Commit b246ba55 authored by Eric S. Raymond's avatar Eric S. Raymond

In the documentation, more name parameterization by attributes.

parent 3f966b74
......@@ -15,11 +15,12 @@ project-bug-list=bugs@ntpsec.org
project-bugengine=Bugzilla
project-bugtracker="NTPsec"
millshome=http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/
ntp=ntp
ntpd=ntpd
ntpdconf=ntpd.conf
ntpkeys=ntp.keys
ntpq=ntpq
ntptime=ntp-time
ntptime=ntptime
ntpwait=ntp-wait
sntp=sntp
ntpconfman=ntp.conf(5)
......
......@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ symmetric key cryptography, since the security is based on private and
public values which are generated by each participant and where the
private value is never revealed. Autokey uses X.509 public certificates,
which can be produced by commercial services, the OpenSSL application
program, or the link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen`] utility program in the
program, or the link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}`] utility program in the
NTP software distribution.
Note that according to US law, NTP binaries including OpenSSL library
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ US.
Authentication is configured separately for each association using the
`key` or `autokey` option of the `server` configuration command, as
described in the link:confopt.html[Server Options] page. The
link:keygen.html[ntp-keygen] page describes the files required for the
link:keygen.html[{ntpkeygen}] page describes the files required for the
various authentication schemes. Further details are in the briefings,
papers and reports at the {project-shortname} project page linked from
{project-weblink}.
......@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ distributed and stored using secure means beyond the scope of the NTP
protocol itself. Besides the keys used for ordinary NTP associations,
additional keys can be used as passwords for the `{ntpq}`
utility program. Ordinarily, the `{ntpkeys}` file is generated by the
`ntp-keygen` program, but it can be constructed and edited using an
`{ntpkeygen}` program, but it can be constructed and edited using an
ordinary text editor.
Each line of the keys file consists of three fields: a key ID in the
......
......@@ -72,13 +72,13 @@ than to change the cryptographic media file names.#
`pw` 'password';;
Specifies the password to decrypt files previously encrypted by the
`ntp-keygen` program with the `-p` option. If this option is not
`{ntpkeygen}` program with the `-p` option. If this option is not
specified, the default password is the string returned by the Unix
`gethostname()` routine.
`randfile` 'file';;
Specifies the location of the random seed file used by the OpenSSL
library. The defaults are described on the
link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen` page].
link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}` page].
`ident` 'group'::
Specifies the group name for ephemeral associations mobilized by
broadcast and symmetric passive modes. See the
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ than to change the cryptographic media file names.#
Specifies the complete directory path for the key file containing the
key IDs, key types and keys used by `{ntpd}` and `{ntpq}` when
operating with symmetric key cryptography. The format of the keyfile
is described on the link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen` page]. This is the
is described on the link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}` page]. This is the
same operation as the `-k` command line option. Note that the
directory path for Autokey cryptographic media is specified by the
`keysdir` command.
......
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ symmetric key or public key cryptography.
Autokey uses industry standard X.509 public certificates, which can be
produced by commercial services, utility programs in the OpenSSL
software library, and the link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen`] utility program
software library, and the link:keygen.html[{ntpkeygen}] utility program
in the NTP software distribution. A certificate includes the subject
name of the client, the issuer name of the server, the public key of the
client and the time period over which the the public and private keys
......@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ In some configurations where more than one subnet shares an Ethernet or
when multiple subnets exist in a manycast or pool configuration, it is
useful to isolate one subnet from another. In Autokey this can be done
using group names. An Autokey host name is specified by the
`-s`` host@group` option of the `ntp-keygen` program, where _`host`_ is
`-s`` host@group` option of the {ntpkeygen} program, where _`host`_ is
the host name and _`group`_ is the group name. If _`host`_ is omitted,
the name defaults to the string returned by the Unix `gethostname()`
routine, ordinarily the DNS name of the host. Thus, for host
......@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ applies to all hosts sharing a common broadcast, manycast or symmetric
passive modes, while the latter case applies to each individual
client/server or symmetric active mode association. In either case the
host listens to the specified group name in addition to the group name
specified in the `-s` option of the `ntp-keygen` program.
specified in the `-s` option of the `{ntpkeygen}` program.
[[secure]]
== Secure Groups ==
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ which usually contains a subset of the keys file.
Figure 2 shows how keys and parameters are distributed to servers and
clients. A TA constructs the encrypted keys file and the nonencrypted
parameters file. Hosts with no dependent clients can retrieve client
parameter files from an archive or web page. The `ntp-keygen` program
parameter files from an archive or web page. The `{ntpkeygen}` program
can export parameter files using the `-e` option. By convention, the
file name is the name of the secure group and must match the `ident`
option of the `crypto` command or the `ident` option of the `server`
......@@ -272,9 +272,9 @@ command.
When more than one TH Is involved in the secure group, it is convenient
for the TAs and THs to use the same encrypted key files. To do this, one
of the parent TAs includes the `-i group` option on the `ntp-keygen`
of the parent TAs includes the `-i group` option on the `{ntpkeygen}`
command line, where _`group`_ is the name of the child secure group. The
`ntp-keygen` program can export server keys files using the `-q` option
`{ntpkeygen}` program can export server keys files using the `-q` option
and a chosen remote password. The files are installed on the TAs and
then renamed using the name given as the first line in the file, but
without the filestamp. The secure group name must match the `ident`
......@@ -314,14 +314,14 @@ Referring to Figure 1, for each TH, A, B, R and X, as root:
["literal",subs="normal"]
`# cd /usr/local/etc`
`# ntp-keygen -T`
`# {ntpkeygen} -T`
and for the other hosts the same commands without the `-T` option. This
generates an RSA private/public host key file and a self-signed
certificate file for the RSA digital signature algorithm with the MD5
message digest algorithm. For the THs a trusted certificate is
generated; for the others a nontreusted certificate is generated.
Include in the `ntp.conf` configuration file for all hosts other than
Include in the `{ntpconf}` configuration file for all hosts other than
the primary servers, A, B and R, something like
["literal",subs="normal"]
......@@ -338,12 +338,12 @@ returned by the Unix `gethostname()` routine, ordinarily the DNS name of
the host. This name is used as the subject and issuer names on the
certificate, as well as the default password for the encrypted keys
file. The host name can be changed using the `-s` option of the
`ntp-keygen` program. The default password can be changed using the `-p`
option of the `ntp-keygen` program and the `pw` option of the `crypto`
`{ntpkeygen}` program. The default password can be changed using the `-p`
option of the `{ntpkeygen}` program and the `pw` option of the `crypto`
configuration command.
Group names can be added to this configuration by including the
`-s host@group` option with the `ntp-keygen` program. For the purpose of
`-s host@group` option with the `{ntpkeygen}` program. For the purpose of
illustration, the `host` string is empty, signifying the default host
name. For example, @`yellow` can be used for the Alice group, @`orange`
for the Helen group and @`blue` for the Carol group. In addition, for TH
......@@ -361,19 +361,19 @@ with the subnets of Figure 1 configured as in the previous section.
Recall that the parent subnet TA for Alice is C and for Helen is S. Each
of the TAs generates an encrypted server keys file and nonencrypted
client parameters file for the IFF identity scheme using the `-I` option
of the `ntp-keygen` program. Note the TAs are not necessarily trusted
of the `{ntpkeygen}` program. Note the TAs are not necessarily trusted
hosts, so may not need the `-T` option.
The nonencrypted client parameters can be exported using the command
`ntp-keygen -e >file`,
`{ntpkeygen} -e >file`,
where the `-e` option redirects the client parameters to _`file`_ via
the standard output stream for a mail application or stored locally for
later distribution to one or more THs. In a similar fashion the
encrypted keys file can be exported using the command
`ntp-keygen -q passw2 >file`,
`{ntpkeygen} -q passw2 >file`,
where _`passwd2`_ is the read password for another TA. We won't need
this file here.
......@@ -454,7 +454,7 @@ digest schemes or identity schemes and must be corrected by installing
the correct media and/or correcting the configuration file. One of the
most common errors is expired certificates, which must be regenerated
and signed at least once per year using the
link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen` - generate public and private keys]
link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}` - generate public and private keys]
program.
The following error codes are reported via the NTP control and
......@@ -501,7 +501,7 @@ file if configured.
[[files]]
== Files ==
See the link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen`] page. Note that provisions to
See the link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}`] page. Note that provisions to
load leap second values from the NIST files have been removed. These
provisions are now available whether or not the OpenSSL library is
available. However, the functions that can download these values from
......
......@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ help or money so we can hire skilled technical help.
== Configuration ==
You are now ready to configure the daemon. You will need to create a NTP
configuration file by default in `/etc/ntp.conf.` Newbies should see the
configuration file by default in `/etc/{ntpconf}.` Newbies should see the
link:quick.html[Quick Start] page for orientation. Seasoned veterans can
start with the link:ntpd.html[`{ntpd}` - Network Time Protocol (NTP)
daemon] page and move on to the specific configuration option pages from
......
......@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ cryptography servers and clients share session keys contained in a
secret key file In public key cryptography, which requires the OpenSSL
software library, the server has a private key, never shared, and a
public key with unrestricted distribution. The cryptographic media
required are produced by the link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen`] program.
required are produced by the link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}`] program.
Problems with symmetric key authentication are usually due to mismatched
keys or improper use of the `trustedkey` command. A simple way to check
......
......@@ -184,6 +184,7 @@ example:
Sentences like $GPGSV that don't contain the time will get counted in
the total but otherwise ignored.
//FIXME: ntp.org reference
https://support.ntp.org/bin/view/Support/ConfiguringNMEARefclocks[Configuring
NMEA Refclocks] might give further useful hints for specific hardware
devices that exhibit strange or curious behaviour.
......
......@@ -7,7 +7,6 @@ Address: 127.127.27.'u'
Reference ID: MSFa | MSF | DCF
Driver ID: MSF_ARCRON
Serial Port: /dev/arc__u__; 300bps, 8N2
Features: `tty_clk`
== Deprecation warning ==
......@@ -24,36 +23,15 @@ This driver supports the Arcron MSF, DCF and WWVB receivers. The clock
reports its ID as `"MSFa"`, `"MSF"`, `"DCF"` to indicate
the time source.
This documentation describes v1.3 (2003/2/21) of the source and has been
tested against ntpd 4.1.0 on linux x86. Changes from v1.1 and v1.2
include patches to work with the new ntp-4 code, clock support for DCF
and WWVB configurable via mode flag, an option to ignore resync request
(for those of us at the fringes of the WWVB signal, for instance),
averaging of the signal quality poll and several bug fixes, code cleanup
and standardizations. In all other respects, the driver works as per
v1.1 if a mode is not specified.
To use the alternate modes, the mode flag must be specified. If the mode
flag is 0, or unspecified, the original MSF version is assumed. This
should assure backwards compatibility and should not break existing
setups.
This code has been significantly slimmed down since the V1.0 version,
roughly halving the memory footprint of its code and data.
This driver is designed to allow the unit to run from batteries as
designed, for something approaching the 2.5 years expected in the usual
stand-alone mode, but no battery-life measurements have been taken.
Much of this code is originally from the other refclock driver files
with thanks. The code was originally made to work with the clock by
mailto:derek@toybox.demon.co.uk[Derek Mulcahy], with modifications by
mailto:d@hd.org[Damon Hart-Davis]. Thanks also to
mailto:lyndond@sentinet.co.uk[Lyndon David] for some of the
specifications of the clock. mailto:palfille@partners.org[Paul Alfille]
added support for the WWVB clock. mailto:cprice@cs-home.com[Christopher
Price] added enhanced support for the MSF, DCF and WWVB clocks.
There is support for a Tcl/Tk monitor written by Derek Mulcahy that
examines the output stats; see the
http://www2.exnet.com/NTP/ARC/ARC.html[ARC Rugby MSF Receiver] page for
......@@ -64,12 +42,12 @@ http://www.atomictime.com/Product17.html[Atomic Time PC].
Look at the notes at the start of the code for further information; some
of the more important details follow.
The driver interrogates the clock at each poll (ie every 64s by default)
The driver interrogates the clock at each poll (ie every 64sec by default)
for a timestamp. The clock responds at the start of the next second
(with the start bit of the first byte being on-time). In the default or
original MSF mode, the time is in `local' format, including the daylight
savings adjustment when it is in effect. The driver code converts the
time back to UTC. In modes 1-3 the driver can be configured for UTC or
time back to UTC. In modes 1-2 the driver can be configured for UTC or
local time depending on the setting of flag1.
The clock claims to be accurate to within about 20ms of the broadcast
......@@ -129,7 +107,7 @@ unsuccessful, so the initial timestamps will be close to reality, even
if with up to a day's clock drift in the worst case (the clock by
default resyncs to MSF once per day).
When alternate modes 1-3 are selected, the driver can be configured to
When alternate modes 1 or 2 are selected, the driver can be configured to
ignore the resync requests by setting `flag2` to 1. This allows clocks
at the fringe of the signal to resync at night when signals are
stronger.
......@@ -396,7 +374,7 @@ May 10 12:41:34 oolong ntpd[615]: ARCRON: sync finished, signal quality 3: OK, w
== Fudge Factors ==
`mode 0 | 1 | 2 | 3`::
`mode 0 | 1 | 2`::
Specifies the clock hardware model. This parameter is optional, it
defaults to the original mode of operation.
+
......@@ -407,8 +385,6 @@ Supported modes of operation:
1 - Updated MSF
+
2 - New DCF77
+
3 - New WWVB
`time1` 'time'::
Specifies the time offset calibration factor, in seconds and fraction,
......@@ -435,9 +411,20 @@ Supported modes of operation:
`flag3 0 | 1`::
If set to 1, better precision is reported (and thus lower dispersion)
while clock's received signal quality is known to be good.
`flag4 0 | 1`
`flag4 0 | 1`::
Not used by this driver.
== Authors ==
Much of this code is originally from the other refclock driver files
with thanks. The code was originally made to work with the clock by
mailto:derek@toybox.demon.co.uk[Derek Mulcahy], with modifications by
mailto:d@hd.org[Damon Hart-Davis]. Thanks also to
mailto:lyndond@sentinet.co.uk[Lyndon David] for some of the
specifications of the clock. mailto:palfille@partners.org[Paul Alfille]
added support for the WWVB clock. mailto:cprice@cs-home.com[Christopher
Price] added enhanced support for the MSF, DCF and WWVB clocks.
== Additional Information ==
link:refclock.html[Reference Clock Drivers]
......
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ No user initialization of the receiver is required. This driver is compatible wi
|======================================================
Note: When using Palisade 26664-00, you must set fudge flag2 to 1 in
*ntp.conf*. See link:#Configuration[configuration].
*{ntpconf}*. See link:#Configuration[configuration].
== GPS Installation ==
......@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@ parity).
[[Configuration]]
== NTP Configuration ==
Palisade NTP configuration file "ntp.conf" with event polling:
Palisade NTP configuration file "{ntpconf}" with event polling:
["literal",subs="normal"]
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
......@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ UTC almanac.
the interface module. It should flash once per second.
3. Connect Palisade's port A to the NTP host.
4. Configure NTP and the serial I/O port on the host system.
5. Initially use link:#flag2[`fudge flag2`] in *link:#Configuration[ntp.conf],* to disable event polling (see configuration).
5. Initially use link:#flag2[`fudge flag2`] in *link:#Configuration[{ntpconf}],* to disable event polling (see configuration).
6. Run NTP in debug mode (-d -d), to observe Palisade_receive events.
7. The driver reports the link:#TrackingStatus[tracking status of the
receiver]. Make sure it is tracking several satellites.
......
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ sold in Japan, and the time service through a telephone line.
* [[mode-1]]Tristate Ltd. TS-JJY01, TS-JJY02 link:http://www.tristate.ne.jp/[] (Japanese only)
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 1;;
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ whether it's before or after midnight.
* [[mode-2]]C-DEX Co.,Ltd. JST2000 link:http://www.c-dex.co.jp/[] (Japanese only)
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 2;;
......@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ Command -\-> Reply +
* [[mode-3]]Echo Keisokuki Co.,Ltd. LT-2000 link:http://www.clock.co.jp/[] (Japanese only)
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 3;;
......@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ Time code format::
* [[mode-4]]CITIZEN T.I.C. CO.,LTD. JJY-200 link:http://www.tic-citizen.co.jp/[] (Japanese only)
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 4;;
......@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ the onboard switches, the TS-GPSclock-01 should be set to command/response mode
Besides this driver ( Type 40 ), link:driver20.html[the generic NMEA
GPS driver ( Type 20 )] supports the TS-GPSclock-01 in NMEA mode.
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 5;;
......@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ whether it's before or after midnight.
The TDC-300 must be set to the type 3 data format using the front panel
menu display and the switches.
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode 6;;
......@@ -202,12 +202,12 @@ Communications Technology in Japan.
+
ATTENTION; This mode, the telephone JJY, can not be used with the
refclock_acts ( type 18 ) at the same time. Because the "phone"
statement in the ntp configuration file is not involved with the
statement in the configuration file is not involved with the
"server" statement, so the both the refclock_acts ( type 18 ) and this
refclock_jjy ( type 40, mode 100 to 180 ) can not recognize the
appropriate "phone" statement among the "phone" statements.
+
NTP configuration ( ntp.conf )::
NTP configuration ( {ntpconf} )::
+
--
server 127.127.40.X mode (100, 101 to 180) minpoll N;;
......
== Program Manual Pages ==
* link:ntpd.html[`ntpd` - Network Time Protocol (NTP) daemon]
* link:ntpq.html[`ntpq` - standard NTP query program]
* link:sntp.html[`sntp` - Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) client]
* link:ntpd.html[`{ntpd}` - Network Time Protocol (NTP) daemon]
* link:ntpq.html[`{ntpq}` - standard NTP query program]
* link:sntp.html[`{sntp}` - Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) client]
* link:ntptrace.html[`ntptrace` - trace a chain of NTP servers back to the primary source]
* link:tickadj.html[`tickadj` - set time-related kernel variables]
* link:ntptime.html[`ntptime` - read and set kernel time variables]
* link:keygen.html[`ntp-keygen` - generate public and private keys]
* link:ntptime.html[`{ntptime}` - read and set kernel time variables]
* link:keygen.html[`{ntpkeygen}` - generate public and private keys]
* link:ntpdsim_new.html[`ntpdsim` - Network Time Protocol (NTP) simulator]
* link:sitemap.html[Site Map]
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
* link:copyright.html[Copyright Notice]
* link:decode.html[Event Messages and Status Words]
* link:kern.html[Kernel Model for Precision Timekeeping]
* link:msyslog.html[`ntpd` System Log Messages]
* link:msyslog.html[`{ntpd}` System Log Messages]
* link:kernpps.html[PPSAPI Interface for Precision Time Signals]
* link:pps.html[Pulse-per-second (PPS) Signal Interfacing]
* link:sitemap.html[Site Map]
......
......@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ few will be user-visible:
* A number of obsolete refclocks have been removed.
* The deprecated ntpdate program has been replaced with a shell
wrapper around sntp.
wrapper around {sntp}.
* As noted above, Autokey support has been removed.
......@@ -170,10 +170,10 @@ information is available via the External Links collection, including a
book and numerous background papers and briefing presentations.
Background information on computer network time synchronization is on
the http://www.eecis.udel.edu/%7emills/exec.html[Executive Summary -
the {millshome}exec.html[Executive Summary -
Computer Network Time Synchronization] page. Background information,
bibliography and briefing slides suitable for presentations are on the
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/%7emills/ntp.html[Network Time
{millshome}ntp.html[Network Time
Synchronization Research Project] page. Additional information is at
the {project-shortname} web site {project-weblink}.
......
......@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ distribution
Ordinarily, the kernel clock discipline function is used with the NTP
daemon, but could be used for other purposes. The
link:ntptime.html[`ntptime`] utility program can be used to control it
link:ntptime.html[{ntptime}] utility program can be used to control it
manually.
The kernel model also provides support for an external precision timing
......
This diff is collapsed.
= `ntp-keygen` - generate public and private keys =
= {ntpkeygen} - generate public and private keys =
[cols="10%,90%",frame="none",grid="none",style="verse"]
|==============================
......
......@@ -277,7 +277,7 @@ and so on is suppressed.
`mlockall()` function. Defaults to 50 4k pages (200 4k pages in
OpenBSD).
`filenum` 'Nfiledescriptors';;
Specifies the maximum number of file descriptors ntp may have open
Specifies the maximum number of file descriptors {ntpd} may have open
at the same time. Defaults to system default.
`tos` [`beacon` 'beacon' | `ceiling` 'ceiling' | `cohort` {`0` | `1`} | `floor` 'floor' | `maxclock` 'maxclock' | `maxdist` 'maxdist' | `minclock` 'minclock' | `mindist` 'mindist' | `minsane` 'minsane' | `orphan` 'stratum' | `orphanwait` 'delay']::
This command alters certain system variables used by the the clock
......
......@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ meaning should be clear from context.
`cert_parse: invalid subject ?`::
There is a problem with a certificate. Operation cannot proceed untill
the problem is fixed. If the certificate is local, it can be
regenerated using the `ntp-keygen` program. If it is held somewhere
regenerated using the {ntpkeygen} program. If it is held somewhere
else, it must be fixed by the holder.
`crypto_?: defective key`::
......
= `ntp-wait` - waits until {ntpd} is in synchronized state =
= `{ntpwait}` - waits until {ntpd} is in synchronized state =
'''''
== Synopsis ==
`ntp-wait` [ `-v` ] [ `-n` 'tries' ] [ `-s` 'seconds' ]
`{ntpwait}` [ `-v` ] [ `-n` 'tries' ] [ `-s` 'seconds' ]
== Description ==
The `ntp-wait` program blocks until {ntpd} is in synchronized state. This
The `{ntpwait}` program blocks until {ntpd} is in synchronized state. This
can be useful at boot time, to delay the boot sequence until after "{ntpd}
-g" has set the time.
......
......@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ never a good idea.
`-c` string, `--configfile`=_string_::
configuration file name.
+
The name and path of the configuration file, `/etc/ntp.conf` by
The name and path of the configuration file, `/etc/{ntpconf}` by
default.
`-d`, `--debug-level`::
......@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ default.
+
The name and path of the frequency file, `/etc/ntp.drift` by default.
This is the same operation as the _driftfile_
configuration specification in the `/etc/ntp.conf` file.
configuration specification in the `/etc/{ntpconf}` file.
`-g`, `--panicgate`::
Allow the first adjustment to be Big. This option may appear an
......@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ specified _sched_setscheduler(SCHED_FIFO)_ priority.
any of the following options: saveconfigquit, wait-sync.
+
`{ntpd}` will not daemonize and will exit after the clock is first
synchronized. This behavior mimics that of the _ntpdate_ program,
synchronized. This behavior mimics that of the old _ntpdate_ program,
which has been replaced with a shell script. The `-g` and `-x` options can be
used with this option. Note: The kernel time discipline is disabled
with this option.
......@@ -461,7 +461,7 @@ file at hourly intervals.
The `{ntpd}` utility can operate in any of several modes, including
symmetric active/passive, client/server broadcast/multicast and
manycast, as described in the "Association Management" page (available
as part of the HTML documentation provided in `/usr/share/doc/ntp`). It
as part of the HTML documentation provided in `/usr/share/doc/{ntp}`). It
normally operates continuously while monitoring for small changes in
frequency and trimming the clock for the ultimate precision. However, it
can operate in a one-time mode where the time is set from an external
......@@ -559,7 +559,7 @@ the negative (huff) and positive (puff) correction, which depends on the
sign of the offset.
The filter is activated by the _tinker_ command and _huffpuff_ keyword,
as described in _ntp.conf_(5)_._
as described in {ntpconfman}.
[[files]]
== FILES ==
......@@ -567,7 +567,7 @@ as described in _ntp.conf_(5)_._
[options="header"]
|================================================================
|File |Default |Option |Option
|configuration file |`/etc/ntp.conf` |`-c` |`conffile`
|configuration file |`/etc/{ntpconf}`|`-c` |`conffile`
|frequency file |none |`-f` |`driftfile`
|leapseconds file |none | |`leapfile`
|process ID file |none |`-p` |`pidfile`
......
......@@ -50,20 +50,20 @@ Poisson distribution, while the wander generator produces samples from a
Guassian distribution.
The easiest way to use this program is to create a `ntpstats` directory,
configuration file `ntp.conf` and frequency file `ntp.drift` and test
configuration file `{ntpconf}` and frequency file `ntp.drift` and test
shell `test.sh` in the base directory. The `ntp.drift` file and
`ntpstats` directory can be empty to start. The `test.sh` script can
contain something like
-------------------------------------------------
rm ./ntpstats/*
ntpdsim -O 0.1 -C .001 -T 400 -W 1 -c ./ntp.conf,
ntpdsim -O 0.1 -C .001 -T 400 -W 1 -c ./{ntpconf},
-------------------------------------------------
which starts the simulator with a time offset 100 ms, network jitter 1
ms, frequency offset 400 PPM and oscillator wander 1 PPM/s. These
parameters represent typical conditions with modern workstations on a
Ethernet LAN. The ntp.conf file should contain something like
Ethernet LAN. The {ntpconf} file should contain something like
---------------------------------
disable kernel
......
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
== Synopsis ==
["literal",subs="normal"]
ntptime [ -chr ] [ -e 'est_error' ] [ -f 'frequency' ] [ -m 'max_error' ] [ -o 'offset' ] [ -s 'status' ] [ -t 'time_constant']
{ntptime} [ -chr ] [ -e 'est_error' ] [ -f 'frequency' ] [ -m 'max_error' ] [ -o 'offset' ] [ -s 'status' ] [ -t 'time_constant']
== Description ==
......@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ and `kerninfo` command.
== Options ==
`-c`::
Display the execution time of `ntptime` itself.
Display the execution time of `{ntptime}` itself.
`-e` 'est_error'::
Specify estimated error, in microseconds.
`-f` 'frequency'::
......
......@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Distribution] page describes how to do this.
While it is possible that certain configurations do not need a
configuration file, most do. The file, called by default
`/etc/ntp.conf`, need only contain one command specifying a remote
`/etc/{ntpconf}`, need only contain one command specifying a remote
server, for instance
`server foo.bar.com`
......
......@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ know the radio propagation time from the transmitter to the receiver.
This must be calculated for each specific receiver location and requires
the geographic coordinates of both the transmitter and receiver. The
transmitter coordinates for various radio services are given in the
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/%7emills/ntp/qth.html[Time and Frequency
{millshome}ntp/qth.html[Time and Frequency
Standard Station Information] page. Receiver coordinates can be obtained
locally or from Google Earth. The actual calculations are beyond the
scope of this document.
......
// This is the body of the manual page for ntpd.
// This is the body of the manual page for sntp.
// It's included in two places: once for the docs/ HTML
// tree, and once to make an individual man page.
== SYNOPSIS ==
*sntp*
{sntp}
[--help | -?] [-4 | -6] [-a keynum] [-b bcaddress] [-B bctimeout]
[-c] [-d] [-D debug-level] [-g delay] [-K kodfile] [-k keyfile]
[-l logfile] [-M steplimit] [-o ntpver] [-r] [-S] [-s]
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
== DESCRIPTION ==
`sntp` can be used as an SNTP client to query a NTP or SNTP server and
{sntp} can be used as an SNTP client to query a NTP or SNTP server and
either display the time or set the local system's time (given suitable
privilege). It can be run as an interactive command or from a _cron_
job. NTP (the Network Time Protocol) and SNTP (the Simple Network Time
......@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ option (`-k`) for more details.
Listen to the address specified for broadcast time sync. This option
may appear an unlimited number of times.
+
If specified `sntp` will listen to the specified address for NTP
If specified `{sntp}` will listen to the specified address for NTP
broadcasts. The default maximum wait time can (and probably should) be
modified with `-t`.
......@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ modified with `-t`.
Requests from an NTP "client" to a "server" should never be sent more
rapidly than one every 2 seconds. By default, any IPs returned as part
of a DNS lookup are assumed to be for a single instance of {ntpd}, and
therefore `sntp` will send queries to these IPs one after another,
therefore `{sntp}` will send queries to these IPs one after another,
with a 2-second gap in between each query.
+
The `-c` or `--concurrent` flag says that any IPs returned for the DNS
......@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ message will be displayed. The file will not be created.
`-k` file-name, `--keyfile`=_file-name_::
Look in this file for the key specified with `-a`.
+
This option specifies the keyfile. `sntp` will search for the key
This option specifies the keyfile. `{sntp}` will search for the key
specified with `-a` keyno in this file. See _{ntpkeysman}_ for more
information.
......@@ -149,34 +149,34 @@ situations demand different values.
number as its argument. Defaults to 4. Seldom useful.
`-r`, `--usereservedport`::
By default, `sntp` uses a UDP source port number selected by the
By default, `{sntp}` uses a UDP source port number selected by the
operating system. When this option is used, the reserved NTP port 123
is used, which most often requires `sntp` be invoked as the superuser
is used, which most often requires `{sntp}` be invoked as the superuser
(commonly "root"). This can help identify connectivity failures due to
port-based firewalling which affect `{ntpd}`, which always uses source
port 123.
`-S`, `--step`::
By default, `sntp` displays the clock offset but does not attempt to
By default, `{sntp}` displays the clock offset but does not attempt to
correct it. This option enables offset correction by stepping, that
is, directly setting the clock to the corrected time. This typically
requires `sntp` be invoked as the superuser ("root").
requires `{sntp}` be invoked as the superuser ("root").
`-s`, `--slew`::
By default, `sntp` displays the clock offset but does not attempt to
By default, `{sntp}` displays the clock offset but does not attempt to
correct it. This option enables offset correction by slewing using
adjtime(), which changes the rate of the clock for a period long
enough to accomplish the required offset (phase) correction. This
typically requires `sntp` be invoked as the superuser ("root").
typically requires `{sntp}` be invoked as the superuser ("root").
`-t` seconds, `--timeout`=_seconds_::
The number of seconds to wait for responses. This option takes an
integer number as its argument. The default _seconds_ for this option
is: 5.
+
When waiting for a reply, `sntp` will wait the number of seconds
When waiting for a reply, `{sntp}` will wait the number of seconds
specified before giving up. The default should be more than enough for
a unicast response. If `sntp` is only waiting for a broadcast response
a unicast response. If `{sntp}` is only waiting for a broadcast response
a longer timeout is likely needed.
`--wait`, `--no-wait`::
......@@ -190,19 +190,19 @@ If we are not setting the time, wait for all pending responses.
== USAGE ==
`sntp ntpserver.somewhere`::
`{sntp} ntpserver.somewhere`::
is the simplest use of this program and can be run as an unprivileged
command to check the current time and error in the local clock.
`sntp -Ss -M 128 ntpserver.somewhere`::
`{sntp} -Ss -M 128 ntpserver.somewhere`::
With suitable privilege, run as a command or from a _cron_(8) job,
`sntp -Ss -M 128 ntpserver.somewhere` will request the time from the
`{sntp} -Ss -M 128 ntpserver.somewhere` will request the time from the
server, and if that server reports that it is synchronized then if the
offset adjustment is less than 128 milliseconds the correction will be
slewed, and if the correction is more than 128 milliseconds the
correction will be stepped.
`sntp -S ntpserver.somewhere`::
`{sntp} -S ntpserver.somewhere`::
With suitable privilege, run as a command or from a _cron_(8) job,
`sntp -S ntpserver.somewhere` will set (step) the local clock from a
`{sntp} -S ntpserver.somewhere` will set (step) the local clock from a
synchronized specified server, like the `ntpdate` utility from older
NTP implementations.
......
= `sntp` - Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) Client =
= `{sntp}` - Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) Client =
[cols="10%,90%",frame="none",grid="none",style="verse"]
|==============================
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
This document describes the format of an NTP symmetric key file. For a
description of the use of this type of file, see the "Authentication
Support" section of the ntp.conf(5) page.
Support" page of the Web documentation.
{ntpdman} reads its keys from a file specified using the -k command line
option or the 'keys' statement in the configuration file. While key
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ where `keyno` is a positive integer (between 1 and 65534),
`key` is the key itself.
The `key` may be given in a format controlled by the `type` field. The
`type` MD5 is always supported. If ntpd was built with the OpenSSL
`type` MD5 is always supported. If {ntpd} was built with the OpenSSL
library then any digest library supported by that library may be
specified. However, if compliance with FIPS 140-2 is required the
`type` must be either 'SHA' or 'SHA1'.
......@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ _SHA_; _SHA1_; _RMD160_::
The key is a hex-encoded ASCII string of 40 characters, which is
truncated as necessary.
+
Note that the keys used by the ntpq(8) programs are
Note that the keys used by the {ntpqman} programs are
checked against passwords requested by the programs and entered by
hand, so it is generally appropriate to specify these keys in ASCII
format.
......