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<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
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<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......@@ -77,19 +77,22 @@ Next: <a href="Commands.html#Commands" accesskey="n" rel="next">Commands</a>, Pr
<h2 class="chapter">1 Introduction</h2>
<p>zeptodb is a small collection of relatively tiny command-line tools for
interacting with DBM databases. For the uninitiated, DBM databases are
flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they are persistent
key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a library for C,
Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by providing useful
command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with really basic binaries
for manipulating the databases, but they are not designed to be very
flexible or useful in the real world.
interacting with <em>DBM databases</em>. For the uninitiated, DBM
databases are flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they
are persistent key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a
library for C, Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by providing
useful command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with really basic
binaries for manipulating the databases, but they are not designed to be
very flexible or useful in the real world.
</p>
<p>These tools may be helpful in scripts, for example, when persistant
data storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill.
They may also be useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to
manipulate, via the command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by
other programs.
<p>These tools may be helpful in scripts, for example, when persistant data
storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill. DBM
databases offer a constant look-up time for any record in them, as
opposed to, say, searching through a text file, which scales linearly
with the number of lines in the file. Thus, scripts requiring fast data
look-up would benefit greatly from them. These commands may also be
useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to manipulate, via the
command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by other programs.
</p>
<table class="menu" border="0" cellspacing="0">
<tr><td align="left" valign="top">&bull; <a href="Tutorial.html#Tutorial" accesskey="1">Tutorial</a>:</td><td>&nbsp;&nbsp;</td><td align="left" valign="top">
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......@@ -90,6 +90,10 @@ their formats.
<pre class="example">$ zdbc foo.db
</pre></div>
<p>Note: the following two paragraphs contain technical information that is
only necessary if you will be creating large databases with many
records. If that is not the case, you may safely skip them.
</p>
<p>You can customize the creation of a database in two ways. The first is
by specifying the number of <em>buckets</em> that comprise the database,
specified via the <samp>-b</samp>/<samp>--num-buckets</samp> option. A DBM
......@@ -218,6 +222,14 @@ $ zdbf -a -d'|' foo.db
Mary|baz@example.com
</pre></div>
<p>Of course, these examples are not realistic. Rather than using the
programs from the command-line, you are more likely to use them in
scripts. For example, one script might save data to a database while
another script reads from that data. You can even build up relations
between multiple databases, storing the keys of one database as values
in another database, allowing quite complex, but always fast, look-ups
within your scripts.
</p>
<hr>
<div class="header">
<p>
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@ Next: <a href="Introduction.html#Introduction" accesskey="n" rel="next">Introduc
<a name="zeptodb"></a>
<h1 class="top">zeptodb</h1>
<p>This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<p>This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
</p>
<p>Copyright &copy; 2013 Brandon Invergo
</p>
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......
No preview for this file type
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<!-- This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ Next: <a href="#Introduction" accesskey="n" rel="next">Introduction</a>, Previou
<a name="zeptodb"></a>
<h1 class="top">zeptodb</h1>
<p>This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
<p>This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
</p>
<p>Copyright &copy; 2013 Brandon Invergo
</p>
......@@ -173,19 +173,22 @@ Next: <a href="#Commands" accesskey="n" rel="next">Commands</a>, Previous: <a hr
<h2 class="chapter">1 Introduction</h2>
<p>zeptodb is a small collection of relatively tiny command-line tools for
interacting with DBM databases. For the uninitiated, DBM databases are
flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they are persistent
key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a library for C,
Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by providing useful
command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with really basic binaries
for manipulating the databases, but they are not designed to be very
flexible or useful in the real world.
</p>
<p>These tools may be helpful in scripts, for example, when persistant
data storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill.
They may also be useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to
manipulate, via the command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by
other programs.
interacting with <em>DBM databases</em>. For the uninitiated, DBM
databases are flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they
are persistent key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a
library for C, Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by providing
useful command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with really basic
binaries for manipulating the databases, but they are not designed to be
very flexible or useful in the real world.
</p>
<p>These tools may be helpful in scripts, for example, when persistant data
storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill. DBM
databases offer a constant look-up time for any record in them, as
opposed to, say, searching through a text file, which scales linearly
with the number of lines in the file. Thus, scripts requiring fast data
look-up would benefit greatly from them. These commands may also be
useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to manipulate, via the
command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by other programs.
</p>
<table class="menu" border="0" cellspacing="0">
<tr><td align="left" valign="top">&bull; <a href="#Tutorial" accesskey="1">Tutorial</a>:</td><td>&nbsp;&nbsp;</td><td align="left" valign="top">
......@@ -217,6 +220,10 @@ their formats.
<pre class="example">$ zdbc foo.db
</pre></div>
<p>Note: the following two paragraphs contain technical information that is
only necessary if you will be creating large databases with many
records. If that is not the case, you may safely skip them.
</p>
<p>You can customize the creation of a database in two ways. The first is
by specifying the number of <em>buckets</em> that comprise the database,
specified via the <samp>-b</samp>/<samp>--num-buckets</samp> option. A DBM
......@@ -345,6 +352,14 @@ $ zdbf -a -d'|' foo.db
Mary|baz@example.com
</pre></div>
<p>Of course, these examples are not realistic. Rather than using the
programs from the command-line, you are more likely to use them in
scripts. For example, one script might save data to a database while
another script reads from that data. You can even build up relations
between multiple databases, storing the keys of one database as values
in another database, allowing quite complex, but always fast, look-ups
within your scripts.
</p>
<hr>
<a name="Back_002dends"></a>
<div class="header">
......
No preview for this file type
No preview for this file type
No preview for this file type
No preview for this file type
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ Index
zeptodb
*******
This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2b, updated 17 November 2013).
Copyright (C) 2013 Brandon Invergo
......@@ -33,19 +33,22 @@ This manual is for zeptodb (version 2.0.2, updated 17 November 2013).
**************
zeptodb is a small collection of relatively tiny command-line tools for
interacting with DBM databases. For the uninitiated, DBM databases are
flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they are persistent
key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a library for C,
Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by providing useful
command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with really basic binaries
for manipulating the databases, but they are not designed to be very
flexible or useful in the real world.
interacting with "DBM databases". For the uninitiated, DBM databases
are flat (non-relational) a databases; in other words, they are
persistent key-value hash tables. Typically they are created via a
library for C, Python, Perl, etc. These tools fill in a gap by
providing useful command-line tools. Some DBM libraries come with
really basic binaries for manipulating the databases, but they are not
designed to be very flexible or useful in the real world.
These tools may be helpful in scripts, for example, when persistant
data storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill. They
may also be useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to
manipulate, via the command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by
other programs.
data storage is needed but when a full database would be overkill. DBM
databases offer a constant look-up time for any record in them, as
opposed to, say, searching through a text file, which scales linearly
with the number of lines in the file. Thus, scripts requiring fast data
look-up would benefit greatly from them. These commands may also be
useful if, for whatever reason, one would like to manipulate, via the
command-line or scripts, DBM databases created by other programs.
1.1 Tutorial
============
......@@ -62,6 +65,10 @@ of their formats.
$ zdbc foo.db
Note: the following two paragraphs contain technical information that
is only necessary if you will be creating large databases with many
records. If that is not the case, you may safely skip them.
You can customize the creation of a database in two ways. The first
is by specifying the number of "buckets" that comprise the database,
specified via the '-b'/'--num-buckets' option. A DBM database can be
......@@ -170,6 +177,14 @@ operates in a very similar way to 'zdbf':
$ zdbf -a -d'|' foo.db
Mary|baz@example.com
Of course, these examples are not realistic. Rather than using the
programs from the command-line, you are more likely to use them in
scripts. For example, one script might save data to a database while
another script reads from that data. You can even build up relations
between multiple databases, storing the keys of one database as values
in another database, allowing quite complex, but always fast, look-ups
within your scripts.
1.2 Back-ends
=============
......
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