Commit 50e26153 authored by Lucas Descroix's avatar Lucas Descroix

Update README.md

parent e583b2c4
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**Italic & Mono, two vector-twisted companions**
Both styles, side-kicks to a central Roman, carry deep scars of the tools that produced them, as to point out their inherent Bezier substance. The Italic shares its x-height and optical weight with the Regular, but draws its structures in flourished Renaissance types such as Robert Granjon’s and its peculiar flavour in the made-up exercise of trackpad-calligraphy. It is an hommage to yesterday’s masters using one of the most common gesture-based interfaces of today.
The Mono cut is built upon the Regular but has been strongly distorted with DataFace, a little program we made based on the classic [FontTools] (https://github.com/fonttools/fonttools) library, that allowed us to automatically switch all on-curve points into off-curve ones and vice-versa. It gives the type’s contours a unique treatment, mixing arcs and straight lines in a completely unorthodox and vivacious way.
The Mono cut is built upon the Regular but has been strongly distorted with DataFace, a little program we made based on the classic [FontTools](https://github.com/fonttools/fonttools) library, that allowed us to automatically switch all on-curve points into off-curve ones and vice-versa. It gives the type’s contours a unique treatment, mixing arcs and straight lines in a completely unorthodox and vivacious way.
Bringing together History and the technical essence of nowadays typography, these two styles both integrated a part of surprise in their design process, a desired lost of control, an acceptance of error to bring out shapes that pure drawing would fail to imagine.
Imagining Syne has been a very exciting exploration, driven both by fun and serious interest in the many questions it raised. We took time to consider not only the importance of a custom type as main vector of an identity, but the meaning of the idea of family in typography. We ended up seeing it somewhat similar to the artistic gesture of Ready-Made, or *Found Object*, perfected by Marcel Duchamp in the early 20th century: not that the family preexists the designer, but that the mere fact of gathering fonts and calling them “family” can be most of what makes it a family, more than any objective resemblance.
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