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<title> Uruwi's conlangs </title>
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<h1> Uruwi's Arka portal </h1>
<h2> Starter resources </h2>
<p> <a href="http://conlinguistics.org/arka/e_index.html"> The official Arka website </a> is no longer maintained (it seems), but it's a good resource for people who want to learn about Arka. </p>
<p> <a href="http://mindsc.ape.jp/klel/"> The Vulgar Arka dictionary </a> is still updated (albeit in Japanese); this is the dictionary you should be using. </p>
<p> <a href="http://titlilgas.blogspot.jp/2016/08/blog-post_3.html"> Titlil Gas's portal. </a> </p>
<p> <a href="https://www33.atwiki.jp/kakis/pages/1.html"> Kakis Erl Sax's wiki </a> is a great place for historical Arka materials if you can read Japanese. </p>
<h2> What to watch out for </h2>
<p> Things that aren't mentioned in the official site, at least not well. </p>
<ul>
<li> <hacm>o</hacm> is used before a word starting with a consonant. <hacm>ont</hacm> comes before a vowel-initial word. </li>
<li> If you want to relativise an object of a preposition (here, we use &quot;preposition&quot; for what the official site calls &quot;casers&quot;), the preposition should be put at the end of the clause, as done in English while trying to piss prescriptivists off. <i>The city in which we live</i> is translated, for instance, as <hacm>haim l'ans ra ka</hacm> (city <sc>rel</sc>=<sc>1pl</sc> live in). Omitting the preposition is also acceptable. See <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/faraspalt/levian/arka/vez/le">this page</a> for more details. </li>
<li> Speaking of which, relativising genitives isn't so straightforward. The above site translates <i>a friend whose father is a teacher</i> as <hacm>hacn le til kaan lex xaxan</hacm> (friend <sc>rel</sc> have father as teacher). What should you do if the clause uses some other verb? Beats me. </li>
<li> You might be confused about <a href="http://conlinguistics.org/arka/e_study_malt_12.html">&quot;turning conjunctions into casers&quot;</a>. In short, a preposition (note: we're not including <hacm>e</hacm>, which is special) can modify only a verb by default. Attaching <hacm>-en</hacm> allows it to modify a noun instead. </li>
</ul>
<h2> What happened to Seren Arbazard? </h2>
<p align="center"><hacm>SEREN ARBAZARD SETES SAT XE, HAYU LU ES FOS. el sain sen tu kon fi oktfesk.</hacm></p>
<p align="right"><i><a href="https://twitter.com/xaiesk/status/337545528353099776">Nias Avelantis</a></i></p>
<p> The relevant news article was taken down, but <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20130602072611/http://sankei.jp.msn.com/affairs/news/130601/crm13060118010008-n1.htm">here's an archive link</a> (Japanese). I'll leave it at that. </p>
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<h1> Whalecum to bb94's page </h1>
<p> Hello! I'm Uruwi, and I program things as well as play games and create
languages. (My GitHub account was made when my handle was blue_bear_94, so
that's the reason my handle here is bluebear94 [without the
underscores]). </p>
<p> Hello! I'm Uruwi (or kozet), and I program things as well as play games
and create languages. (My GitHub account was made when my handle was
blue_bear_94, so that's the reason my handle here is bluebear94 [without
the underscores]). </p>
<h2> My profiles </h2>
<p>
<a href="https://github.com/bluebear94">GitHub</a> |
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<h1> Uruwi's conlangs </h1>
<h1> Uruwi's conlangs </h1>
<p> <a href="https://github.com/bluebear94/uruwi-conlangs/"> Link to grammars. </a> </p>
<h2> Languages of the Domains </h2>
<h3> Domain I </h3>
<ul>
<li> [5] <b> Ḋraħýl Rase </b> – the language spoken in Ḋraħyn-Nŷr. One of the few languages that has a speaker-referent pronoun system. Fairly rich morphology, but nothing truly unusual. </li>
<li> [6] <b> Varta Avina </b> (Kavinan) – analytic SVO/NA/Pr language with intial consonant mutations and base-14 numerals. Again, nothing truly unusual. </li>
<li> [5] <b> Ḋraħýl Rase </b> [nɹaˈħil ˈɹase] – the language spoken in Ḋraħyn-Nŷr. One of the few languages that has a speaker-referent pronoun system. Fairly rich morphology, but nothing truly unusual. </li>
<li> [6] <b> Varta Avina </b> [varta avina] (Kavinan) – analytic SVO/NA/Pr language with intial consonant mutations and base-14 numerals. Again, nothing truly unusual. </li>
<li> [8] <b> Jbl </b> /jbl/ or [jyl] &amp;c. – official language of Nŋln, and widely spoken elsewhere. Consonants and vowels are interchangeable, and instead of nouns and verbs, there are concretes and abstracts. Allows speakers to use whatever base they want, and there are nonconservative determiners as well. </li>
<li> [9] A work in progress with infixes, diabolical inflections and grammatical spoonerisms. </li>
</ul>
<h3> Domain II </h3>
<ul>
<li> [7] <b> Lek-Tsaro </b> – spoken in Rymako thousands of years ago. Food-hole sounds are accompanied by rod signals. Features anaphoric pronouns and a tree mode, but very little recursion. Numerals are fairly unusual and impractical. Names can be like the ones of our languages, but they can also be whole clauses, or in extreme cases, multiple clauses. Uses a script inspired by one of my childhood cyphers. This languages was influenced by Isoraķatheð's works <i>from the start.</i> </li>
<li> [7_1] <b> Middle Rymakonian </b> – a descendant of Lek-Tsaro. Uses phonoruns. </li>
<li> [8] <b> Jbl </b> – official language of Nŋln, and widely spoken elsewhere. Consonants and vowels are interchangeable, and instead of nouns and verbs, there are concretes and abstracts. Allows speakers to use whatever base they want, and there are nonconservative determiners as well. </li>
<li> [7] <b> Lek-Tsaro </b> [lɛkˈtsaɹɔ] – spoken in Rymako thousands of years ago. Food-hole sounds are accompanied by rod signals. Features anaphoric pronouns and a tree mode, but very little recursion. Numerals are fairly unusual and impractical. Names can be like the ones of our languages, but they can also be whole clauses, or in extreme cases, multiple clauses. Uses a script inspired by one of my childhood cyphers. This languages was influenced by Isoraķatheð's works <i>from the start.</i> </li>
<li> [7_1] <b> Middle Rymakonian </b> <i> lek-rymako </i> [lɛkɹʉ̜ˈmakʌ] – a descendant of Lek-Tsaro. In addition to many of Lek-Tsaro's quirks, Middle Rymakonian boasts phonoruns and an unnecessarily baroque quoting system. </li>
</ul>
<h3> Domain III </h3>
<ul>
<li> [10] <b> ŊþaċaḤa </b> [,ŋθatɬa,χa] – a phonorun-based triconsonantal root language that allows permutations of root consonants. A work in progress. </li>
</ul>
<h2> Other languages </h2>
<ul>
<li> [1][2] These are both relexes that are not even worth talking about. </li>
<li> [3] <b> Mođëp'öso </b> – has an unusual (in a bad sense) phonology but little else is interesting. </li>
<li> [4] <b> Necarasso Cryssesa </b> – literally &quot;forest language&quot;. Intended to have an elvish aesthetic, but abandoned due to verbosity and naturalism issues. </li>
<li> [3] <b> Mođëp'öso </b> [moðepøso] – has an unusual (in a bad sense) phonology but little else is interesting. </li>
<li> [4] <b> Necarasso Cryssesa </b> [nekʰaɹaθʰɔː kʰɹiθʰesaː] – literally &quot;forest language&quot;. Intended to have an elvish aesthetic, but abandoned due to verbosity and naturalism issues. </li>
<li> [8.5] A language with many features I dislike. Tense consonants à la Korean, a politeness system and almost everything from Spanish (grammatical number being a notable feature that's absent). </li>
</ul>
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