of their most delicious and most disgusting foods.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib04.JPG)
This desire game, produced during Daniel Tuomey's workshop included drawings made by the children and plastiscine that visitors to the gallery could work with in response to the children's drawings.
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib05.JPG)
The Breadfellows' Film was made over two workshops.
<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/270611496" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe>
<p><a href="https://vimeo.com/270611496">Breadfellows Film</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user83575056">breadfellows.school</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib06.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib07.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib08.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib09.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/exhib06.JPG)
Title: Dan Fogarty - Week 6
Date: 2017/11/29
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Daniel_Fogartycomp.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/365528681&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
Test: testing?
# Week​ ​6 - Responding to the work of Dan Fogarty
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danf1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf4.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf3.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Dan Fogarty makes paintings, sculptures, jewelry, clothing, magazines and furniture. In this workshop we will look at the ideas Dan is working on in his studio in Rotterdam right now. Dan posted some examples of work to the children before this class.
Dan makes things everyday and is always thinking about form in his everyday life, inside and outside the studio. He tries to look at things in the world differently. For him, being an artist is about having a certain mindset. In this workshop Dan invites the children to think about greeting cards.
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf2.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danfogarty_workshopplan.jpg)
This workshop considers how thinking about daily forms in a very specific, personal way changes how we see them and possibly changes our relationship to objects in our daily lives and to one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Package.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf3.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf26.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Dan sent the classes a parcel, in it was a big card with a small story. We began by making a list of all the times we can think of that people give cards....birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, new babies, new homes, Christmas, get well soon.... We made the list as long as we could, then the class split into pairs and came up with ideas for their own giant cards, just like Dan’s paintings. The only limitation was that they couldn’t use any of the occasions on the list, they had to think of personal, specific reasons to send a card.
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf20.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf19.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf17.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf18.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf7.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danf24.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf4.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Title: Dan Fogarty - Week 6
Date: 2017/11/29
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Daniel_Fogartycomp.png
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/365528681&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
Test: testing?
# Week​ ​6 - Responding to the work of Dan Fogarty
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danf1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf4.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf3.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Dan Fogarty makes paintings, sculptures, jewelry, clothing, magazines and furniture. In this workshop we will look at the ideas Dan is working on in his studio in Rotterdam right now. Dan posted some examples of work to the children before this class.
Dan makes things everyday and is always thinking about form in his everyday life, inside and outside the studio. He tries to look at things in the world differently. For him, being an artist is about having a certain mindset. In this workshop Dan invites the children to think about greeting cards.
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf2.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danfogarty_workshopplan.jpg)
This workshop considers how thinking about daily forms in a very specific, personal way changes how we see them and possibly changes our relationship to objects in our daily lives and to one another.
![](/images/living-arts-project/Package.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf3.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf26.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Dan sent the classes a parcel, in it was a big card with a small story. We began by making a list of all the times we can think of that people give cards....birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, new babies, new homes, Christmas, get well soon.... We made the list as long as we could, then the class split into pairs and came up with ideas for their own giant cards, just like Dan’s paintings. The only limitation was that they couldn’t use any of the occasions on the list, they had to think of personal, specific reasons to send a card.
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf20.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf19.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf17.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf18.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf7.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/Danf24.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danf4.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
Title: Daniel Tuomey - Week 7
Date: 2017/12/06
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/dant_profile.jpg
# Week 7 - responding to the work of Daniel Tuomey
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant_profile.jpg){.half-centered .lightbox .image-process-halfwidth}
Daniel likes to look at ordinary things like tables and chairs, and think about how they've come to exist and how they're connected to the ways we live our lives alone and together.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant6.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant4.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant5.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
{.grid}
Drawing is a very important part of Daniel's practice.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant7.jpg){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant8.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
Daniel sent a task to the class
# Draw a picture of something that you'd like to have in your sitting room when you grow up.
## It should be something that doesn't already exist. It shouldn't be anything magical, or anything you need to plug in. Don't write any words on the drawing!
Daniel is very interested in the answers to this question. In the studio Daniel asks himself questions like this one when he makes his artwork. Daniel thinks about desire, especially when he desires to draw something or make something. Drawing is a hard task for artists. Sometimes we try to draw or make something and it does not turn out the way we desire, does this make it a bad artwork? Sometimes drawing and making things is easier if we get other people involved, but this can make things turn out very differently to how we first pictured them. Sometimes this is OK.
We began the class by drawing. The class drew quietly, coming up with an image in response to Dan's questions.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant22.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan5.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan1.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan2.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan3.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan4.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
After about 10 minutes everyone put their drawing into a pile and picked out someone else's drawing. We sat back down and without talking to one another, everyone made a small sculpture of their selected drawing.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant11.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant13.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant14.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant17.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
We used simple materials: plastiscine, matchsticks and lollipop sticks to focus on the form of the sculptures, trying to represent the integrity of the drawings and the fantastic forms.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant18.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant34.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant35.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant36.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant37.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant23.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant2.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant21.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant15.JPG)
Title: Daniel Tuomey - Week 7
Date: 2017/12/06
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/dant_profile.jpg
# Week 7 - responding to the work of Daniel Tuomey
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant_profile.jpg){.half-centered .lightbox .image-process-halfwidth}
Daniel likes to look at ordinary things like tables and chairs, and think about how they've come to exist and how they're connected to the ways we live our lives alone and together.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant6.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant4.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant5.JPG){.third-centered .image-process-halfwidth}
{.grid}
Drawing is a very important part of Daniel's practice.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant7.jpg){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant8.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
Daniel sent a task to the class
# Draw a picture of something that you'd like to have in your sitting room when you grow up.
## It should be something that doesn't already exist. It shouldn't be anything magical, or anything you need to plug in. Don't write any words on the drawing!
Daniel is very interested in the answers to this question. In the studio Daniel asks himself questions like this one when he makes his artwork. Daniel thinks about desire, especially when he desires to draw something or make something. Drawing is a hard task for artists. Sometimes we try to draw or make something and it does not turn out the way we desire, does this make it a bad artwork? Sometimes drawing and making things is easier if we get other people involved, but this can make things turn out very differently to how we first pictured them. Sometimes this is OK.
We began the class by drawing. The class drew quietly, coming up with an image in response to Dan's questions.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant22.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan5.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan1.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan2.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan3.jpg){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/danscan4.jpg){.third-centered}
{.grid}
After about 10 minutes everyone put their drawing into a pile and picked out someone else's drawing. We sat back down and without talking to one another, everyone made a small sculpture of their selected drawing.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant1.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant10.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant11.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant13.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant14.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant17.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
We used simple materials: plastiscine, matchsticks and lollipop sticks to focus on the form of the sculptures, trying to represent the integrity of the drawings and the fantastic forms.
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant18.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant34.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant35.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant36.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant37.JPG){.third-centered}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant23.JPG){.third-centered}
{.grid}
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant2.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant21.JPG)
![](/images/living-arts-project/dant15.JPG)
Title: Hannah Fitz - Week 13
Date: 2018/02/28
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/In_Light_of_the_Lamp_hannah(2).png
![](/images/living-arts-project/han5.jpg){.half-centered }
Hannah Fitz is an artist, she lives in Frankfurt some of the time and in Dublin the rest of the time. She makes sculptures and videos.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah1.jpg){.half-centered }
Hannah says this sculpture is a flower in a vase, or this a sculpture pretending to be a flower in a vase. The sculpture is made up of a lot of different materials... wire, wood, plaster, water, paint....
Imagine a sculpture is all of these different materials coming together and pretending to be a…
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah2.jpg)
DOG!
In Hannah’s sculptures and videos there is always something that is trying to be like something else. Her sculptures are trying to be chairs and tables, hat stands and lamps, but they are always more like a picture of those things than the actual things.
Hannah makes sculptures pretending to be objects in the world, to help us think a little bit more carefully about all of these objects in our lives and the shapes they take.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah7.jpg)
Sometimes it is like a room of Hannah's sculptures are all pretending to be real objects in the world, but they look like drawings of objects!
Imagine if the sculpture is pretending to be a stool, but the sculpture doesn't know where the stool begins and ends. So the sculpture thinks the stool is also the shadow of the stool and it looks like this.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah3.JPG){.half-centered }
Hannah also likes to think about colour.
Hannah paints these sculptures with a colour, to show they are meant to be together. To show they are part of a set - they are different from all of the other things in the room, but they’re like one another.
It also means that each sculpture means different things for each person, depending on the colour.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah6.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah1.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah11.jpg){.third-centered }
{.grid}
So the sculpture is pretending to be an object, and sometimes getting it a bit wrong, and then the colour comes along. The colour shows that the objects belong together, but it also reminds each different person of different things.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han2.jpg)
The class began by looking, thinking and talking about Hannah's work. They talked about colour and associations what do certain colours mean to each of us? What do they remind us of, how do they effect us, do they trigger different emotions?
![](/images/living-arts-project/han01.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han02.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han03.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han04.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han05.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han06.jpg)
The class were split into teams - the blue, yellow, red and green teams. When they had collectively brought their associations for each colour together they painted four household objects, a mop, a plant, a vase and a lamp. Thinking of how simple Hannah's sculptures often look, they tried to represent the objects through a few simple characteristics, thinking of what is essential to include if they want to recognise each object.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han07.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han08.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han09.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han10.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han11.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han12.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han13.jpg)
As the paintings accumulated a we talked about how different colours brought the objects together as groups with different associations, like sports teams or uniforms, the same objects painted in yellow, had a different feeling to those painted in blue.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han14.jpg)
Title: Hannah Fitz - Week 13
Date: 2018/02/28
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/In_Light_of_the_Lamp_hannah(2).png
![](/images/living-arts-project/han5.jpg){.half-centered }
Hannah Fitz is an artist, she lives in Frankfurt some of the time and in Dublin the rest of the time. She makes sculptures and videos.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah1.jpg){.half-centered }
Hannah says this sculpture is a flower in a vase, or this a sculpture pretending to be a flower in a vase. The sculpture is made up of a lot of different materials... wire, wood, plaster, water, paint....
Imagine a sculpture is all of these different materials coming together and pretending to be a…
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah2.jpg)
DOG!
In Hannah’s sculptures and videos there is always something that is trying to be like something else. Her sculptures are trying to be chairs and tables, hat stands and lamps, but they are always more like a picture of those things than the actual things.
Hannah makes sculptures pretending to be objects in the world, to help us think a little bit more carefully about all of these objects in our lives and the shapes they take.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah7.jpg)
Sometimes it is like a room of Hannah's sculptures are all pretending to be real objects in the world, but they look like drawings of objects!
Imagine if the sculpture is pretending to be a stool, but the sculpture doesn't know where the stool begins and ends. So the sculpture thinks the stool is also the shadow of the stool and it looks like this.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah3.JPG){.half-centered }
Hannah also likes to think about colour.
Hannah paints these sculptures with a colour, to show they are meant to be together. To show they are part of a set - they are different from all of the other things in the room, but they’re like one another.
It also means that each sculpture means different things for each person, depending on the colour.
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah6.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah1.jpg){.third-centered }
![](/images/living-arts-project/hannah11.jpg){.third-centered }
{.grid}
So the sculpture is pretending to be an object, and sometimes getting it a bit wrong, and then the colour comes along. The colour shows that the objects belong together, but it also reminds each different person of different things.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han2.jpg)
The class began by looking, thinking and talking about Hannah's work. They talked about colour and associations what do certain colours mean to each of us? What do they remind us of, how do they effect us, do they trigger different emotions?
![](/images/living-arts-project/han01.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han02.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han03.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han04.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han05.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han06.jpg)
The class were split into teams - the blue, yellow, red and green teams. When they had collectively brought their associations for each colour together they painted four household objects, a mop, a plant, a vase and a lamp. Thinking of how simple Hannah's sculptures often look, they tried to represent the objects through a few simple characteristics, thinking of what is essential to include if they want to recognise each object.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han07.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han08.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han09.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han10.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han11.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han12.jpg)
![](/images/living-arts-project/han13.jpg)
As the paintings accumulated a we talked about how different colours brought the objects together as groups with different associations, like sports teams or uniforms, the same objects painted in yellow, had a different feeling to those painted in blue.
![](/images/living-arts-project/han14.jpg)
Title: index
Date: 2017/10
featured_image: images/living-arts-project/kari16.jpg
save_as: living_arts_project_index.html
Homepage_summary: This website is a space for exchange and learning over the course of six months between 48 primary school children from 3rd and 5th class and 11 contemporary artists based around the world. <br><br>The project is called Breadfellows' Chats and it is part of a larger initiative called The Living Arts Project organised by the Wexford Arts Center and supported by the Arts Department of Wexford County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/348273090&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
List_avatars: /images/living-arts-project/cheetah.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/football.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/optimus_prime.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/Po.JPG
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/images/living-arts-project/unicorn2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/unicorn.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/troll.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/sliotar.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/rose.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/robot.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/robin2.JPG
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/images/living-arts-project/paintbrush.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/mermaid.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/labrador.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/guitar.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/guineapig.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/greyhound.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/fox.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/football3.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/fairy.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog4.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog3.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/console.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/cat.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/butterfly.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/bed.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/batman.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/ball2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/ball.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/Puppy.png
/images/living-arts-project/wrestling.JPG
# The Living Arts Project
is a yearly residency organised by the Wexford Arts Center and supported by the Arts Department of Wexford County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.
I was invited as an artist in residence to St Ibar's National School and over the course of six months I worked with 48 primary school children from 3rd and 5th class, their teachers, local potter and ceramic artist Mairead Stafford and 11 contemporary artists based around the world.
I selected them as they work with a wide range of media and concepts and because they were all very keen to learn from the children's interpretations of their work. Each week focused on the work of one artist. Some of the artists visited the class, some connected to the class via skype and some sent questions or artworks by post or email.
Each week, using this website the children talked about the work of an artist, they made something in response to their work and at the end of each workshop they considered the question “what does an artist do?”
The aim was to create a safe space, give a sense of continuity and to take the time to really converse, consider and contradict one another - it is a positive thing change our minds about what art is and what it is for.
Title: index
Date: 2017/10
featured_image: images/living-arts-project/the_living_arts_project.jpg
save_as: living_arts_project_index.html
Homepage_summary: This website is a space for exchange and learning over the course of six months between 48 primary school children from 3rd and 5th class and 11 contemporary artists based around the world. <br><br>The project is called Breadfellows' Chats and it is part of a larger initiative called The Living Arts Project organised by the Wexford Arts Center and supported by the Arts Department of Wexford County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.
Embedded_sound: <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/348273090&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=true&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true"></iframe>
List_avatars: /images/living-arts-project/cheetah.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/football.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/optimus_prime.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/Po.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/hurl.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/tiger.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/hawk.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/lion.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/swallow.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/werewolf.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/unicorn2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/unicorn.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/troll.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/sliotar.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/rose.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/robot.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/robin2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/robin.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/pupper.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/peacock.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/paintbrush.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/mermaid.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/labrador.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/guitar.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/guineapig.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/greyhound.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/fox.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/football3.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/fairy.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog4.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog3.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/dog2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/console.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/cat.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/butterfly.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/bed.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/batman.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/ball2.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/ball.JPG
/images/living-arts-project/Puppy.png
/images/living-arts-project/wrestling.JPG
# The Living Arts Project
is a yearly residency organised by the Wexford Arts Center and supported by the Arts Department of Wexford County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.
I was invited as an artist in residence to St Ibar's National School and over the course of six months I worked with 48 primary school children from 3rd and 5th class, their teachers, local potter and ceramic artist Mairead Stafford and 11 contemporary artists based around the world.
I selected them as they work with a wide range of media and concepts and because they were all very keen to learn from the children's interpretations of their work. Each week focused on the work of one artist. Some of the artists visited the class, some connected to the class via skype and some sent questions or artworks by post or email.
Each week, using this website the children talked about the work of an artist, they made something in response to their work and at the end of each workshop they considered the question “what does an artist do?”
The aim was to create a safe space, give a sense of continuity and to take the time to really converse, consider and contradict one another - it is a positive thing change our minds about what art is and what it is for.
Title: Introductions - Week 1
Date: 2017/10/18
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Tunic_workshop_square.png
![](/images/living-arts-project/Tunic_workshop.jpg){.image-process-halfwidth}
Before the first workshop I asked each child to consider for a couple of days:
# If you were not a human, what would you like to be?
## This could be an animal or an object, an alien or a monster, anything you can think of, but it should reflect some of your best qualities. (If this question is very difficult you can ask your friends for some help!)
This question proposes an alternative introduction that is not based on nationality, age, gender etc. it leaves space for improvisation, allowing us all to introduce ourselves on our own terms.
Working collaboratively the children drew around one another while lying on the ground to find their shape, the traced figure became the outline for a tunic. Each child then painted the animal/ object/ monster/ alien they had selected on the tummy of their tunic to wear over their uniform for the coming weeks.
![](/images/living-arts-project/footballs.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/mairead_and_unicorn.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/batman_and_cheetah.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/the_joker.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/rainbow.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
![](/images/living-arts-project/IMG_2627.JPG){.image-process-halfwidth}
Title: Introductions - Week 1
Date: 2017/10/18
Featured_image: /images/living-arts-project/Tunic_workshop_square.png
![](/images/living-arts-project/Tunic_workshop.jpg){.image-process-halfwidth}